F.I.T. Challenge-July 2019

Introduction

Often times when we look at races, we are too busy looking to make judgments about the race rather than appreciating all of the work and effort that goes into each event. We see names for race directors, and there are many names that can be recognized immediately like Trail Master Hammond or Mark Ballas, but more often than not, the name is just a name, or even, not noticed at all. Being a race director is a lot of work, and to be honest, like many of you reading this article, I don’t really know how much works goes into being a race director. When Robb McCoy of F.I.T. Challenge asked me to come up and see part of the action, I did not think twice before accepting the invitation.

Background Information

Robb McCoy-Race Director and Owner

Before I had the opportunity to meet Robb and the gang, I had reached out to him with questions. F.I.T. Challenge is known for winning the title of “Best Small Race Series” by MudRun Guide, but unlike many other races, F.I.T. Challenge does not plan to travel in the near future.

When I originally started talking to Robb, I asked him if he would ever consider expanding his series to some of the southern states. His answer was clear-not anytime soon, because when balancing being a father, and a full-time teacher, it would simply be too much to have the race travel.

As a teacher myself, I immediately became intrigued by the process of this race. I honestly couldn’t imagine balancing creating this race as well as managing a classroom and a family. Not only hosting a race but one that continues to win awards and have its own following that is more passionate than the following of larger series.

Robb informed me that he started his athletic career with football many years ago after his dad had bought season tickets to watch the Patriots, whose stadium was very close to where he grew up. After watching many games, he had been inspired to take on the sport himself, and that’s when a life-long passion ignited. He played through high school and in college, and he continues to pursue that passion through coaching varsity football at the school he teaches at. While he was teaching, he got his first-hand look at OCRs with Spartan and Tough Mudder and decided that he would attempt to create his own race in the area.

Additionally to teaching, coaching, and parenting, Robb works many other jobs as well. McCoy F.I.T. is the name of his company, which is the technical owner of F.I.T. Challenge, and they serve as business consultants to other brands that are popularly known in the OCR Community. Have you ever heard of Wreck Bag or Fierce Gear? Both of those companies are partners with McCoy F.I.T and have worked closely with him to gain success.

Robb claims to have never only worked exclusively as a teacher. He has also coached kickboxing at gyms, taught Wreck Bag exclusive classes at gyms, and been the general manager of an Olympic Weightlifting Gym. So, after teaching a full day each day, he would go over to the gym and work in a management position. He credits much of his success as a small business owner to the experience of managing this gym, as he claims that his boss gave him as much control as he wanted, and he was able to get a feel for which systems work for him, and which ones are flops.

Now when he is not teaching, coaching, or fathering his two children, he is seen around the community doing regular, everyday things. Mostly he is working to benefit others and his community, and of course, I doubt he will ever be able to live down modeling Wreck Bags for the local YMCA.

Aaron Farb-The Everything Guy

Farb, who is almost exclusively referred to by his last name, is known for having many different titles around the F.I.T. Community. When I asked him what his official title was, he laughed. The other members of the crew made other references, such as “The Everything Guy,” and “The One Who Does Everything.” Robb refers to Farb as his right-hand man. Regardless of what his title is or isn’t, Farb plays an extremely important role in F.I.T.

Farb completed the first F.I.T. Challenge back in 2013, and once it was over, he offered to volunteer. After that Farb attended just about every F.I.T Challenge and has offered to volunteer extensively for each one. Eventually, he just became a hard-working part of the team. Now his roles vary, but he is extremely hands-on with the experience. He is part of the building team, will mark the course, check on obstacles, and run whatever other errands he needs to in order to get things done.

When he is not working on things for F.I.T, he is a pharmacist. Additionally, he is in school for nursing, and engaged and busy with wedding planning.

Larry and Ginger Cooper-Full Potential Obstacles

Larry and Ginger Cooper own their own brand, called Full Potential Obstacles. If you’ve raced in the northern part of the country, you have probably seen them traveling at races like City Challenge, Indian Mud Run, and they have previously made appearances at OCRWC. They are most known for their obstacles like the “Destroyer,” a staple for F.I.T Challenge since 2015. Larry and Ginger are from New Jersey and drive with their truck and supplies to come build for races. In this instance, Larry and Ginger drove 6 hours to come build for F.I.T., and they came immediately to the race location to build for several more hours.

