What Lindsay Webster Taught Me About Racing

Lindsay Webster. In the OCR world, her name is as common as Kim Kardashian. She’s an absolutely outstanding athlete. Although I personally have never met her, I’ve heard incredible things about her character, too.

The most exciting thing about obstacle racing is watching others. There are so many people that we can learn a lot from, and Lindsay certainly is a person to watch from. Most people admire her confidence on the obstacles and trails, but she has taught me something that is so much more than that.

The lesson that she taught me is just how great racing can be when you embrace how much fun it is.

2016 Spartan US Champ Lindsay Webster

2016 Spartan US Champ Lindsay Webster

Let’s face it–all we see are these super bad-ass pictures of people. You know, the massive guys with six-packs covered with mud and battle scars, and of course, we could never forget the infamous picture of Amelia Boone, straight-faced and covered with mud. All of Lindsay’s pictures are so much different from that. In all of her pictures, she is smiling.

Not only that, but she is the best in the business. She has several world championships under her belt, and never ceases to disappoint. Obviously, if she is taking a more positive approach to racing–it’s working. Having “good race vibes” are not only better for your mind, but they seem to be better for your results, too.

 

(photo from OCRM archive…)

Now, of course, there are some hot shots out there, who are literally being paid to race. But the rest of us, even though we all have dreams of being successful and becoming better versions of ourselves, we’re here for fun. It’s so easy to get caught up on times and worry about failing obstacles, but in the end, the goal should always be to enjoy the ride. So, let’s stop allowing ourselves to stress about racing–instead, let’s join Lindsay Webster and smile.

(Photo from OCRM Archive)

 

OCR Training with Leaderboard: Trading My Bikini Gig For Running and Rigs

My Last Pro Show of 2017

At the beginning of the year, I began to plan out my race season. Typically this would involve the Peachtree Road Race (the only road race I enjoy) and some other trail runs scattered throughout the year. However, as I embarked on a new adventure in obstacle course racing, I quickly found myself lost.

As a former pro bikini competitor, I thought my traditional workouts mixed with some runs throughout the week would suffice. Once I realized the types of skill I would need and began to add that to my plate, I started to notice that my recovery was not what it once was and honestly I began to wonder if it had something to do with my age (yikes!).

During my podcast interview with Matt B. Davis on Obstacle Racing Media Podcast, he mentioned Hunter McIntyre and at the time, I am ashamed to say, I had no idea who he was. Matt told me to reach out to him on IG for pointers and I did. I was blown away by his kindness and willingness to help. If you know Hunter, even through his social media, you know he is quite the character, but under all that craziness is a guy who is super passionate about helping people as much as he is about winning races.

After our chat, I realized that bodybuilding mixed with some running and grip work was not going to cut it. I started researching OCR training and tips, but still felt lost, so I talked to Hunter once again after hearing he and Brakken Kraker on the ORM podcast discussing their online training platform for athletes. Enter Leaderboard.

There are 8 different paths on Leaderboard, each designed to prepare you for your course preference or OCR specific skills. There is everything from a short course path for those athletes who race shorter distances, like TMX, an ultra path for endurance athletes, Hunter’s Biceps Win Races (BWR) line up, and more. I am on the BWR AD program, where I receive daily WODs with personalized RX and pacing AND mobility WODs. Mobility was something I never had much focus on prior to LB.

Heavy Carry Practice

Heavy Carry Practice

After each WOD I complete, I record my results and can see how I stack up compared to the rest of the community that is on the same path, hence the name Leaderboard. I was super intimidated at first by these scores, but the entire community of athletes on LB is so supportive that it really pushed me even harder. When I would feel discouraged by my scores because let’s face it, I am a total newb, and didn’t exactly light up the leaderboard, I would receive comments congratulating me or telling me how quickly I would improve. Take a guess at how many bikini competitors make it a point to genuinely encourage one another – not many.

The coaches have also been super encouraging and I can’t tell you how amazing it is to get tips and tricks from coaches that are pros in the sport! As a fitness coach and former bikini competition coach, I know how valuable this is. The best part of LB is the communication forum curated by the LB Coaches.

