Terrain Race: Adding Sundays And Offering Payment Solutions

Yesterday, Obstacle Racing Media was contacted by Terrain Race via our Instagram account by their new head of public relations. It appeared as though whoever was sending the DM’s was not aware of the prior issues with their customers, and we wanted to see if we could get to the bottom of them. We exchanged several messages before agreeing to send an email.

 

Here are the responses from the email :

ORM: How much longer will the free promotional race last?

TR: The length of the free registration promotion is TBD. People are really excited about it, and we’re selling out cities left and right.

ORM: Which cities will now have races on both days?

TR:  Second dates are added after a first date has filled up. Capacity is around 8,000 per day, or around 16,000 for Saturday and Sunday combined.

We have more dates that are near selling out, so news of additional second dates should come out soon. Here’s a current list of weekends where the first date has sold out and we’ve added a second day:

Miami (Feb 9-10) (First event of 2019) Orlando (Feb 16-17) Phoenix (Feb 23-24)
Pensacola (Apr 6-7) Tucson (Apr 6-7) Fort Worth (Apr 13-14) Houston (Apr 20-21)
Maryland (Apr 27-28) San Jose (Jun 8-9) Hartford (Jun 29-30) New York (Jul 27-28)
Portland (Aug 10-11) Boston (Aug 17-18) Minneapolis (Oct 5-6)Jacksonville (Oct 26-27)
Irvine (Nov 16-17)

ORM: When will the 2018 podium athletes be paid?

TR:  The payment problems for competitors is something I just found out about. There’s been a lot of turnover in staff, so I’m going to streamline things going forward. Anyone who is owed money can email me at this address and I’ll get their checks processed. All I need is their name, mailing address, what event they competed in, their place, and division.

We also reached out to Dustin Dorough who we spoke with for the September article to find out if he is still involved with Terrain Race. As of press time, we have not heard back.

Terrain Race New Orleans 2018 – A Lackluster Event

Terrain Race New Orleans

On November 17th, 2018 Terrain Race held their first event in New Orleans, Louisiana at the NOLA Motor Sports Park. The weather was an optimal chilly but not cold temperature. The venue had received some rain making the flat terrain muddy and more challenging. Nature’s conditions were optimal for OCR. Sadly, the race crew themselves didn’t seem to be in the same condition. The obstacles were fun. The course was designed decently. However, poor volunteer direction, attitude, and organization issues drug down what could have been an ideal event considering that Louisiana doesn’t have many these days.

Registration

The volunteers and staff at registration were helpful and nice. They kindly explained that they were having issues with their system so there would be no timing chips. They would simply write down our time by bib number. I understand timing costs money. However, here’s the issue with timing the old fashioned way at an OCR. I nearly lost my flopping paper bib several times and had to take focus off of my race to make sure I didn’t. I suppose had I marked myself this may have helped, but timing chips are just better for all of us.

After registration stepping into the venue itself was not bad. Everything was set up in clear view. They actually had music playing, but morale seemed to be a bit low from the crew. I understand that OCR events are really hard work. However, the main reason people participate is to get excited and pumped. They want to accomplish something and feel great about it. Again, I’ve seen worse morale, but for a company that was once beginning to step into the upper echelon of OCR events, Terrain has got to step up the morale and direction of volunteers.

You Have to Make them Want it

This leads us to our next issue. I know not everyone can afford Coach Payne, but it would be nice to have something more at the take off than “3….2… 1… go…” exactly like that. Maybe I’ve been spoiled by other races, but I feel like getting everyone pumped to go at the starting line is one of the most important aspects of the race. This announcement for the elite men’s wave take off seemed to mirror the attitude of the majority of volunteers. I felt like he should have said “It’s November, can we just get this over with… go.” This is not a commentary on this individual so much as the entire morale of the crew.


Confusion

On that note, the morale of volunteers on the course was a bit lackluster as well. Not only were all of the elites sent down the course backward, but many volunteers seemed unaware of what exactly participants were to do at certain obstacles. They seemed to feel standing at the obstacle sufficed. However, I will say kudos to the guy at the tire drag. He did a very good job instructing participants as well as encouraging them.