Larry does not consider his business a job, but a hobby that he does for enjoyment. When he is not traveling for races, he works in Commercial HVAC. He told me that he loves the job because ever since he has been a kid, he has found much pleasure in taking things apart and fixing them to be better. Larry says he was once offered an office job in his position but turned in down because he did not like the idea of being inside.

Ginger also keeps busy with work when she is not pairing with Larry on building obstacles. She works as a dental hygienist and a personal trainer. She loves both of her jobs, stating that she has some of the best bosses she could ask for. Ginger is almost always smiling, and when she comes to F.I.T. Challenge, she takes on many different roles such as registration, check-in, and selling merchandise, just to name a few.

Out of curiosity, I asked the couple how they got into OCR. Ginger used to play soccer in school, and then afterward began training for half marathons and full ones as well. She fell in love with running. When she met Larry, he absolutely hated running. Because of his love of rock climbing, being hands-on, and being outside, the two agreed that OCR would be a hobby to collaborate their passions, and they have not looked back since.

Jen Lee-Everything Else

In addition to asking Farb what his title was, I asked Jen as well. She also laughed when I asked her, and said: “I pretty much do whatever needs to be done.” Jen has been with F.I.T. for many races now, but mostly takes on roles such as registration, selling merchandise, among others. Also, Jen is part of the build team, and very proud of the fact that F.I.T. presents a female build team along with Full Potential Obstacles. Jen is often the one who puts her foot down in the group to people who are trying to take advantage of Robb’s generosity.

In addition to working with the F.I.T. franchise, Jen is a personal trainer and a single mom of three daughters. Each morning before school, after she drops her oldest daughter off at the high school, she takes her younger daughters to run at a local park. Now, her daughters have built a love for running, and even her 11-year-old daughter has completed 8 laps at the F.I.T. Ultra for the last two years. When she’s not working as a mom, she is caught working twelve-hour workdays every day as a personal trainer/physical therapist at a nearby facility.

Scott-Volunteer Coordinator

I did not have the opportunity to meet Scott during the span of this race. I don’t know much about him other than he is the manager of volunteers, he helps in the building process, and is a member of the team at Bonefrog.

Challenge Preparations

Although I had the opportunity to work with the F.I.T. crew for many days, I had not seen all that went into building this course. I arrived on Wednesday, which was 3 days before the race was to be held.

3 days before the race (Wednesday)

Upon my arrival, after meeting with Mr. McCoy at the airport, we went straight to meet with Robb’s supplier for medals, obstacle mats, shirts, and other gear. His name is Mark, pronounced “Maaaahk” with GO EAST. Mark seemed to have a very “open door” policy with his clients, especially Robb. The two have been a pair since 2014, working on many races together. Maahk walked us around his office, which contained a warehouse with everything that he makes in it as well. Many people don’t know that the F.I.T Challenge uses the same supplier as Spartan Race. Not only that, but this pair works really well together. Robb will just walk in, pitch an idea, and they go from there. There is a laid-back relationship there that is still very professional, but because it is friendly, things end up getting done more quickly.

In this instance, Maahk walked us around his facility and showed us several of the products used to design what is used in F.I.T. and other races. Because Maahk and Robb have such a close relationship, Maahk is willing to work with Robb on providing additional gear that may be unused from other events. Rather than throw it out, it is recycled and used at F.I.T. For instance, the tape that is used to mark the course is a printed green that Spartan Race decided not to use.

FIT Challenge

Another supplier that works with F.I.T. Challenge is Wreck Bag. As previously mentioned, Robb had been a business advisor to them in the past. We originally went in to grab a truckload of wreck bags to use for Saturday’s race, but we stopped in to talk with the owners as well. They laughed and joked very casually, and told me stories of how they have been working with Robb for a long time, which led to both bad and good, but all very funny, stories of their past. The team mentioned that they are very thankful for Robb and how he has helped jump-start their business, and they are proud supporters of F.I.T. They mentioned that they are working on a new product, which may be released later this year, and if it is, the next F.I.T. Challenges may be one of the first, if not the first, OCR to get their hands on this new product. They wanted to speak with Robb and show Robb designs of their new product, and while they did so, I had to step out of the room (sorry guys!).