As a new OCR athlete, I had tons of questions and really just dove into the training and pushed through even when fatigued. The coaches guided me through some of the rough spots and even had me back off a bit instead of pushing through like you do in bodybuilding. Don’t get me wrong, they never told me to be lazy, but they wanted me fully recovered and getting in quality workouts even if that meant scaling down for efficiency.

I ended up tweaking something in my hip due to my poor running mechanics (I’ll save this one for another post) and ALL of the LB coaches checked on my issues and made sure that I had particular mobility WODs to perform aside from the ones already assigned in LB. In addition, they routinely checked in to ensure that it was I was getting better and was in a healthy place to be able to run my first race. This is something that I had never experienced before. Former coaches that I have had would make me feel like I needed to work harder or grind more and give the “how bad do you want it” speech over and over when something happened. My experience with LB coaches can be boiled down to if you want it bad enough, you have to be able to distinguish between quality and quantity.

The community I have found in LB is truly inspiring. Not only do I have accountability, I have support from people all over the world who are going through the same thing with me at their own pace and skill level. Did I mention that I have that without having to leave my home gym? I was worried I would need a fancy (aka expensive) membership to have access to the equipment I needed, but aside from buying a super affordable sandbag, I had everything I needed in my garage gym. If something came up on the WOD that I didn’t have, there was always a substitute exercise with common equipment to perform and trying to figure that on my own with other OCR workouts was frustrating. As a mom, I really appreciate that I can workout on my own time, in my own gym, with my own equipment, so that I can still train like a badass without missing precious family time. Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

As I am writing this, I am 3 days away from my first OCR race of the season. I wasn’t supposed to race until the Georgia Spring Savage, but I had the opportunity to race in the Talladega Bonefrog and didn’t want to pass it up. The coaches reached out to meet to make sure I was feeling up to it with my hip issues and tailored my race week taper to ensure that I was well rested and ready to go for Saturday.

One thing that I wish I had worked on a little more during the past couple of months as I trained for these two upcoming races is my grip. The majority of work in the WODs do include lifts and exercises that require grip strength, but as a total new OCR athlete starting from ground zero, I probably needed a little more.

I did reach out to the coaches at LB and told them I think I could use more and low and behold, they gave me some tailored Grip work to do. Moral of the story is communication! I wish I had communicated my weakness in grip before, but I had been working on it a bit aside from LB but should have used the professional resources at my disposal (insert facepalm here). Lesson learned.

The great thing is that I have plenty of races this season to see how much I improve so I will be able to really see how I do this weekend with only a couple of months of training under LB and see how that translates on race day as compared to when I first started. To me, there is nothing more important than seeing the training translate to performance but the goal is just to have fun. So let’s see how I feel after my first OCR!

 

Whether you are new to OCR or a seasoned OCR athlete who has hit a plateau, head over to leaderboardfit.com to push your training to the next level.

Why My Wetsuit Played A Huge Role At World’s Toughest Mudder

There is something about a 24-hour race that you can never fully be prepared for. I could train harder, run faster, complete more pull-ups, and carry heavier things, but that doesn’t guarantee anything at World’s Toughest Mudder (WTM). Training is imperative to success, but there is a limit to what your physical prowess can provide. There are moments when you have to rely on our emotional and psychological strength to push you through, but even that gets tapped out at a certain point. Just like any race, there is utmost importance to prepare physically and psychologically, but unlike other races, gear plays an essential role in this 24-hour grind.

 

Coming into WTM for the fourth time, I knew what to expect, but there is only so much that prepares you for 24 hours of the unknown. Unlike previous years, I was competing in the Team Relay competition instead of the individual category. This would throw in a whole new dynamic to the once familiar race. Instead of slowly grinding my way throughout the race, I was tasked with racing hard for a short time and then stopping.

