OCRWC Partners With Dream Team Television

2018 Obstacle Course Racing World Championships to Air Across Multiple UK Television Networks

The first broadcast of the 2018 Championships will air on the 27th of October on the UK’s Channel 4, with further broadcasts planned on additional networks including British Eurosport, Sky Sports, and more.

Today, Adventurey, LLC, producers of the Obstacle Course Racing World Championships (OCRWC), announced a partnership with Dream Team Television to produce programming for the 2018 Obstacle Course Racing World Championships. The program will air on the UK’s Channel 4, British Eurosport, Sky Sports, and other international networks.

“Obstacle Course Racing (OCR) has exploded in popularity over the past several years and is now recognized as a premier sport for professional and amateur athletes,” Adrian Bijanada, Adventurey Founder & CEO, said. “We’re excited for our athletes to showcase their skills and introduce OCR to sports fans around the world.”

The 60-minute recap of the event will follow both amateur and professional OCR athletes in the lead up to race day, as well as document the championship event as it unfolds.

“The OCRWC is a grueling test of athleticism unique to the sport of OCR” Bijanada said. “Our competitors are some of the world’s best all-around athletes. They possess exceptional strength, speed, endurance, and agility which will be on display to those watching the race.”

Competitors for the OCRWC must qualify for the event by meeting specific results criteria at other obstacle course races around the world.

“With the OCRWC, we believe we have created a unique and independent platform that celebrates the sport of obstacle course racing,” said Bijanada. “We can’t wait to show the world the exceptional nature of this sport’s community.”

This year’s OCRWC takes place from the 19th to the 21st of October outside London, England. Thousands of the world’s top athletes in the sport of OCR from more than 60 countries will compete for the title of World Champion in 3K, 15K, and Team Relay events.

The OCRWC will air on the UK’s Channel 4 on Saturday, the 27th of October. Following the debut broadcast, additional international networks will feature the program in their lineups with programming details announced as they become available.

For more information, please visit OCRWC.com, or contact Stacey Kennedy at stacey@adventurey.com.

About the Obstacle Course Racing World Championships
Founded in 2013, the OCR World Championships are the only truly independent global championships for the sport of Obstacle Course Racing. Its mission is to unify, promote, and increase participation in the sport of OCR while celebrating its athletes and community. Competing in the event requires athletes to qualify for a limited number of spots through a network of qualifying events. The 2017 competition drew more than 4,000 athletes from 67 nations to compete for cash prizes in individual Elite, Age Group, and Team competitions, making it one of the broadest and most diverse races in obstacle course racing history. For additional information, visit OCRWC.com.

About Adventurey
Founded in 2013, Adventurey is a leading innovator in the endurance sporting event market that produces and markets premier sporting events that offer unparalleled experiences for athletes and spectators. Adventurey’s portfolio of events include the Obstacle Course Racing World Championships, North American Obstacle Course Racing Championships, 24-Hour Enduro Obstacle Course Racing World Championships, South African Obstacle Course Racing Championships, and the Empire State Marathon. Learn more at Adventurey.com. For additional media inquiries, please contact Stacey Kennedy at stacey@adventurey.com.

About Dream Team Television
Dream Team Television was established in 1994 following a successful production of The Everest Marathon. In the following years, the team went from strength to strength, covering adventure and endurance events around the world for S4C, Transworld Sport, and SNTV.

Dream Team Television has since grown into one of the UK’s leading production companies specialising in Triathlon, adventure, and athletics programming. The company has a worldwide reputation for producing the highest quality programmes in this field.

Dream Team produces programmes on the top British Triathlons as well as Marathons, ultra-marathons, mass participation events and cycling.

Our client list is made up of top companies and organisations including IMG, Ironman, British Triathlon, One Step Beyond, Always Aim High, Activity Wales, Human Race, Welsh Athletics, Challenge and Men’s Health plus many others. For additional information, visit dreamteamtelevision.co.uk

Aston Down South West Super, Sprint and Hurricane Weekend 2018

Spartan returns, once again, to the Aston Down Airfield used by the RAF from the First World War. I have a love-hate relationship with this place, mainly stemming from my solo experience with the Spartan Super last year. Going into my first Super alone was certainly a daunting task and the aching, bruised body after certainly made it a day never to forget. This year, a little more of a seasoned racer and a little better prepared for what is to come, I have decided to return to Aston Down and be one medal closer to the Trifecta in 2018. This time, I’ve got friends.