After loading an F150 truck bed entirely of wreck bags, weighing 25 lbs each, we were off to the racecourse. We emptied the pile of wreck bags onto the course, where they would be used that weekend. Then, it was time for the first adventure of marking the course.

We loaded up backpacks with arrow signs, and a few rolls of green tape to tag the trees with. Then, it was time to trudge on. We got into the field at Diamond Hill Park, and then we trudged up the hill. “Oh, so the first climb is right away?” I asked.

“Yep!” He said, excitedly.

We made our way over and up the hill, and as soon as we made it to the hill, it started storming. We pressed on anyway because regardless of Wednesday’s weather, the race would still be on for Saturday.

He assured me not to be shy about using packing tape because he does not like to worry about people getting lost on the course. He assured me no matter how much you mark a course, we could pretty much count that someone would manage to get lost. By the time we had gotten there, only a few obstacles of the course had been up. They had set up the Gibbons Experience much earlier in the week with the intention to allow people to attempt (see photo below). The first obstacle of the day was going to be the low crawl, which had already been set up with a bungee-type cord strung around trees going down a hill.

Gibbons at FIT

When we made our way down the hill, we talked about the layout of the course. The first climb had been pretty rough, the descend down the backside equally as difficult, and he informed me that there would be at least two more big climbs in the 3-mile course. He said he enjoyed having the layout set up that way because it makes the run more interesting.

Roughly an hour later, and 2/3 of the course had been marked. It was time to call it a day.

We went back to Robb’s house and attempted to eat dinner. It was difficult to hold a conversation with Robb, not because of his mannerisms, but his phone was buzzing constantly with e-mails and social media messages related to Saturday’s challenge. Most of the messages made the same comments: “Are you sure you want to have the race go on even though it’s going to be hot?” and “I can’t make the race now because it’s going to be hot, can I defer my race entry to April?”

F.I.T. has a transfer policy of transferring your race entry to another as long as it is at least ten days out, so to cancel 3 days out did not go over well. Many people asked if the day was going to be transferred to a different date–sadly, what can be difficult to recognize is that having a race costs money, the venue costs, to build obstacle costs, so it is not so easily pushed to another date. So although many of us look at upcoming races and think that it’s easy to transfer, we have to remember that it is not always so easy, and they may not be able to book the same venue.

In addition to receiving numerous calls from race day participants regarding their registration, Robb was also busy answering calls from companies for the race. He had received calls from the city government asking him to renew his entertainment license, which he completed earlier in the month. He had worked out arrangements with companies to deliver ice, as well as an ice bathtub for the athletes. He had arranged for Emergency Medical Treatment certified staff would be on-site to assist in injured athletes. These were just a few of the accommodations that were provided for his athletes. He had spent days prior working endlessly to build relationships from these companies, and have more than enough ice and water supply to last even the 12-hour runners. They also provided lots of baby pools, completely filled with ice, on multiple areas of the course and festival throughout.

Water at FIT

Earlier in the day, he had posted a message on Facebook informing participants of all of the measures that F.I.T. was taking to arrange for help regarding heat earlier in the day. Many of the people who responded to that message were very thankful that those accommodations had been made.

2 days before the race (Thursday)

We began our day by visiting Rev’d, a local spin class that Robb visits prior to work in the day, and it served as another reminder of how at the end of the day, Robb is just another normal person. The gym is located near the Patriots Stadium, where he reminisced on old football-related memories.

By 6:30, it was already back to work. His kids were dropped off, and even though the kids were there, he still had to review the names and bib numbers and get ready to send out the race day informational e-mail. Then, it was back to the race day location to build more obstacles.

FIT McCoy

When we arrived, Larry, Ginger, Jen, Farb, and a few volunteers were there to help build the obstacles. Larry and Ginger keep the same building equipment for the Destroyers and Devil’s Playground each time, so all there was was to be patient and listen to Larry’s instructions. Others went off to build some of the obstacles that are not completed by Full Potential, such as the floating walls. Once all of the obstacles were just about complete, it was time to go back out and complete the final portions of the course marking.