Here was the plan, start the race as a four-man team and then alternate two people every lap, minimizing pit time, until the wheels fell off. I was hoping that faster laps would allow me to wear a thinner wetsuit than previous years, knowing full well that things can go downhill quickly. I prepared my usual gauntlet of wetsuits and layers just in case. The plan was to start off in shorts and a t-shirt.
Once the sun went down, I switched into long compression gear. Then the Blegg Mitts and a windbreaker came on for a little more warmth. I knew that temperatures would quickly drop and more water obstacles at night meant that we would be cold and wet for the duration of the race. During previous years I wore full wetsuits ranging from 3/2mm to 5/3mm, often making it difficult to move. The relay calls for quicker laps, so I needed something that was warm enough, but less constricting than a full wetsuit. The plan was to use the Hyperflex VYRL 2.5mm Shorty Springsuit with a front chest zip and the 2.5mm Neosport Wetsuit Cap with an adjustable chinstrap from Wetsuit Wearhouse.

I wish I had more to tell you, but the truth is, this combination worked like a charm. Every lap, my teammate and I would start our lap in cold, wet gear. Putting those cold clothes on every lap added a whole new dimension of suck to WTM. Less than a mile into the lap, my body would warm up and it was off to the races. While the water temperature threw a wrench into many people’s plans, my layered outfit was perfect for staying warm on-course. When we finished a lap, we would quickly strip out of our wet clothes, throw on something warm, and try to recover for the next lap. While it would have been nice to have two wetsuits that I could alternate, this was a small wrinkle in the scheme of things. Plus, this is WORLD”S TOUGHEST MUDDER. It isn’t easy. While it was hard putting on wet clothes as we prepared for another lap, it didn’t rival the psychological ups and downs of the relay format.

All in all, it was a tough race. Starting and stopping throughout the night was a whole new challenge that I have never experienced. I was forced to stay loose while trying to recover in time for my next effort. My laps felt like an all-out sprint at times and it gave me a whole new experience at WTM. Our team managed to finish 2nd overall in the Team Relay category and I am so proud of my teammates and pit crew for helping us along the way. While Atlanta will bring a whole new challenge to WTM, I can only speculate that people will underestimate the conditions and forgo bringing a wetsuit. Don’t be one of those people. World’s Toughest Mudder is a race of unknowns, so always be prepared. I can’t wait to see all you crazies out there!

Planning and Training for World’s Toughest Mudder Success

World’s Toughest Mudder is a BIG THING. You can’t just show up and wing it. Success at WTM demands both careful planning and intelligent training, which is what this series will be about. Before submitting these articles, I thought I’d ask a guy I know what he considers to be the optimal way of approaching WTM. The good news is that his approach and mine were essentially the same. The bad news is that he was super concise, so I’m here to expand on it and flesh it out into usable tools and guidelines. Oh yeah, here’s what he said:

Think through every possible detail/angle carefully, practice it, then systematically kick ass. – Ryan Atkins


PLANNING


I am not one for clichés, but I can’t put it any better than these, so here is a short list of planning clichés :

  • If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” – a bunch of memes
  • No battle plan survives contact with the enemy.” – Helmut von Moltke
  • “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.” – Mike Tyson
  • Plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

When your plans meet the real WTM, the real WTM wins. Few things go exactly as planned. Mistaken assumptions chow down on your asses. The most brilliant plan loses touch with reality, and if you’re not careful you’ll follow it down the crapper.

World's-Toughest-Mudder-Planning-Invaders

OK, what’s the deal, Dobos? To paraphrase Hamlet: “to plan or not to plan, that is the question.” Well, the answer is a qualified “yes.” DO absolutely definitely plan thoroughly, but DO NOT place absolute reliance on your plan. Accept that your beautiful plan will start falling apart at some point during the event, likely much sooner and in more and shittier ways than you had anticipated. Make sure you are mentally and physically prepared for “plan B”, “plan C”, or just going into survival mode. Reality will not yield to your plans, so you must adapt to the actual circumstances at hand.