“Every step you take gets you closer to the finish line”

Karl Allsop, Race Director at Spartan Race UK, ran his first Spartan Sprint at Bassingbourn Barracks in 2011. Karl spent some time talking with me about his love affair with Obstacle Course Racing that spawned from his first ever Spartan race. As Director of Race Operations, Karl has complete responsibility in the operational planning of Spartan Races within the UK.

 

The design of the Aston Down course, for Karl and his team, has really been a process of looking back on previous years and learning from them. I can tell that the course this year has been meticulously planned out, ensuring that the racers experience a challenging yet not impossible race that will really push them to their limits. “We really have had the benefit of being able to say, if we place this obstacle here, then what next? If we have the Atlas Carry here do we really want to be going into Bucket Brigade? Are our racers really going to be able to do it? But what we don’t want to do is sort of deflate our racers.” As a racer, it’s nice to know that those behind Spartan are interested in helping participants reach their goals even if it is in a painful, brutal way.

“Aston has become sort of synonymous with the ‘Death Valley’ it’s this valley that we flood with obstacles.”

I asked Karl how he felt this season, and the approach that has been taken to it is different from the last. “I think we have seen some great growth, not just for Spartan, but for the sport as a whole over the last few years. I think Aston South West is a great example of how we have seen it change and grow. The first year we had maybe just over a 1000 people for the race day. We then grew to just over 3000 last year and we’ve topped just over 4000 this year.”

As the numbers have grown, I really felt that Spartan Race has focused on listening to their racers and strived to make changes based on their experiences. “A lot of our obstacles have been upgraded for this race and the reason for that is that our racers are getting better, they’re getting faster, they’re getting stronger. It’s great that we now have to adapt to our racers”.

The desire that every racer will have the same experience when taking part in a Spartan Race is what drives the team to talk to the racers and spectators to get their views on what would make race day more enjoyable. Aston will improve on Spartan’s ‘rocking festival’ area where spectators and tired racers and finishers, can enjoy the Spartan atmosphere. It’s free to spectators and will even contain ‘festival obstacles’ to entertain throughout the day. “We spent a lot of time last year asking what do you want, what do you want to see, how do you want to do it? So this year we have more spectator areas and have designed the course a little differently just to give the spectators something to look at.”

And finally, an important part of enjoying the course rides a lot on the support you have around you. Not only the friends you run with but the encouragement you get from Spartan volunteers. My experience of these guys has been nothing but positive. I’ve seen many cheering, clapping and dancing the racers through the tough challenges that Spartan puts them through. “You get the guys who are just smiling, they’re laughing, they’re high fiving everyone you know there is mud flying everywhere and its infectious isn’t it?”

“A big focus this year has been on what does the racer actually want in terms of when they come to a Spartan Race? What do they want to see, what do they want to feel? And how do we slowly adapt and progress to that?”

A final round-up of Aston Down? The course layout for Spartan Race is always kept under tight wraps until race day but Karl was sure to let me know the gist of what to expect come Saturday. “If people want intensity, but they also want fun, then Aston is a great place to do it”. It’s going to be bigger and better than ever.

Aston did me right last year, it took me, chewed me up and spat me back out a better stronger racer. I’m glad to hear that Karl and his team have really taken these races up a notch and have done everything they can to make sure that those racing really get the most out of their time and out of themselves. Aston Down proves to be a show-stopping weekend of OCR magic and I wouldn’t miss it for the world.

There are limited spots available for this weekend’s South West Super, Sprint and Hurricane Heat in Aston Down, Gloucestershire. Visit http://www.spartanrace.uk to book your place and get further information.