This confusion of sending racers the wrong way caused big issues for the women’s elite heat which should not have happened. After the issue was discovered, the staff decided to send the open waves the correct way. Well, if you are an elite female and you see backwards arrows and start to run INTO open wave competitors what would you do? You obviously assume you are lost and end up doubling back unnecessarily.

For som,e this may not seem like a big issue, but when you have trained hard and want to test yourself it is. Even if you don’t plan on making top ten, showing yourself how far you’ve come is VERY important to people who have worked hard day in and day out for this chance. To have it scrapped because of simple poor direction by a misinformed volunteer is quite tragic. I’ve seen worse, but this severely detracted from the race experience for many competitors.

Monkey See, Monkey Swing, Monkey Climb

One of the highlights of this race was the obstacles themselves. I have to say the crew did a great job keeping with the monkey theme of the race which I’ve always thoroughly enjoyed. The obstacles made a step up from last year in difficulty and in fun. Terrain did not create anything wholly original. What they did though was take OCR staples and mold them to fit their brand and theme. The course featured a nice big cargo. Competitors tackled a decent, short force 5 rig that only had two detrimental features. The second half of the rig had foot rings. I believe these were added to decrease difficulty and allow open runners more stability. They just caused more chaos.

Lanes were so close that stepping in these rings would just cause you to swing into the competitor next to you. This just made things awkward. Starting the rig with the ball grip was an interesting choice that threw off many. My main issue again with this obstacle though was volunteer direction. After many of the lead elites came through, others racers were being allowed to grab the top rail and shimmy across rather than utilizing the awkward foot rings. Plain and simple: this just isn’t fair.

Other Monkey swinging obstacles included a well put together Tarzan swing rig with large ropes and rings and very well done monkey bars over water. Monkey strength obstacles included a tire flip, tire drag, a concrete block drag, and a short, light sandbag carry. The most interesting addition to the strength aspect of the race was a sledgehammer obstacle where competitors had to hit a tire to a specified point and back. This was fun, but pretty awkward with piles of grass in certain lanes and wet sledges. I feel like a certain race company does this obstacle far better, but I won’t name any names. You know who you are.

The rest of the course was full of mud which taxed the running of many competitors. This was nice considering there is absolutely zero elevation in New Orleans. The finishing obstacle was well placed and well put together. Competitors first had to work their way up an angled balance board onto a horizontal cargo net. They then got to twirl elegantly (or plop down not so gracefully) from a fireman’s pole and cross the finish line to be greeted and congratulated by fellow competitors. All in all, I would give the obstacle portion of the race the highest point in this review.

 

Post Race

I would love to say the awards ceremony went perfectly. I would love to say the crew’s morale pepped up. I would love to say there was so much to do in the festival area afterwards. However: it didn’t, they weren’t, and there wasn’t.  There was an issue of who actually came in as the third female. The woman listed as third admitted she did NOT complete an obstacle, This contributed to the bad organization and direction issue. I would like to congratulate those top finishers pictured below.

The kids race was the highlight after the other heats. The kids had a great time. I will admit it was one of the better kids races I have seen. However, afterwards, there were no vendors, no activities, no food trucks. There was simply nothing to do. It honestly felt like Terrain was sort of like, “Ok, you came and raced now leave so we can too.”

Granted some could argue the festival isn’t important, but for those who drive a good distance the least you could do is have actual hoses. Racers were using the valve of a water truck to clean up.

There is Potential

I feel that if Terrain comes under better management next year they can be a competing race company again. The theme, the obstacles, and the venues they have accessed all have potential. The main issue they seem to have is organization.  I would hate to see such good obstacles and a good brand go down the drain because of a lack of organization and direction. So here’s to hoping Terrain can work out the kinks in their company and come back for 2019 stronger and more fun than ever!

Asheville Spartan Super 2018

Every year for the last three years, I have made the nine-hour drive to tackle the Asheville-Black Mountain course. Over the past three years, the Ashville course has consistently ranked in difficulty at the highest level. In comparison to other courses, it’s put in the same category as Killington and Wintergreen.  The terrain and elevation provide a physically and mentally tough course, one that provides challenges to the strongest OCR athletes and pushes many past their limitations.