World's-Toughest-Mudder-Plan

The first step to planning is to understand as much as possible of what will go down in Atlanta next year at WTM. Do all the obvious things: watch videos of past WTMs, read race reports, go to WTM groups and pages online, look over maps of past WTM courses, etc. That will give you a good idea of what challenges will be presented to you. The other big thing you need to understand is exactly what you will be bringing to the show. Where is your fitness now? What are your strengths and weaknesses? How much improvement can you realistically expect in those by the time Atlanta rolls around? (That last refers to TRAINING, which I’ll come to later in this series)

World's-Toughest-Mudder-2016-course-map

As you can see, it’s very, VERY easy to get hopelessly buried in details, so you need to draw a line in the sand somewhere. Try to group things together into categories of challenges that you need to overcome for success.

The challenges presented by WTM can be boiled down to 3 big ones:
1. dealing with the cold and wet conditions

2. being on your feet and moving for 24 hours

3. completing as many obstacles as efficiently as possible

I have cleverly triaged those challenges in order of importance: 1 is to survive, 2 is to complete, and 3 is to perform. Number 1 can end your race prematurely. It has done so time and again, to rookies and veterans and elite racers. It is the first thing you need to figure out how to deal with because without it the rest of your grand plans are just so much fantasy.

World's-Toughest-Mudder-Cold-Wet-Tired

WTM Challenge #1: The Horrible Laws of Thermodynamics

Regardless of where and when WTM is held, it’s always cold. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t check and monitor the weather forecast as race-day approaches, but don’t let it lull you into a false sense of security. Every single person at WTM this year – racers AND crew – knew that the single biggest challenge, the #1 reason for DNFs, was going to be cold. Just like it was last year and the year before, and so onto into the mists of prehistory. However, knowing the problem is only half the problem. You need a solution or, preferably, several solutions.

Problem: you’re cold
Solution: dress warmly, with layers and stuff. No problem, right?

Well…not exactly. The other thing every single person knew was that you would be wet for pretty much the last 22 hours or so. Therefore that bitchin’ fleece hoodie you got yourself, far from keeping you warm, will be worse than useless once it’s soaked. That’s why you see almost everyone wearing wet-suits from late afternoon through to well after sunrise.

Problems: you’re cold and wet
Solution: get a wet-suit. Problem solved, right?

Nope. We need to understand the basics of heat transfer, and exactly what clothing can and cannot do for you. Time for a thought experiment…

World's-Toughest-Mudder-Campfire

 

Take 4 identical water bottles. Fill 2 of them with cold water, and 2 of them with hot water. Now go dig up the toastiest sleeping bag you have. Bring out that 800 fill -40C rated monster, the one that has you sweating inside of 12 seconds if you dare crawl into it in anything warmer than -20 conditions. If you don’t have one, borrow from a friend.

Place one cold water bottle inside the sleeping bag way down at the foot end of the bag. Place a hot bottle up near the head end of the bag. Place the other 2 bottles a fair distance apart on the floor outside the sleeping bag. BTW, this is happening in your living room, so the ambient temp is around 22C. Go re-watch 2 hours of your fave WTM coverage, then come back and check the temperatures of the water in the bottles. What do you think you’ll find?

<Spoiler Alert>Let’s start with the easy ones: outside the sleeping bag. Both of those should be pretty close to room temperature. Heat always travels from warmer to colder, so the hot bottle will have lost heat to the room, while the cold one will have absorbed heat from the room. Both bottles will be around 22C. Easy peasy. Now, what about the sleeping bag?

At first blush, it’s tempting to assume that the ones that were in the insanely warm sleeping bag would be warmed up. Sadly, first blush is dead wrong in this case. What you’d actually find is that the cold one stayed quite cold – much colder than room temperature – and the hot one stayed quite hot – much warmer than room temperature. This is because a sleeping bag is simply a thermal insulator. It neither heats nor cools, it simply insulates whatever is inside it from whatever is outside.

World's-Toughest-Mudder-Thermodynamics-Batman

Clothing, including wet-suits, are the same: they generate exactly 0 heat. None. Zilch. Bupkus. SFA. If you’re freezing and throw on a 20mm wet-suit with a dryrobe over top, it will NOT warm you up. At least, not quickly enough.