Photo Credits: Epic Action Imagery (www.epicactionimagery.com)

Spartan Race Launches Irish Debut

 

‘NOVICE HURDLERS’ SET TO SPRING SURPRISE ON PUNCHESTOWN GRANDSTANDERS

 


One of world’s biggest sporting series, Spartan Race, launches Irish debut

Dublin racecourse forecast: Going will be ‘Soft to Very Muddy’ 
Spartan Sprint welcomes all newcomers: Sunday, 27 May 2018

 

 Grandstand crowds at Punchestown Racecourse, the home of Irish National Hunt Racing, may rub their eyes in disbelief when ‘novice hurdlers’ romp home up the final furlong this spring.

Organisers announced today the famous Co. Kildare course, 18 miles south of Dublin, is to stage one extra thrilling day’s racing in May – but cheering spectators won’t spot a single horse or jockey in the parade ring.

Instead, only TWO-legged, human runners will feature on the racecard, with the special day’s adrenaline-fuelled sport being hosted by the world’s leading Obstacle Course Racing company, Spartan Race. Now staging races in over 30 countries, the company is proudly making its debut in Ireland this year.

The use of riding crops will be strictly forbidden, and the going will officially be declared ‘Soft to Very Muddy’ as Punchestown’s equestrian fences are swapped for even tougher cross-country challenges. Runners will have to wade through muddy bogs, scale slippery, 7-foot ramps, clamber up 25-foot-high cargo nets, lug 10kg sandbags up steep hills, climb 15-foot ropes, crawl under barbed wire on their tummies, then leap a ‘fire jump’ finale over blazing logs as their Grandstand finish.

Nobody needs to be a thoroughbred to take part though, as the ‘Spartan Sprint’ on Sunday, May 27 is an ‘entry-level’ race suitable for beginners and all levels of fitness. The Sprint, Spartan Race’s shortest event, 5km+ (3 miles) and 20+ obstacles, is a firm favourite with both new and experienced racers. Spartan hosts 250 races worldwide attracting more than 5 million runners in under 10 years, and the fixture at Punchestown, near the county town of Naas, is expected to draw participants and family spectators from across Ireland.

With Dublin now one of Europe’s premier tourist destinations, organisers also expect the event to draw a wider international audience, with other sporting enthusiasts flying in from across Europe and the US.

Spartan Race Regional Director Sean Meehan, (now available for interview), who lives in County Fermanagh and helped plan the Punchestown event, said: “Like the horses before them, our racers will discover a fast, exciting racecourse that’s both challenging and diverse – plus water, mud, forest and rolling hills. Runners will head off cross-country, then return to a rousing Grandstand finish up the famous Punchestown final furlong.

“Spartan is the world’s biggest endurance brand and we’re thrilled that our debut Irish event will open up a new market for Ireland, locally hosting obstacle course racing, which is now also the fastest-growing participation sport in the world. The timing of our Ireland race is perfect as it fits the current trend towards fitness, wellbeing and adventure sports. There’s a boom in adventure sports in Ireland, particularly along the West Coast, with trail running, kayaking and mountain biking. I hope they’ll all welcome Spartan with open arms.

 

“More than 1 million participants in over 30 countries ran a Spartan Race in 2017, and absolutely anybody can do one – people of all shapes and all sizes. There is no prior fitness required: you will get to the finish line.”

 

Meehan, an endurance athlete who helps stage Spartan races across Europe, the Middle East and Africa, added: “We also attract elite athletes, but beginners receive lots of helping hands and assistance on the course. The atmosphere and camaraderie are awesome. Crossing the fire jump in front of the famous Punchestown Grandstand, receiving your Spartan medal round your neck, and enjoying the buzz from the festival, will create a very special day out for racers and spectators alike.”

Obstacle course racing is now a worldwide craze, attracting millions of runners and keep-fit enthusiasts, including 5km and 10km racers, half marathoners and marathoners seeking a fresh challenge. Contrary to the misconception that the sport is dominated by testosterone-fuelled men, 40 per cent of Spartan Race runners are women. Obstacles are always kept top secret on race day on purpose to surprise racers. Failure to complete an obstacle incurs a compulsory set of 30 ‘burpees’, or squat-thrusts, meted out irrespective of gender.