With that in mind, I drove to Ashville this year with a hopeful mindset. Each year I have managed to improve my time and overall performance and this year I had the same intentions. In typical Asheville fashion, just parking on race day was a difficult task. The rain had been falling hard for the last few weeks and the parking lot was a muddy mess with many Spartans stopping to help push out vehicles and navigate to safer parking.

Standing in the start line corral, feeling the normal butterflies and anxiousness that one faces staring at a monumental task, I took a deep breath, shouted AROO, and took off running to face the rugged terrain.

The course began much like years before, swooping hard right and heading towards the cold streams that run throughout the mountain. Soon I was jumping into the cold water and maneuvering around the slippery rocks and divots. Vertical Cargo and Plate Drag were the very first obstacles we faced. I really enjoyed the cargo climb and the way they used the terrain.

Cargo Climb Plate Drag

6ft wall followed by 8ft wall and Z-wall were the next obstacles we faced. The new design on Z-wall provided increased difficulty and many athletes were forced to do burpees in several inches of muddy water.

Z-Walls

Moving forward we faced lots of climbing and navigating muddy terrain, the rain made this particular course that much more difficult and the climbs alone were taking many Spartans a great deal of time.

Technical Terrain

After a few miles of climbing we were brought down the hill and close to the festival area. Here we faced the multi-rig and several other Spartan favorites including tire flip and dunk wall.  The dunk wall was extra gross and left us all orange and muddy.

Circling out of the festival area and heading back up the mountain we began another ascent. Most of the climbs and ascents were in areas where it was nearly impossible to actually run. Rather Spartans moved in a march up the side of the mountain. One thing to mention about this venue is the amazing views. While the climb is rugged, the view from the top is absolutely breathtaking.

Mountain View

Several miles of climbing up and back down was next; stopping only for the incredible views or next obstacle tends to be the right of passage for any Spartan who tackles the Asheville Spartan course. Adjacent to Cargo Climb we came upon a newer Spartan obstacle similar to a great wall with rock grips. The rock grips were muddy and made the obstacle very difficult but equally fun.

Great Wall

Similar to years past, the last mile or so of the course brought us back down the mountain and into the festival area to finish out the last few obstacles. First, a long barb wire crawl with many spectators and finishers watching and cheering us all on. Next, the spear throw and Hercules Hoist tried our reserves.  The last few obstacles and finish line were in the heart of the festival area. It was a lot of fun to have so many cheering you on as you finished this grueling and laborious course. Jumping the fire and smiling for the customary photo danced in my memory as I collected my medal and shirt.

I do, however, feel obligated to mention that when the small rain storm rolled in during the afternoon heats, many racers were taken off of the course with no medal or finisher shirt. The Spartan Staff at this particular event (I’ve been to many and never experienced this) chose to yell, scream and curse at racers to get out of the festival area. I was very surprised by the unprofessional display and lack of organization they showed over such a small storm; by the time I had trudged back to my car the rain had stopped and the clouds had cleared.

However, outside of the storm and festival uproar, overall the 2018 Asheville Spartan Super did not disappoint; it was the perfect combination of the 2016 and 2017 courses. I am looking forward to the next event…AROO!

Spartan and CRAFT Sportswear Partner to Create OCR-Specific Apparel

Press Release

Spartan and CRAFT Sportswear Partner to Create High-Performance Apparel
Specifically Designed for Obstacle Course Racing

CRAFT Sportswear Named “Official Performance Apparel and Footwear” of Spartan

CLICK ABOVE TO PLAY VIDEO

BOSTON (March 29, 2018) – Spartan and CRAFT Sportswear have entered a global partnership, naming the leader in technical performance apparel as “official performance apparel and footwear” of the world’s largest obstacle race and endurance brand. The multi-year partnership will see the two brands developing the first high-performance technical apparel for the rising sport of Obstacle Course Racing (OCR). CRAFT will be applying the same scientific techniques and sport-specific knowledge it uses in developing Olympic-caliber performance apparel for World Tour cycling teams and Olympic cross-country skiers as well as runners and athletes at all levels. CRAFT is currently available in more than 39 countries, while Spartan has more than 200 races across more than 30 countries around the world.