Destroyer Build 1Destroyer Build 2

One thing that I appreciate about Robb is that whenever a group of people gets together to work with him, he is very accommodating. He let everyone who stayed to work on the course stay with him, and he feeds his volunteers who work on build days. Additionally, volunteers who work on build days are provided with race-day vouchers to compete.

By the end of this day, the course had been pretty much set up with the exception of last-minute course markings. On this day, many more people were sending e-mails and messages regarding having their race entry deferred. I asked Robb if he was unsure whether or not people would drop from Saturday, and he said that he felt confident that the usual no-show rate would remain the same.

On the way home, Robb pointed out his first venue to me. The first F.I.T. Challenge took place on a smaller, flat field. Participants circled and winded through a flat field, ran through trees, and in the back, many of the original obstacles were provided by a local CrossFit gym. The original F.I.T. Challenge had roughly 1,300 participants, due to advertising on Groupon.

One day before the race (Friday)

By the time I had arrived on Friday, the festival area had been mostly set up. Robb and Jen both brought their children to help fold the finisher t-shirts and help out where they can.

FIT Festival

All that was left to do was organize merchandise, hang up signs and flags, and get ready for race day registration. Calls were still coming in regarding trading out registrations, and the answer was still no. Some fitness groups came to sign their teams up, and a few more came to register and collect their gear. Every single runner received a mug, a head buff, a tech shirt, and each runner was supposed to receive a collapsible cup that was going to take the place of having cups at water stations. The problem was, although the cups had been ordered three months in advance, they had not been shipped on time. Robb received an email at roughly 2:30 in the afternoon saying that they were finally shipped in, but they could not be sent out for delivery, and someone needed to go pick them up. We were able to go get them and they were ready on time, but it was a close call!

At registration, a few people showed up to get their gear ready for the next day. Most of the runners who came were ultra runners, who were starting early in the morning. If ultra runners completed the ultra in both April and in this race, they received a plaque for being an “ultra-ultra” runner.

Ultra Ultra FIT

Another unique piece of F.I.T. that i have not previously mentioned is that anyone is able to run. There are no kids races at F.I.T. In hte past they offered kids races, but there were not enough participants to justify continuing to offer the,. Instead, there is not an age requirement to run. That’s right–that means if you’re a parent of a kid who wants to run adult courses, F.I.T. is a good option for you.

The day of F.I.T. Challenge

On the day of the race, Robb was difficult to locate because he had been trying to meet as many of his participants as he could. He found me, I asked him if he was nervous, and he said “Nope. If you do things right, there’s nothing to worry about on race day. It’s just a waiting game.”

One thing that is interesting about Robb as opposed to things I’ve seen in other races. I have seen many people hang out with race directors after races, drink, and be friendly, but not quite like the way that people try to be friendly with Robb. Robb is very nice, and unfortunately, many of his participants try to squeeze out opportunities to take advantage of him, without recognizing the difference between that and being taken care of. The first example is from the people who stayed at his house and dipped as soon as they completed their lap. It’s not fair to him, and I don’t think that is going to stop until he puts down and tells people no.

The second case of people trying to take advantage of Robb was, and Jen, who worked parking in the morning, knew ahead of time that people would do this, was with parking. Parking at the venue was $10. However, people would pull up to Jen, and say “I know Robb,” expecting to get out of paying. Jen’s response back was hysterical and simple: “I know Robb, too. That will be $10!” It is frustrating that people at this race feel like simply saying that is going to provide them with a discount, or something for free. Additionally, it is good that Jen was working parking, because someone from another OCR media organization came without alerting F.I.T. ahead of time, with a homemade name badge declaring he needed to be allowed in for free due to his position. He paid the $10.

The main F.I.T. crew had gone to their stations. The startline announcer “Blaze,” was ready to go. Jen and their friend Adam were at parking, Robb was circulating, Larry was at his obstacle “The Devil’s Playground,” , Ginger was working merchandise, and Farb was circulating, checking for safety and to help the runners. The volunteer coordinators were nowhere to be seen. Somehow, the volunteers made it to their stations. I actually think it was Farb who told them where to go.