A packed Spartan Race 2018 programme of 30 UK races will run until October – a fixture calendar increased by a record 50 per cent from 2017, reflecting booming British interest in the sport (now one of the UK’s fastest-growing). This year, around 30,000+ people are expected to run Spartan Races, which are named after the fearless Ancient Greek warriors. Punchestown has hosted major music festivals in the past, welcoming bands such as Kings of Leon, R.E.M., The Killers and the Red Hot Chili Peppers, but has never before hosted a Spartan Race.

There are three main types of Spartan Races, a Sprint (5km+), a Super (12km+) and a Beast (22km+). An average racer takes around 2 hours 40 minutes to complete a Sprint. Some elite racers can manage it in 40 minutes.

Spartan Race will also be hosting a Spartan Kids race at Punchestown. One of a record 11 Spartan events scheduled for junior competitors this year, it is open to children aged 4-13. They run a 1.5km course and youngsters must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian onsite.

To register for the Dublin event visit http://bit.ly/2DvIJv3

SPARTAN RACE SCHEDULE 2018: SPARTAN SPRINTS (5KM+ / 3 MILES; 20+ OBSTACLES)

Spartan Sprint South-east – Sunday, 8 April: St Clere, London Road (A20), Wrotham, Kent TN15 7NS

Spartan Sprint Dublin – Sunday, 27 May: Punchestown Racecourse, near Naas, Dublin, County Kildare

Spartan Sprint South-west – Sunday, 24 June: Aston Down, Aston Down Airfield, Gloucestershire GL6 8HR

Spartan Sprint Midlands – Sunday, 15 July: Marston Lodge, Marston Trussell, Market Harborough, Northamptonshire LE16 9TT

Spartan Sprint Scotland – Sunday, 16 September: Kinnoull Hill & Deuchny Woods, South Inch, Perth PH2 8AX

Spartan Sprint Windsor – Sunday, 7 October: Rapley Farm, Bracknell Road, Bagshot, Berkshire GU19 5PN

 

For full details of all UK Spartan Race events in 2018, visit www.spartanrace.uk

Follow Spartan Race UK on social media:

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/SpartanRaceUK or https://www.facebook.com/SpartanRaceIreland/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spartanraceuk

Twitter: @spartanraceuk

OCRWC Announces 2018 Venue!

Obstacle Course Racing World Championships Announces 2018 Location in the United Kingdom

New York, NY (November 6, 2017) – Adventurey, the parent company of the world’s first and only independent obstacle racing world championship today, announced details for 2018 Obstacle Course Racing World Championships in London, England October 19 – 21, 2018. The premiere event of the obstacle course racing (OCR) season will bring a truly global obstacle racing experience to the English countryside. The fifth year of the event will celebrate the best professional and age group competitors from around the world with athletes from over sixty-five nations expected to participate.

Race weekend will feature a 3K Short Course Championships on Friday, 15K Standard Distance on Saturday, and Team Relay Competition on Sunday, each showcasing the best racers from around the world. The event will build upon an already spectacular permanent obstacle course in Essex to create an international village, a diverse course, and an unparalleled experience for athletes, their supporters, and spectators. ͞

“After four years in North America, we knew that to truly be a global championship we would need to move outside the continent. Our team spent more than a year vetting various venues around the world and found this venue offered a unique opportunity to build something distinctly international, while bringing obstacle course racing back home to the UK,” said Adventurey CEO, Adrian Bijanada. “Athletes and their families should expect a world-class course showcasing global obstacle course racing brands, a diverse international village, and contributions from partners that are a reflection of the worldwide obstacle racing industry.”

“We’re honored & excited to be chosen to host the OCR World Championships in 2018. Obstacle racing originated in the UK so we’re very proud to be the showcase venue for this world-class event. Our multi-award winning courses & obstacles will allow the World’s team to create a truly epic athlete experience. We’re looking forward to working together & welcoming everyone,” said James Parrish Race Director at Nuclear Races, which will host the 2018 event.

Full details on how to qualify can be found on the OCR World Championships website. This year over seventy-five race series are set as qualifiers representing over forty countries. Additionally, for the first-time since its inception, athletes will have the ability to purchase “entry protection” insurance for the event. This will provide athletes the opportunity to receive a refund of their entry fee in the event of injury or other significant life events which may prevent them from attending the world championships.