“The growth of Spartan has created a competitive field of elite OCR athletes who require technical apparel that allows for maximum performance,” said CRAFT Sportswear North America CEO Eric Schenker. “For decades, CRAFT has engineered ergonomically superior products for some of the best athletes in the world, and we’re excited to be the first company to apply that same sport-specific knowledge and research towards developing the first-of-its-kind performance apparel for Spartan athletes. CRAFT is for Olympic Champions and everyday heroes and anyone that finishes a Spartan race has certainly earned that title!”

The OCR-specific “Powered By” CRAFT line of Spartan apparel and footwear is currently under development at the company’s sports science laboratory in Sweden. Spartan athletes face elements that require full functional movement and, at times, extreme temperatures. With just milliseconds on the line between elite finishers, CRAFT’s team of designers and technicians pay strict attention to detail, with every stitch and seam
meticulously placed to address the ergonomic and thermal needs of obstacle racers.

Having recently introduced the brand’s performance footwear in Europe, CRAFT’s all-terrain shoe for Spartan athletes will be its US footwear debut. The first-of-its-kind shoe will be designed specifically for the obstacles and natural elements athletes face on the OCR trail. The “Powered By” line will roll out in early 2019, with cobranded apparel from CRAFT’s existing training line launching in Summer of 2018.

Spartan events focus on sport and athleticism, pushing the bodies and minds of competitors to the limit across miles of unforgiving terrain while they conquer signature obstacles such as the Spear Throw, Inverted Wall, Monkey Bars and Barbed Wire Crawl.

“CRAFT has a proven track record for engineering the best functional apparel for endurance sports, and we’re excited to team up with a global brand that shares our passion for performance and competition to develop the first Olympic-caliber OCR-specific apparel and footwear,” said Spartan Founder and CEO Joe De Sena. “With intense competition unfolding at each race, and athletes pushing themselves to the limit, the CRAFT
‘Powered By’ line is a much-needed addition and step forward for the sport as we continue to attract global brands developing products specifically for our race and fan community.”

Most recently, CRAFT apparel was worn by Team USA Olympians Jessie Diggins and Kikkan Randall when they took home the gold in cross country skiing during the 2018 Winter Games. In addition, CRAFT sponsors a number of other elite athletes and professional teams across the globe in Cross Country Skiing, Cycling, Triathlon, Soccer and Track & Field. Spartan has more than one million annual participants and has seen more than 5 million athletes cross the finish line since it was founded in 2010.

About CRAFT

CRAFT is a Swedish brand specializing in clothing for endurance sports where performance and comfort are crucial for a good result. Combining a true love for endurance sports with a genuine textile heritage and a dedicated organization that dares to think big, we design, develop and manufacture cutting-edge apparel and accessories for Olympic champions and everyday heroes. Visit www.craftsports.us.

About Spartan

Spartan Race is the world’s largest obstacle race and endurance brand, and the first in-sport to feature timing and global rankings. With more than 200 events across more than 30 countries in 2018, Spartan will attract more than one million global participants offering open heats for all fitness levels, along with competitive and elite heats. The Spartan Race lifestyle boasts a community of more than five million passionate social media
followers, health and wellness products, training and nutrition programs, and a popular NBC television series, which has made obstacle racing one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Spartan Race events feature races at three distances, 3+Mile/20+ Obstacle “Sprint,” 8+ Mile/25+ Obstacle “Super” and 12+ Mile/30+Obstacle “Beast,” culminating in the Spartan World Championship in North Lake Tahoe, CA. Visit spartan.com for more information and registration.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jonathan Fine, 781.248.3963, jonathanf@spartan.com

Chicago Terrain Race

 

Terrain Race Chicago

The Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, Illinois played host to the second annual Terrain Race on September 30th. After the collapse of a rig the previous year at this same location I was curious to check out the event again and was pleased to see the craftsmanship of the obstacles was significantly upgraded. All the obstacles felt solid and safe which allowed athletes to really push themselves without worry on the flat and fast course.

The choice of 5k or 10k was offered during registration with a higher fee charged for the 10k, but only the 5k was timed slightly upsetting those who signed up for the competitive 10k. Racers who paid for the 10k could run a second untimed lap if they chose to do so and an unlimited lay option was offered.

Registration took a little time as only two lines check-in lanes were open, one for elite and one for open class. Terrain positioned a volunteer at each obstacle but the knowledge of the rules at some of the more difficult obstacles left some elite racers shaking their heads in frustration. Personally, I feel that all races should identify where their tougher or more confusing obstacles are located and spend extra time making sure that the volunteer at that location knows exactly what’s required for obstacle completion as this would make for a much smoother race.