The beginning of the race meant Robb was explaining rules to the ultra runners himself. At one point there were some technical difficulties with the playing of the Star-Spangled Banner, and Robb immediately came up with the solution of a moment of silence, but the team was able to get the problem fixed right away. When the elite runners were up in the minutes following, Robb made the announcements for them, and then went immediately to the Gibbons obstacle.

The Course

FIT Start

The start line was placed on the bottom of a discrete hill, that led right away into a sharp curve on a flatter surface. Some volunteers were sitting at a picnic table,  giving words of encouragement before the first climb was coming. After you made your second turn, roughly 300 meters into the race (by my calculation, which is not an exact measurement in the slightest), it was alright time to ascend the first climb of the day.

The first ascend, although rocky, isn’t a terribly long one. As long as you can keep your feet moving, you’ll be up in no time. At the top of the hill, the course veers to the left, to reach a rockier peak. While Robb and I marked the course several days prior, he showed me part of the mountain that was not on the course. Although the course veers left, to the right, there is quite a view. F.I.T Challenge is held at Diamond Hill Park, and the first climb is, well, Diamond Hill. The top of the hill contains a marvelous view. This section of the park had previously been a part of the course, but after receiving some feedback on the descent, that portion had been removed.

After you continue going up the hill and through some rocky areas, you eventually hit a downhill. The downhill is also home to the first obstacle: the low crawl.

Low crawls can be interesting because there are a lot of different ways that crawls can be established in a course. The F.I.T. Challenge team chose to take a bungee-like material and wrap it around the surrounding trees. Although the bungee material was strapped on fairly low to the ground, the give of the cord made the obstacle doable for athletes of all sizes.

FIT Low Crawl

Following the downhill was a nice, flat run. Initially, the terrain was slightly rocky, with a two to three-person width. Then there was a simple cargo net climb that was fairly sturdy. Greeting runners afterward was an overgrown single person track. The ground here split in certain areas, adding some tricky footing on a trail that otherwise would have been relatively simple. Coming up soon were the first looks at the major obstacles.

Once you came out of the woods, there was an inverted ladder-type wall. There was a volunteer when I ran through, and I imagine she was there the majority of the run as well. Following that was the opportunity to run through a circle of trees, right into the rope climb. It was a short rope with several knots in it, making it a less than difficult rope. Underneath the rope was squishy, F.I.T. branded safety pads. Once you turned around, it was right to the pegboards. The pegboards slightly varied in height, and athletes were allowed to choose whichever one fit their comfort accordingly. Robb informed me a few days prior that athletes are allowed to wrap their legs around the tree for support.

FIT Pegs

A few more steps in the woods led athletes to the monkey cargo net. I had never seen one of these before coming to F.I.T. Many athletes began their attempt through this obstacle using an inverted-crawl-type method, while others attempted to monkey through. However, to monkey through was slow and taxing on grip, so many who began using that method did not follow through for the duration of the obstacle. Next up was the Gibbons Rig.

FIT Monkey Cargo

 

FIT Monkey Cargo 2

The Gibbons Rig contained a few different elements. The first one obviously, the Gibbons’ brackets. On the far right lanes, there were 6 brackets, separated by 3 feet each. The middle lanes contained 9 gibbons brackets, each 2 feet apart. The final lane on the left was just monkey bars. Following the gibbons (or monkey bars, depending on what you chose), there was another monkey bar, and then a cargo net to go up and over.

FIT Gibbons

Originally, when the rules were set, the elites were required to complete the side on the far right. Then, the rules changed so that the elite women could choose which lane they wanted to complete. And then the rules changed again, saying that both male and females could choose whichever Gibbons lane they wanted to complete. Robb was mandating the obstacle and made those calls based on feedback he received from athletes. The issue with this was that the volunteer coordinators failed to relay the message to their volunteers as well, so when the volunteers who were present were asked what to do, the information was not consistent.

Following the Gibbons Rig was an extremely dry slip wall. I wore my VJ shoes and was able to run all the way up easily. The slip wall originally had crooked steps on the back, but the day before the race, it drove the build team so crazy that they re-did it. (F.I.T. crew please forgive me for using this picture…I did not take another one after it was adjusted! ) Immediately after that was a tunnel crawl.