At this point, you may be asking “why wear anything at all?” Well, the reason wearing insulating clothing works is because your body is constantly generating heat. Even if you’re curled up in the fetal position in your crew tent, your body is still generating heat because it needs to keep things at around body temperature in order to function properly. In the above scenario, you will slowly warm up as the heat generated by your basal metabolic rate gets trapped inside the dryrobe/wet-suit combo until you eventually get toasty warm. You need to know how to speed this process up, so keep reading.

There are several ways to warm yourself up much faster. The most enjoyable one is called “shared body warmth”, and all I’ll say about it is that you had better know your crew very, very well. The most effective strategy when you are in your pit is to ingest something hot, like a bowl of hot oatmeal or steaming cups of coffee or soup. The next pit tactic is to pour hot (not scalding – be careful) liquid into your wetsuit. The most important way may be less obvious, but it is the most critical because you can do it throughout the event: MOVE.

World's-Toughest-Mudder-Sufferfests-Cold-Guy-at-Tough-Guy

The only way you can move is through your muscles doing work. Human physiology is laughably inefficient, and most of the feeble trickle of chemical energy that we manage to generate in order to move gets wasted as heat. This heat builds up until your core temperature starts to get too high, and your body starts dumping it by pumping blood (essentially like radiator fluid in this scenario) out to your skin and limbs. Your clothing traps some of this heat, creating a progressively warmer micro-environment right next to your body surface and voila: you warm up!

Your body knows this even if you don’t, and has come up with a fantastically inefficient pattern of muscle contractions to cope with cold stress. Inefficient at moving, but super-awesome at generating heat. It’s called shivering. Shivering is ok, but it’s exhausting and makes things like Operation hilariously impossible. Your goal is to spend muscular energy moving forward, not jittering madly in place, so work on moving forward as hard as you can. Conversely, if you know that you’ll be forced to go slowly, whether from exhaustion or injury, then dress more warmly.

Even with all of the above dialed in, there is still a big make-or-break challenge related to overcoming the wet coldness: the wetsuit. The next (much shorter) article will delve into the hows and whys and dos and don’ts of WTM wetsuits.

World's-Toughest-Mudder-Wetsuit-Crack-Memecenter.com

Life Insurance for the OCR Athlete by Health IQ

*****SPONSORED CONTENT*****

Article brought to you by Health IQ, Life Insurance for the Health Conscious

For Jeremy Cooper, the Spartan Race™ helped him drive his physical fitness further than he ever imagined was possible. “I have been committed to my health for most of my life, but having a goal helped push me past what I thought my limits were.”  Although fit, Jeremy wasn’t a runner, but at the start line of his first Spartan, he found himself facing 13.4 miles. “I had never thought that I could run more than a few miles, but decided to go for it.” Jeremy pushed himself, running nearly the entire distance while tackling the challenging obstacles of the course.

 

That first Spartan Race hooked Jeremy to all the thrills of obstacle course racing that we love—scaling walls, diving from high platforms, swift problem solving and leading groups to consensus-driven solutions. For an athlete like Jeremy who wasn’t used to running, training for the race course was also an obstacle to conquer. His hard work clearly paid off in physical fitness dividends and also, to his surprise, rewarded him financially as well.  

Like many people, Jeremy had a prior life insurance policy that grew to be too expensive over time and he had canceled it several years ago due to budgetary constraints.  But when his wife pointed out that their family was vulnerable because neither of them had life insurance,  Jeremy experienced an “Aha!” moment and knew he needed to protect his family. But finding affordable coverage turned out to be an obstacle in itself. While researching insurance Jeffery saw an ad for Health IQ on Facebook and decided to see what kind of deal he could get.

 

Health IQ has gathered science and data to convince insurance companies that health-conscious people, including obstacle course racers, deserve lower rates due to lower mortality risk. Regular high-intensity interval training can decrease the risk of early death from heart disease by 39% for men and by 51% for women.

 

Armed with this research, Health IQ licensed agent Kevin Keil helped Jeremy find a 30-year term life insurance policy that was a good choice for his family. The length of term life insurance is flexible, but is usually set for the amount of time the insured feels would protect a financial dependent. 30 years would cover Jeremy’s children from infancy through college.