“We recognize that events often happen in life and athletes plan the entire season around the OCR World Championships. The new registration insurance adds a level of protection for athletes when making the critical decision to register for our races. We hope this helps to set an industry standard moving forward” said Rachelanne Gladden, Director of Athlete Services.

The new location and new venue for OCR World Championships are set to create a fresh and vibrant OCR World Championship experience for returning athletes and open the door for a new contingent of global athletes with the move.

About the Obstacle Course Racing World Championships

Created by Adventurey, LLC, the Obstacle Course Racing World Championships is the first and only independent championship event in Obstacle Course Racing and requires athletes to qualify for a limited number of spots through a network of qualifying events. Designed to celebrate the athletes within the sport, the 2017 competition drew over 4,000 athletes from over 67 nations to compete for cash prizes in individual Elite, Age Group, and Team competitions, making it one of the broadest and most diverse races in obstacle course racing history. For more information, visit www.ocrworldchampionships.com.

About Nuclear Races

Nuclear Races are award-winning obstacle races on permanent farmland nestled just outside London in the county of Essex, UK. Founder & Race Director of Nuclear Races James Parrish is the fourth generation landowner of the 2,000-acre farm. Nuclear’s first race was in 2011 utilizing the natural terrain, obstacle build expertise & highly organized logistics needed to deliver obstacle races. The mission was to make fitness fun, achievable & while enjoying the outdoors at it’s best. Nuclear has an established & growing community who enjoy race-days & training throughout the year.

Media inquiries may be sent to Margaret Schlachter, Media Director – Margaret@ocrwc.com.

 

Tough Mudder UK Southwest 2017

 Tough Mudder South West UK 2017 – Badminton Estate

Last year, I joined a number of my work colleagues in my first ever Tough Mudder. I have always been skeptical about this event. I had previously taken part in two Spartan races, Invncbl, and some other minor obstacle course races in my area. For some reason, Tough Mudder had never appealed to me. I think I felt like I didn’t want to be tortured for a distance of 10 miles for a headband. But in the end, I mostly decided to take part because it was an excuse to do something ridiculous with a bunch of my friends.

 

All it took was the Kiss of Mud and I was hooked.

 

On the day, it actually took our team an unexpectedly long time to get through that first Tough Mudder, but I really felt that we took ‘team effort’ to a whole new level. At every obstacle, we waited for all of our crew to join us before moving on. From the Arctic Enema to Everest, we helped each other tackle the next nightmare whilst covered in mud and freezing cold (cheers Britain).

 

For weeks after, pictures circulated the office and we laughed at how epically we failed at some of the obstacles. We reminisced about how I got dropped on my back, how my legs cramped endlessly and how my manager almost chickened out of ‘Electroshock Therapy.’ It wasn’t long until I found myself wanting to do the whole damn thing again.

I thought everyone had shared my insane love of this form of torture. I was wrong. When the time came, I sent the obligatory chirpy email around the office attempting to recruit members for my team. Much to my dismay, big fat “no way!” responses were all I got.

Crap. I had spent the year training for Spartans and my ultras, thinking that I would be ready for Tough Mudder when it came to it… well at least I would be ready for a team challenge.  I slowly realised that I was going to have to go it alone.

Tough Mudder relies heavily on teamwork. This was something I had made great use of in 2016. And now, I would be going it alone. I hated the idea but was determined that despite my obvious lack of a team, I would do the race.

So the day came, I woke up bright and early ready for some mud.

Getting signed up for parking was easy (dare I say expensive, £10) Editor’s note: roughly $13 USD. Registration on the day was pretty simple, just filled in a few forms and was on my way. I was given a standby wristband as I wasn’t on a specific wave. So I took my time as there were waves leaving every 15-30 mins. I got in line for standby but wasn’t too impressed with the wait. We were in line for a good hour and a half before being let in. People in the ‘pig pen’ consisted of latecomers, those who were running the race again (absolute nutters), and those who were running for magazines or websites. Still, it took too long.