FIT Slip

Twisted tape made you think that the Destroyer  2.0 was coming up next, but it was actually a series of over/under/through walls. Following was another shorter ascend into the woods.

Running through some rocky terrain led athletes into their next obstacle: the first ladder wall. It was built very sturdily into the trees and did not seem to cause athletes many issues. Follow the downhill and you will reach the second ladder wall as well as a two-sided vertical cargo net. A series of volunteers waited at this area to greet athletes. Following that and you met face to face with a relatively tall Irish table.

After working through several more areas where you could actually run, you finally winded your way back to the Destroyer 2.0. Many of the elite runners had a difficult time, not with the “destroyer” portion of the obstacle, but the tires at the end. The tires were still a little slick from the morning dew. Following the destroyer was a run up a hill, with wreck bags at the bottom. Both men and women were expected to carry the 25 lb bag. People could grab a second bag if they didn’t feel like 25 lbs was heavy enough.

The interesting piece of the wreck bag carry was that, not only did you have to carry it up a hill (because let’s face it, usually when we see wreck bags, we can expect to see hills), but you had to carry it over F.I.T.’s teeter-totter obstacle as well. Elite athletes had to carry it with them over the obstacle. Open wavers, Ultras, and Multi-lappers did not. Then, it was up the hill, down the hill, a turn to the right, and already time to put the bag back in the pile.

Then, it was time to go over two tire hurdles (also seen in other races as Rolling Thunder) and on to the floating walls. The floating walls that were in the woods here were the shorter walls, with the back facing toward the runners. People could climb the ladder on the back of the wall to scale the obstacle. But, when athletes made it to the top and were turning their way down the other side, the wall turned horizontally with them. Very scary, but a unique and exciting take on a standard wall.

FIT Rolling Thunder

Then it was time for more running in the woods. This new trail looped you to the backside of where the herd of volunteers was located earlier, and runners were greeted with another tilting floating wall. This time, the wall was taller (I’m short and my perception of height isn’t always perfect,) and if I had to guess, I would assume it was 7 feet. Unlike the other floating wall, this one had the wall side facing you, so unless you were confident in your jump, it was more difficult to get to the other side.

More running later, and there was a cargo net climb. The net on this cargo shifted with movement, so competitors going through this obstacle had to slow it down to ensure safety. Luckily, the camaraderie of this race is outstanding, and many of the contestants were willing to hold it still for the next person.

Many more rocks later, and you came across the “OS” hill. Unlike the other climbs of the day, this hill was going down. The dirt on this hill, with the mixture of its trees and rocks descending down, will make you realize why people call it the “OS hill” really quickly! There was a sharp turn at the bottom and a little bit more running until the trail opened up and you could see the last two obstacles.

Next up: the Devil’s Playground. Man, this is one that I had been thrilled to try for ages. Although it looks like a shorter version of the Stairway to Heaven from Conquer the Gauntlet, this Full Potential Obstacles creation certainly is not. What makes this obstacle difficult is one, you have to start from almost sitting, and also, in between using the planks to grab, you have to alternate your hands onto the bar that is holding the plank as well. It is an extremely difficult obstacle, but one that will certainly keep your training on your toes…and completely humble you if you haven’t.

FIT Devil

The Devil’s Playground was the appetizer for Full Potential’s first award-winning obstacle, the Destroyer, and then it was on to the finish.

FIT Destroyer

Breakdown/Other Race Day Shenanigans

Afterward, I noticed how everyone on the crew was kind of scattered. I didn’t see many of anyone else until it was time to come to other obstacles. The only person I had seen during that time was Larry posted at Devil’s Playground, eagerly waiting to tell people that they could not use their feet while climbing up. Once the top finishers came, Robb and Farb were waiting at the finish line to distribute medals.

At the end of the day, there were several different media sources who were there looking to get attention. Unfortunately, some of the people who were there were looking to cause some trouble. At one point I saw Robb being interviewed by someone and the interviewer said while recording Robb’s response, “a lot of people didn’t like the layout of the course, because they said the trees made it feel like heat was being trapped, what do you have to say to that?” Let me tell you, I was on that course. I was on site all day, and I spoke with many participants and volunteers. Not a single person actually said that. It was just an instance of someone trying to cause problems.