 

Jeremy also found that the Health IQ team was comprised of health-conscious people, many of whom were athletes themselves. In fact, Health IQ had its own team of Spartan racers!  Jeremy appreciated that the Health IQ team recognized how Spartan Races pushed him to achieve peak physical fitness and celebrated that achievement by helping him find affordable protection for his family.

 

About Health IQ

Health IQ’s mission is to improve the health of the world by celebrating the health conscious through social and financial rewards. Founded in 2013 by a team of health-conscious entrepreneurs, Health IQ gathered research and data to convince top-rated, innovative insurance carriers that health-conscious people had lower mortality and deserve lower rates on life insurance. Health IQ is a licensed life insurance agency in all 50 states and has helped thousands of health-conscious people secure billions in insurance coverage. Learn more at HealthIQ.com

 

*****SPONSORED CONTENT*****

Spartan Goes to the Gym with New Spartan Strong Classes

Spartan Race is adding another product to its lineup: a studio-based fitness class called Spartan Strong, and it is partnering with Life Time Fitness to roll out this experience to athletes around the country.

Spartan is not the first race series to move into the fitness training world; last month Tough Mudder announced that its Tough Mudder Bootcamp gyms would be opening soon. Spartan’s approach is different. Rather than build from the ground up, it has developed a class that can be held at any gym with minimal equipment. The model is similar to, say, Zumba: coaches are trained and certified, and the class can be offered anywhere with adequate space and a sound system. At first these classes will be appearing at about 100 Life Time Fitness gyms around the country, and eventually, they will show up at any gym interested in offering the class.

Spartan pancake. No syrup.

The class lasts about an hour and consists mostly of cardio movements and body-weight strengthening. The only equipment needed is the Spartan “pancake,” which many of you will have met as you hauled one up and down a mountain in the course of a Spartan Race. The class breaks down into five phases: “Readiness” (think warm-up), “Stamina” (cardio), “Accountability,” “Tenacity” (it wasn’t exactly clear to me how those concepts translated into a class setting) and “Resilience” (cool-down).

I got to try the workout last week at the product launch in New York, and I will vouch for the fact that it gets your heart rate up quickly and consistently. I emerged sweaty and out of breath, good signs of an exercise class.

There were burpees (because, Spartan) and bear crawls, and the pancakes were used effectively. The classes are designed to be large, from 20 to 40 participants, and I was reminded of the exercise classes I took in the 90’s (please, don’t call it aerobics), where several dozen adults, led from the front, tried to move a great deal in a confined space without bumping into each other. This is not the same kind of atmosphere you get in your typical high-intensity interval training class or a CrossFit box.

Spartan is dedicated to ripping people off the couch and out of the house onto trails and mountains, so why are they going back inside? Because that’s where the people are, apparently.

Joe De Sena is determined to change the lives of 100 million people, and he has come to the conclusion that changing lives is more important than being a purist about how that gets done. If he can reach people by offering a class format rather than chasing people up a mountain, the outcome can be the same. His flexibility in this regard reflects a sincerity in his mission. A-roo.

While the Spartan Strong classes can exist as a stand-alone product, they are still part of the Spartan universe. Life Time will be integrating the class into participation at Spartan Races, and there will be periodic testing so that participants can track their fitness progress – think monthly tests to see how many burpees you can do in a minute.

How do you get to try Spartan Strong? By the end of 2018, it will be available at almost all Life Time Fitness gyms.

For those unfamiliar with the brand, Life Time is an upscale brand, comparable to, say, Equinox, or if you prefer, it’s part of the category of “gyms that smell nice.” They recently opened up their first New York City branch in a skyscraper on 42nd Street, and the setting is grand. For the launch, they set up a rope climb and a monkey bar rig so that the invited Spartan Pro athletes (Amelia Boone! Kevin Donoghue!) could strut their stuff next to the two rooftop pools.