Finally, we got into a wave and took part in the obligatory workout and pep talk and pledge recital.

Then we were off!

If there is one thing that I have learnt from this year’s Tough Mudder, it was that I absolutely LOVE this stuff.

The course eased you into a grueling 10 miles of blood sweat and tears. It started with a short jog to ‘Skidmarked’ which really got us into the spirit of ‘leave no man (or woman) behind’.

On to Bail Bonds, Kiss of Mud, and Pyramid Scheme. The lack of helping hands at Pyramid Scheme made it difficult to do it properly. Was a bit disappointed. On the Hero Walls is where I really showed some grit. I was devastated last year to be dropped by a team mate. I made it up one wall this time. Small victories.

Arctic Enema came just after mile 3. For which I was eternally grateful. Plenty of time to recover, rather than be freezing cold.

Agustus Gloop or Snot Rocket (Legionnaires) were new to 2017 and were a heck of a lot of fun. Next came Devil’s Beard. I didn’t really get this one last time and still don’t (not my favourite).

Blockness Monster was just as fantastic as before, despite the water being just a little too deep for most people to even get a grip on the floor to help push it over. We relied heavily on the tall mudders to get it to the tipping point.

The Liberator, Birth Canal, and Lumberjacked. All solid obstacles. I didn’t stick around, I just got it done and moved on.

The course was very well planned out. 2016’s layout left a lot of next-to-impossible obstacles. In comparison, last year’s course was poorly planned out leaving many obstacles too slippery to have a good go at.

Last year,  Funky Monkey saw even the fittest racers fall at the first rung. This year was far more fun and more manageable that even I, EVEN I, got halfway across before face planting the water and almost winding myself. All part of the fun, hey?

‘Mud Mile’ was one of the highlights of my previous Tough Mudder experience. I loved every second this year but wished it was longer. Definitely was not a mile long – last year was longer. The racers really lived up to the Tough Mudder pledge in this one though. It was hard not to stop and help out your fellow mudders. Everyone really just wanted everyone else to make it to the end. My faith in humanity was restored.   

‘Hold Your Wood’ saw me joining forces with a team I was waiting in line with. What I really liked about this race was that despite me completing the obstacle with another team, there was no obligation on either party to then stick together. A quick chat, get the job done, a round of “well-done mate and good luck” and off they ran.

So, that was 9 miles down. 1 mile to go. I was getting TIRED.

With just Hero Carry, Everest, and Electric Shock left, I was getting worried. Everest was my nemesis from last year. It was one of the few obstacles that I just could not do no matter how hard I tried.  The Hero carry came and went without too much trouble, and although I wasn’t looking forward to it, I knew I could do Electro Shock Therapy.

But Everest…. I didn’t want to stand in line for 20 minutes, freezing and covered in flies, to try countless times to then have to walk around, ashamed of myself. As I rounded the corner from the Hero Carry I could see it. Thank goodness there were no queues and I had well and truly dried off from the epic face plant at Funky Monkey. I was ready for this.

Took a decent run at it, reached two hands (yes), held on (YES), swung my leg up and some other tough mudder (an absolute legend) grabbed it and pulled me up. YES!!!! I was beyond ecstatic (cue the awkward fist pump to myself – but I didn’t care). I ran up the final straight toward the finish line grinning like a goon. Just one more obstacle to go.

I had a choice, as a legionnaire I could choose Kong or Electroshock Therapy, I knew at this point my arms were shot and if I failed the last obstacle I would be devastated so I took on Electroshock Therapy instead. As I ran through I thought, “Dammit, should have done Kong!” I regretted calling all my teammates wimps last year for avoiding Electroshock Therapy last year. This round nearly floored me. I started running and got a shock that propelled me into a hay bale (in the course I might add). Face full of mud I straightened up only to get a shock in the face. These pictures are going to be incredible. Only a couple more strides to go. Inches from the finish, I sucked it up and rubbed some dirt in it. Crossed the line and was presented with some well-deserved rewards.

This Tough Mudder was definitely 10 miles of blood (bloody elbow), sweat (so much sweat) and tears (promise, there was just some mud in my eye). Epic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Tough Mudder and Author