2018 World’s Toughest Mudder Preview – Eli Hutchison


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New World’s Toughest Mudder obstacles, earning World’s Toughest golden carabiners, and more with Eli Hutchison.

Todays Podcast is sponsored by:

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Listen using the player below or the iTunes/Stitcher links at the top of this page. 

Atlanta, Georgia – Tough Mudder 2018


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Tough Mudder – Bouckaert Farms – Georgia October 2018

Nolan Kombol – Tough Mudder

Sean Corvelle

Andi Hardy

Matt Waller

Rhiannon Gerald

Karen DeLeon – Jack Links

Britt Canady, Andrea Logan, Lorraine Kieffer –Tough Mudder BootCamp Charlotte

Francis Lackner

Additional Links:

Weigh Too Tough – WTM 2014 Exclusive Obstacles

Hyd-Ra-Phobia Obstacle Video

PATREON

Todays Podcast is sponsored by:

Wetsuit Wearhouse – Save 15% using coupon code ORM15 on all purchases!

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Tough Mudder Introduces Their 2018 Pro Team/Competitive Series

12:20pm Update – Here is the podcast interview.

In September of 2017, TMHQ announced the first ever Tough Mudder Pro Team. Ryan Atkins, Lindsay Webster, Hunter McIntyre and Stef Bishop had already been featured on most of TM’s online content, so few were surprised.  Today, the 2018 team is being announced much sooner in the year. TMHQ revealed this morning that Ryan, Lindsay, and Hunter are all coming back, and they have added two more women. The first is Corinna Coffin. Corinna had been mostly dormant in OCR since BattleFrog folded in the fall of 2016. She came back last July to win the first ever Tough Mudder X.

The second woman is Allison Tai. Along with being the favorite guest of The World’s Toughest Podcast, Allison won last year’s Holy Grail Leaderboard (Total competitive miles) with 305 total miles. Stef Bishop is not returning to the team. Stef won World’s Toughest Mudder in 2016, then had a relatively disappointing 2017 Tough Mudder season.

Matt B. Davis spoke to TMHQ’s Eli Hutchison and Corinna Coffin to discuss some of the news. The podcast episode will be released later today, so be sure to download it so you can listen to it on your next run.

Matt and Eli will be talking about the evolution of the competitive series. Many Mudders enjoyed the Tougher and Toughest events in 2017, as well as Tough Mudder X and World’s Toughest Mudder. Tough Mudder is now calling these events, Fittest, Fastest, and Toughest, with the culmination being World’s Toughest Mudder on November 10th and 11th in Atlanta, Georgia.

Check out the video introducing the different championship series here!

Photo Credits: Tough Mudder

Tough Mudder Unveils New 2018 Obstacles

TOUGH MUDDER UNVEILS 2018 NEW OBSTACLES

 

3+ Million Participants to Receive a ‘Happy Ending’ on Biggest Challenge in Obstacle Course Racing History

 

BROOKLYN, NY (January 11, 2018) – Famous for the company’s epic Innovation Lab, Tough Mudder Inc., the leading sports, active lifestyle and media brand, announced today its revolutionary twist on obstacles for the 2018 event season by unveiling the biggest structure to ever hit the obstacle course racing industry, Happy Ending, presented by Merrell, and Kong Infinity, the first obstacle in company history to be designed by members of the global tribe of more than 3 million Mudders. The company also revealed the iconic “Vault” obstacles (previously retired) coming back to course in 2018.

 

A physical embodiment of the organization’s 2018 yearlong “Tougher Together” campaign, Happy Ending is the new Tough Mudder Finisher Obstacle requiring teamwork by participants of all levels. Sitting at nearly 25 feet tall and over 80 feet wide and 100 feet long, it marks the biggest structure ever featured on course. To complete Happy Ending, participants must climb and push their way up an angled structure (40 degrees) creating human pyramids as they ladder over one another up multiple slippery inclines. At the summit, participants then dive feet-first down a 30 foot slide into a water pit.

Dedicated to the development of new products and entry points that enable millions of people to be part of Mudder Nation, Happy Ending brings participants together no matter the person’s athletic ability, the number of events run or event (Tough Mudder Full 10 miles; or Tough Mudder Half 5 miles). Teamwork and camaraderie – the Tough Mudder spirit – will be felt as participants cross the Finish line together.

 

Tough Mudder is an inclusive brand committed to connecting people. As a global tribe, we break down social barriers such as race, religion and politics. By using our sport as a vehicle for change, our events highlight the everyday heroes and elite athletes who together bring positive transformation worldwide,” said Will Dean, Tough Mudder, Inc. CEO and Co-Founder. “We look forward to welcoming thousands of new and returning participants to Mudder Nation in 2018 to face these challenges together – from completing the best-in-class obstacles on course to overcoming issues off. We remain dedicated to engineering ways to challenge our participants, both physically and mentally, all while giving millions of people a ‘Happy Ending’ and creating an exciting environment that showcases how we are stronger when we are united.