Going forward, trainers will be able to sign up for the workshop that certifies them as Spartan Strong instructors and offer the class anywhere. The soundtrack and workouts are developed by experts at Spartan and Life Time and are distributed along with guidelines to keep the workouts fresh.

Spartan Strong is not the only way to get fit the Spartan way. In order to build the brand and/or change the lives of 100 million people, Spartan fitness products also include online classes on Daily Burn, the SGX program of certifying instructors, and a brick and mortar Spartan-branded gym at a hotel in Miami. These products are not going away. For those who want to get their fitness in a class setting, this is another option that is available and another gateway into the Spartan way of life.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Spartan and Life Time Transform Gritty Race Experience into New Intense Group Fitness Class—Spartan Strong

Exclusive class, launching at 100 Life Time destinations across the U.S. by 2018, helps participants discover their inner Spartan

 BOSTON, MA (August 9, 2017) –Inspired by Spartan’s world-renown obstacle race events, where competitors face fire, mud, and barbed wire, Spartan Strong, a new, intense group fitness class is debuting exclusively at Life Time destinations. Created by Spartan and Life Time®, Spartan Strong focuses on studio-based exercises that challenge the body and mind, helping individuals conquer life’s everyday challenges. More than 100 of Life Time’s premium athletic resort destinations across the country will offer the class, rolling out now throughout 2018.

“Spartans learn to overcome obstacles and achieve their goals on the race course, often doing more than they believe possible,” says Spartan Vice President of Training John Gauch. “Our goal is to bring that same sense of accomplishment to people off the course through Spartan Strong. Life Time’s shared philosophy and team of dedicated instructors, coupled with their impressive destinations, create a perfect collaboration as we make the world a healthier place and impact how people live healthy balanced lives.”

The high-intensity hour long journey will push participants to their limits and unleash their inner Spartan by increasing strength, endurance, and athleticism through a combination of resistance training, bodyweight moves, dynamic stretching and cardio-focused drills. With the help of the Spartan Pancake, a weight-based circular sandbag, the class will leave participants feeling invigorated, empowered, and better prepared to battle the trying tasks of daily life. Members will also be tested with periodic fitness challenges to measure their progress.

“With the explosive growth of obstacle course races, this first-of-its-kind, race course meets group fitness class brings our members the best of both worlds,” says John Reilly, President, Fitness and Nutrition Division, Life Time. “Whether training for a Spartan race or tackling everyday life, Spartan Strong will push participants’ mind and body to achieve optimal performance on and off the race course.”

Available to Life Time members as part of the Company’s Featured Format classes, Life Time’s Spartan Strong instructors—many of whom compete in Spartan Races—received rigorous training and certification by Spartan’s and Life Time’s team of experts.

ABOUT LIFE TIME® – HEALTHY WAY OF LIFE

Life Time® is a privately held, comprehensive healthy living, healthy aging and healthy entertainment lifestyle company that offers a personalized and scientific approach to long-term health and wellness. Through its portfolio of distinctive resort-like destinations, athletic events and corporate health services, the Healthy Way of Life Company helps members achieve their goals every day with the support of a team of dedicated professionals and an array of proprietary health assessments. As of August 9, 2017, the company operates 127 centers in 27 states and 35 major markets under the LIFE TIME FITNESS® and LIFE TIME ATHLETIC® brands in the United States and Canada.

 ABOUT SPARTAN RACE, INC.

Spartan Race is the world’s largest obstacle race and endurance brand, and the first in-sport to feature timing and global rankings. With more than 200 events across more than 30 countries in 2017, Spartan Race will attract more than one million global participants offering open heats for all fitness levels, along with competitive and elite heats. The Spartan Race lifestyle boasts a community of more than five million passionate social media followers, health and wellness products, training and nutrition programs, and a popular NBC television series, which has made obstacle racing one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Spartan Race events feature races at three distances, 3+Mile/20+ Obstacle “Sprint,” 8+ Mile/25+ Obstacle “Super” and 12+ Mile/30+ Obstacle “Beast,” culminating in the Reebok Spartan Race World Championship in Lake Tahoe, Calif. Visit http://www.spartan.com for more information and registration.