The breakdown began that afternoon, and ultra lapping competitors were told that they were then having to do obstacle-free laps at 2:30. But, there was another problem. Originally, the ultras were told they were not going to have to start obstacle-free laps until 3:00. During the race, some people went around told athletes obstacle-free laps started at 2:00. Someone else said that the obstacle-free laps started at 2:30. Regardless of who said what, nobody said anything to the volunteers about what time the obstacle-free laps started. So, when runners came through and started asking whether or not they needed to complete obstacles, they weren’t sure.

I notified Robb right away, and he let the substitute volunteer coordinator know so the message could be passed on. But then, another problem came. Some of the volunteers were told to take down some of the course markings. They started taking down ALL of the course markings…even though there were runners still on course. Luckily, at this point, the runners who were on course had been on course for 8 hours and were relatively familiar with where they needed to go. Some were not. A few runners claimed to have gone off course. Some used that in order to cut the course significantly.

The breakdown of many of the other obstacles was fantastic. A group of recruits from a local army base came and were incredibly willing to help. Many of the volunteers who had signed up to help with breakdown left early on in the day, and never came to work their volunteer shift. After Jen’s suggestions, the volunteers who did not show up for their volunteer shift were sent a bill for their race.

The breakdown of obstacles with Larry was excellent. If I could recommend to a race company to use Full Potential Obstacles, I would not just on the fact that his obstacles are great, but the breakdown of those obstacles is quick and painless as well. He and Ginger have a system that is unbeatable.

Lessons Learned

From working with Robb for the last several days, I learned a lot about putting on a race.

One, I learned how important it is to have built connections in your area. Robb had made connections with local printing companies, the parks, and rec department, and gyms in the area, just to name a few. I don’t think that Robb would have the success that did if he had not built connections. The connections he built are important also because they are a reflection of the job that he has put in. I know that those connections would not be as strong if he was not a strong leader.

Two, I learned it is important to have a strong team. I know that F.I.T. is often identified as Robb’s creation, and although it is primarily Robb’s, Farb, Jen, and the Coopers are phenomenal at filling in the pieces and putting it all together. Not only that, but there are people there who celebrate the victories with you, and can help bring you back up when you feel like things aren’t going the way you imagined they would. Also, I know that the un-successes could have been prevented with a stronger volunteer coordinator, and I am looking forward to more F.I.T. adventures where the entire team will be together.

Three, I learned just how important it is to build a community involving your event. 100s of people were asked during this event what their favorite part about the race is, and the first thing that all of them said was that it was because the community was so kind and loving. You are not going to have the same feel at large races. Even though the course is exceedingly challenging, people find a way to bond over this event time after time… to the point where they feel as though they all have very personal relationships with Robb.

I learned how important it is to have good volunteers. Because a community like this is so in love with the event, there were several good volunteers who were excited to be a part of the event. Seeing how helpful the Army Recruits were was really encouraging. Additionally, because they were so thrilled to bring such a large group and get to be helpful. The participants in that event are going to have really strong leadership skills from continuing to come and give up their time to be a part of a community event so willingly.

Lastly, I confirmed my belief that directing a race, while working full-time is really challenging. All of the people who put on F.I.T. are those who give up so much of their time so that they can build something that unites a group of people while giving them an experience they’ll never forget. The fact that these people can do so much and still be able to unite a group the way that they do is pretty damn inspiring.

So, if you have heard about F.I.T. Challenge and you’re not sure if it lives up to the hype, take my word for it, it does. It pairs unique obstacles with interesting terrain, and to add a cherry on top, a supportive community. It is definitely one to mark off on your bucket list!

FIT Podium

Top finishers of single-lap elite wave:

Men:

1st-Jarrett Newby

2nd-Jeremy Goncalves

3rd- Javier Gutierrez

Women:

1st-Cassandra Ohman

2nd-Jennifer Dowd

3rd-Kristen Cincotti

 

2019 Race Season Preview: Savage Race

It’s 2019 and that means it’s time to start planning another year of racing. What better way to decide which company gets your hard earned dollar, then by taking a look at what all of the major players will be offering participants in the coming year.

This is the second preview in a 4-week series looking at the 2019 obstacle course racing season.