 

Happy Ending replaces the infamous Electroshock Therapy (EST) obstacle in which participants ran through dangling electrified wires. Although EST is “retiring” as a finisher challenge, it will transition to the Tough Mudder Full (10-mile) course and will be optional for all participants via bypass lanes – as not all are ready to get shocked with 10,000 volts.

 

Participants who are looking for a new shocking challenge may choose to exit Happy Ending by sliding down Third Rail – the bonus electricity challenge featuring more than 10,000 volts hanging from wires on a 30-foot slide into a pit of water. This optional challenge is for the bravest of all participants. Those not wishing to give it a shock – shot – may slide down the regular Happy Ending exit.

 

Tough Mudder is making a concerted effort to invest in Tough Mudder Half to provide accessible, yet rewarding experiences, to so many runners and outdoor enthusiasts who are not being challenged or excited by ordinary runs or half marathons,” said Dean. “From people who have never tried a mud run to seasoned Legionnaires who would like to bring friends, the Tough Mudder Half events serve as unique entry points to the world of obstacle course races and exclude the more extreme elements like fire and ice, in addition to making electricity completely optional. Tough Mudder’s commitment to innovation and dedication to enhance short distance challenges further positions the company as a global leader in the active lifestyle and sports categories.

Kong-Infinity – Obstacle Design Challenge Winning Obstacle

2018 marks the first year a Tough Mudder Obstacle Design Challenge winning innovation will be featured on course globally. A literal “spin” off of the iconic Kong obstacle, Kong Infinity is engineered to test even the most experienced Tough Mudders by being one of the most technically challenging obstacles on course. Requiring upper body strength and agility, participants start by climbing a 15-foot structure to reach a barrel which has handles fixed around its circumference on a set of tracks suspended more than 20 feet off the ground. By using momentum, participants rotate the barrel along the tracks to the other side. Kong-Infinity was designed by Ross Munro and Jonny McDonald of Glasgow, U.K.

For the first time since its inception in 2016, Kong, the giant, 30-foot obstacle in which participants swing like Tarzan, traversing from one floating ring to another, will be featured on the Tough Mudder Full course where everyone will have the opportunity to conquer this massive challenge.

 

Tough Mudder Vault

To celebrate Tough Mudder’s long and epic history of obstacle innovation, the company wants Mudder Nation to select which obstacles will return to course in 2018. The company unveiled the 25 historic obstacles Mudder Nation may vote on today through Friday, Jan. 26 at ToughMudder.com/obstacles. The winning “Vault” obstacles will be unveiled Feb. 5 with two-to-three historic challenges featured on every course in 2018 giving participants the chance to relive their favorite classics or for new Mudders, the chance to experience the best obstacles Tough Mudder has had to offer. A full list of the 25 obstacles is available online at ToughMudder.com/obstacles.

As an upgrade to the Vault obstacles for Legionnaires, participants who have completed multiple events, every course will have mystery vault features designed specifically for the Mudder Legion that include unique, never-before-seen modifications and design elements. Another Legionnaire-only obstacle coming to course is T-Boned – an added challenge to the classic Skidmarked, a slanted 10-foot wall. Participant’s upper body strength will be put to the test with an added twist of a 90-degree horizontal ledge to overcome 9 feet off the ground.

 

3 Million Mudders

With more than 3 million participants to date across five continents, Tough Mudder has offerings ranging from accessible yet rewarding challenges, such as Tough Mudder Half (five-mile event excluding fire, ice, and electricity), to competitive events, such as Tough Mudder X (the toughest mile on the planet), and World’s Toughest Mudder (24-hour endurance event).

This year, Tough Mudder, Inc. and its licensees will host an unprecedented 150+ events across nearly a dozen countries, such as the United States, The United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, United Arab Emirates, Canada and two new countries, South Africa, Philippines, welcoming participants worldwide into a global community that lives courage, personal accomplishment, teamwork and fun.

For more information on the 2018 Tough Mudder obstacles, or to purchase tickets to 2018 Tough Mudder events, visit ToughMudder.com.