Plenty of restrooms were available in the lots surrounding the speedway and in the festival area. Parking in those lots set you back 10 dollars and was an easy walking distance of the registration tent.

The Course

Terrain starts their race in a unique and chilly way. Three swimming pools were filled up waist deep with freezing water. This served as the starting corral and proved to be a great way to start off a race as athletes were already subjected to the mental and physical punishment of the cold before the race even started!

After emcee Lashay Marks released us from the Pit of Despair athletes were led through the speedway grounds and over a 4 and 6-foot wall to thin out the herd some before hitting a tall wall with a rope to assist you up and over. This was the first location I noticed a racer backup as athletes had to wait their turn for an opportunity to grab a rope to conquer the wall.

Back now on the mowed grass field, Terrain led racers to a rope climb with a bell tap at the top provided the first grip strength test. This led to the lone muddy area along the course as terrain used a series of tubes, water pits, and mud mounds to get racers dirty.

A very short jog away was a yoke with a car tire attached to each side which athletes placed across their shoulders for a short distance. I’m not sure where this obstacle was supposed to start and stop.  There was a flag a short distance away for athletes to go around but there was no apparent start/stop point given. Since there were not enough yokes to go around an athlete had to wait for someone to finish and pass their yoke to the next person in line. This was another obstacle backup which frustrated those worried about their time and was one of the few obstacles with no volunteer guidance.

Obstacles

Making our way now to the speedway stadium Terrain set up a twice up and back tractor tire flip where athletes once again had to wait their turn for a chance to complete the obstacle. A few more tires located here in the future and the issue would be solved.

Terrain next used the speedway stairs to their advantage with two climbs to the top. One with a Wreckbag, and one without separated by a 5-gallon bucket carry with maybe 3 gallons of water inside each bucket. Heading back out from the parking lot to the grass a tire slam with a sledgehammer for ten yards was set up along a path leading to a ladder climb and cargo net crossing.

The trail now led us on an extended looped back around towards the festival area where the obstacle difficulty increased starting with an 8-foot wall climb immediately followed up by a tractor tire drag down and pull back.

Making our way now to the festival grounds Terrain set up the first of their two rigs. This rig proved to be the easier of the two as the first half included 3 suspended ball holds leading to a high handle followed by 4 low rings which required an athlete to use their feet to make the final transitions where a bell tap signaled fulfillment of the task.

Rigs

A short distance away the second rig was set up. This proved to be the more difficult of the two as the configuration was a repeat of ropes to single high rings. The Tarzan Swing was an appropriate name for this rig and this obstacle caused the greatest bottleneck.

The volunteer situated to explain the finish guideline was less than stellar which left some very confused as to what the finish qualifications were. Once the last rig was completed the last grip intensive obstacle was waiting in the form of a unique set of monkey bars. Situated over a pool of water this traverse led racers on a slight incline to the apex where a set of wooden beams needed to be negotiated past before the trip down the bars which was on a slight decline. These bars were tougher than they looked because some of the metal rods spun while others did not which kept athletes guessing the whole way through. The last obstacle before the finish was a combination of a balance beam leading athletes up to a cargo net crossing finally finishing with a slide down a pole where the finish line was located.

These bars were tougher than they looked because some of the metal rods spun while others did not which kept athletes guessing the whole way through. The last obstacle before the finish was a combination of a balance beam leading athletes up to a cargo net crossing finally finishing with a slide down a pole where the finish line was located.

Overall Thoughts

Despite the above-mentioned hiccups in the event, I found the Terrain Race challenging and would race it again in the future. Terrain clearly made an effort to improve the quality of their obstacles over last year and the low cost helps make this a worthwhile race.

The Chicago Speedway is a cool location to visit. Perhaps spreading out some of the obstacles would help with the racer congestion and spending a little more time instructing the volunteers on the rules couldn’t hurt.

I didn’t notice an area where you could check your finish stats and as of the Tuesday after the race, I still can’t find one online. The medals were not as big as in previous years and the finishers tee shirts were very basic but like I mentioned before, the low cost and challenging course make this a race I would run again.