 

 

About Tough Mudder, Inc.:

Founded in 2010 with the launch of the Tough Mudder obstacle course event series, Tough Mudder Inc. has become a leading global sports, active lifestyle and media brand. With more than 3 million participants, the company hosts more than 130 non-competitive (Mini Mudder; Tough Mudder 5K, Tough Mudder Half, and Tough Mudder Full) and competitive (Tougher, Toughest, Tough Mudder X and World’s Toughest Mudder) events annually in 11 countries including China, Dubai, Indonesia, and Australia through its partnerships with IMG, Seroja and Sports Media and Entertainment 360 (SME360). The company’s content arm provides the more than millions of engaged online brand enthusiasts with fitness, nutrition, and wellness content delivered daily across social and digital platforms. Tough Mudder broadcast, OTT and Live Stream programming can be seen worldwide through partnerships with CBS Sports, Facebook, Sky Sports, The CW Network and ESPN Media Distribution. Other sponsorship and distribution partners include Merrell, Amazon, KILL CLIFF, Jeep, Aflac, Guinness, Vega, Samsung, Olympus, Lucozade Sport, Nexcare, For Goodness Shakes, Bosch, TREK, Head & Shoulders, L’Oreal Men Expert, Käserei Loose, Snapchat and Live Stream.

 

Why My Wetsuit Played A Huge Role At World’s Toughest Mudder

There is something about a 24-hour race that you can never fully be prepared for. I could train harder, run faster, complete more pull-ups, and carry heavier things, but that doesn’t guarantee anything at World’s Toughest Mudder (WTM). Training is imperative to success, but there is a limit to what your physical prowess can provide. There are moments when you have to rely on our emotional and psychological strength to push you through, but even that gets tapped out at a certain point. Just like any race, there is utmost importance to prepare physically and psychologically, but unlike other races, gear plays an essential role in this 24-hour grind.

 

Coming into WTM for the fourth time, I knew what to expect, but there is only so much that prepares you for 24 hours of the unknown. Unlike previous years, I was competing in the Team Relay competition instead of the individual category. This would throw in a whole new dynamic to the once familiar race. Instead of slowly grinding my way throughout the race, I was tasked with racing hard for a short time and then stopping.

Here was the plan, start the race as a four-man team and then alternate two people every lap, minimizing pit time, until the wheels fell off. I was hoping that faster laps would allow me to wear a thinner wetsuit than previous years, knowing full well that things can go downhill quickly. I prepared my usual gauntlet of wetsuits and layers just in case. The plan was to start off in shorts and a t-shirt.
Once the sun went down, I switched into long compression gear. Then the Blegg Mitts and a windbreaker came on for a little more warmth. I knew that temperatures would quickly drop and more water obstacles at night meant that we would be cold and wet for the duration of the race. During previous years I wore full wetsuits ranging from 3/2mm to 5/3mm, often making it difficult to move. The relay calls for quicker laps, so I needed something that was warm enough, but less constricting than a full wetsuit. The plan was to use the Hyperflex VYRL 2.5mm Shorty Springsuit with a front chest zip and the 2.5mm Neosport Wetsuit Cap with an adjustable chinstrap from Wetsuit Wearhouse.

I wish I had more to tell you, but the truth is, this combination worked like a charm. Every lap, my teammate and I would start our lap in cold, wet gear. Putting those cold clothes on every lap added a whole new dimension of suck to WTM. Less than a mile into the lap, my body would warm up and it was off to the races. While the water temperature threw a wrench into many people’s plans, my layered outfit was perfect for staying warm on-course. When we finished a lap, we would quickly strip out of our wet clothes, throw on something warm, and try to recover for the next lap. While it would have been nice to have two wetsuits that I could alternate, this was a small wrinkle in the scheme of things. Plus, this is WORLD”S TOUGHEST MUDDER. It isn’t easy. While it was hard putting on wet clothes as we prepared for another lap, it didn’t rival the psychological ups and downs of the relay format.

All in all, it was a tough race. Starting and stopping throughout the night was a whole new challenge that I have never experienced. I was forced to stay loose while trying to recover in time for my next effort. My laps felt like an all-out sprint at times and it gave me a whole new experience at WTM. Our team managed to finish 2nd overall in the Team Relay category and I am so proud of my teammates and pit crew for helping us along the way. While Atlanta will bring a whole new challenge to WTM, I can only speculate that people will underestimate the conditions and forgo bringing a wetsuit. Don’t be one of those people. World’s Toughest Mudder is a race of unknowns, so always be prepared. I can’t wait to see all you crazies out there!

Nerd Alert! World’s Toughest Mudder Stats

I’ve always been a lover of statistics when it comes to sports. As a child, I collected baseball cards and was way more interested in the back of the card than the front. I would put the cards of my favorite players in protective binder sleeves with the backs facing forward, just so I would see the stats first. With a push towards analytics and sabermetrics, one now needs a degree from MIT to be able to understand stats in baseball. I mean, can anyone explain to me what FIP (Fielding Independent Pitching) measures? I mean seriously, what the hell is this? FIP = ((13*HR)+(3*(BB+HBP))-(2*K))/IP + constant. It’s enough to make your head spin.

When they don’t go overboard like baseball, statistics can give us a fantastic way to visualize performance in sport. In regards to obstacle racing, there are many ways these numbers can give us a better look at our sport. For mandatory obstacle completion races such as OCRWC, band retention stats can help quantify how difficult the race was, or how tough specific obstacles were. For races like WTM, we can see how hard it is to reach that coveted 50 mile mark, or just how much better Ryan Atkins is than pretty much everyone else.

So here is what I’ve been doing with my apparently infinite free time (should have been training). I’ve made spreadsheets for every year of World’s Toughest Mudder and input the data using the results. I then turned those into column charts to further illustrate the numbers. For the earlier years, there is only placement for the top 10 or just the winners. For those I had to count each finisher at each mileage, so there may be a couple discrepancies here and there, but this should be very accurate give or take a few competitors. I only did this for individuals because the team event has not taken place every year, and the format has changed a few times.

 

2017 World’s Toughest Mudder

50 miles is a big goal number for anyone that competes at World’s Toughest Mudder, and 2017 exemplifies that with the highest total number of 50 mile finishers of any WTM. 2017 WTM saw over 400 people claim their 50 mile bib! It seems people really push themselves to get beyond the 45 mile mark and finish with 50. There is a very low number of finishers with exactly 45 miles. You can also see that people may be pretty happy getting that 50 miles bib and not continuing further, as there are a relatively low amount of 55 mile finishers compared to 50 mile finishers.

 

2016 World’s Toughest Mudder

2016 WTM was very similar to 2017, although it did see almost 11% more competitors make it to at least the 55 mile mark. It also saw over 50% of competitors reach at least 50 miles. The half century mark was by far the highest finisher spot with over 26% of the field finishing with exactly 50 miles. This year also saw the highest average mileage for male competitors at 45 miles.

 

2015 World’s Toughest Mudder

I am no WTM historian, and was not there, but I believe 2015 was the coldest year in Vegas with temps reaching the low 40’s. If that was the case, the stats show that with very high numbers finishing in the 25-35 range. Over 36% of competitors finished in that range. 2015 still saw more finishers at 50 miles than any other mileage, but trailed closely by 25 mile finishers.

 

2014 World’s Toughest Mudder

The first year in the desert brought the infamous sandstorm. This took a toll on mileage as you can see the chart is very similar to 2015 with the colder temps, but actually has a 25 mile finisher rate than 50 miles. 2014 was the only time in Vegas where that occurred.

 

2013 World’s Toughest Mudder

2013’s chart looks extremely similar to 2016 and 2017. Almost 52% finished at least 50 miles. Very impressive for the last run in NJ. The temps were quite a bit higher this year than the other years in NJ though, so the weather was more favorable. This year had the highest average mileage for women, and just edged out 2016 for highest average mileage total.

 

2012 World’s Toughest Mudder

Tough race, but it looks as though more people knew what to expect this year vs 2011. The temps were warmer, but still, only 3o% of competitors made it beyond 3 laps/30 miles.

 

2011 World’s Toughest Mudder

Just brutal! Over 55% of competitors bailed after their first lap, and another 25% were gone after finishing the second. So 80% of people that started only made it 16 miles. This was the only WTM that took place in December, and temperatures were frigid. The low temp was in the mid 20’s and people just weren’t having it. It also needs to be noted that they did not start mileage awards till a couple years later. I actually only think they counted the winners as official finishers, so there wasn’t that incentive to keep pushing or to even have a mileage goal. One other thing of note about 2011 is the women actually had a higher average mileage than the men. This was the only year that has happened.

 

World’s Toughest Mudder 2011-2017

These are the composite charts for all seven years of World’s Toughest Mudder. You can really see just how rare it is to finish with more than 75 miles, as just over 1% of the almost 7400 total competitors have done so. Hell, less than 14% have made it beyond the 50 mile mark. I’m also a little surprised at just how few women have competed in this event. There have been over 7 times more men run WTM over the years than women.  This sport has always been dominated by men when it comes to numbers, but it is slowly trending up for the women at WTM. I think the addition of the Toughest Mudder 8 HR series will only help bring more participants to World’s Toughest Mudder, as it really provides people the opportunity to get acclimated to doing these longer OCR events.

ATL

I for one am extremely excited for WTM 2018, as it will take place about 25 minutes from my house, and be my first go at the grueling event. I’m hesitant to name a goal mileage at this point, because a lot can happen in the next 340 plus days. The 30 miles I finished at Toughest South were the most I’ve ever run in one event. I’d like to at least double that next November, but regardless, I can’t wait to be a part of this amazing event. Here’s to hoping I end up on the right side of the statistics!

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