Savage Race

When you talk about OCR brands, there’s always a conversation about “The Big 4”. And those four are Spartan, Tough Mudder, SAVAGE RACE, and well… the fourth spot is interchangeable. But if there is one race that is primed to challenge for best OCR experience in 2019, it’s Savage Race. Why? Well let’s look at the east coast based powerhouse that is Savage Race

Obstacles

Piece of Queso. Colossus. Shriveled Richard. Chopsticks… and so much more. The obstacle names are just as creative as the obstacles themselves at Savage Race. Want innovation? Want creativity? Savage Race is swimming in it, being awarded “Most Innovative” and “Best New Obstacle” in 2018. Savage isn’t afraid to bring monstrous obstacle builds with them wherever they go. Staples like Twirly Bird, Wheel World, and Davy Jones Locker ensure that Savage tests your body and mind with every race course you step foot on.

Savage was also one of the first companies to put the obstacles at the forefront of their customer experience. Want to see what you’re in for? They’re all on the website to check out. You can see them all listed here. They’ll even list the completion rate for them!

Look for more new obstacles coming in 2019 as well. Savage is constantly upping the bar with obstacles year after year.

Savage Blitz

In 2018 Savage Race announced the addition of Savage Blitz. An obstacle-packed 3-mile version of the Savage experience. The rollout and availability of the Savage Blitz in 2018 were, as all things Savage, slow and methodical. Or in OCR industry terms… smart.

For 2019, the Savage Blitz course has been added to EVERY event weekend now. Savage Blitz is a fast, heart pumping, quad burning all-out sprint through Savage’s signature obstacles with its own custom finisher shirt and medals. And the Blitz counts towards your Savage Syndicate achievement – more on that shortly.

Savage Pro & Blitz Pro

I’m not entirely sure why Savage Race doesn’t get more credit for it’s Savage Pro wave because they are dishing out cash faster than Bob Barker in a Showcase Showdown. Every Savage Race event and every Savage Blitz now offers incredible Podium Awards:

1st Place: $1,000; Gold Medal; The Savage Axe (Yes, an actual mounted Axe)

2nd Place: $500; Silver Medal

3rd Place: $250; Bronze Medal

Age Group awards are offered as well, which don’t carry a cash prize, but do offer Gold, Silver or Bronze medals to the winners.

Savage Pro is mandatory obstacle completion. Which means you’ll get to re-try any obstacles you fail, but you can not continue in the Pro Wave until you complete them. Can’t do it? Give up your band, and you’re done for the day. But for Savage Race veteran Yuri Force, the Pro Wave has been a great way to stuff some money in his pocket. And with 13+ events in 2019, the total purse across all Savage’s events tops $45,000.

Medals & Finisher Tees

It’s worth mentioning again that Savage Race has already taken home a handful of awards – those awards are Best New Obstacle; Runner Up – Best OCR Race Director, Bo Burton; Best North American Race Series; Most Innovative Race Series; and Best Mid-Size Race Series. Why they also didn’t win Best Medal is beyond me. Look at these things:

As if the Savage Race and Savage Blitz races in matte black and blue/green weren’t good enough, you’ll also get a sweet mirrored finish Savage Syndicate medal once you’ve completed any two events on the year. You’ve got Savage Axes, coins for additional races, and a ton more glorious looking bling to take home from your Savage experience..

Summary

Savage Race is doing OCR right. Their methodical approach to growth, use of community feedback, and incredible obstacle design have helped Savage position itself as a strong competitor in this industry. We didn’t even mention their partnership with GORUCK at certain events! I can only say good things about Savage Race, the event, the obstacles, and the community.

I’ll be at the Maryland event in early May this year, so if you’re in the area and you want to watch me shake with fear and cry atop Davy Jones’ Locker, you know where to find me.

Now I know what you’re thinking West Coasters: “Why hasn’t Savage Race come out west?!” Well… because the founder, Sam Abbitt, knows what he’s doing. He’s not going all BattleFrog on us. Trust us when we say, a trip to a Savage event is well worth your time and hard-earned dollars.

Take it from Sam. I mean just look at this guy.

2019 Race Season Preview: Spartan Race

It’s 2019 and that means it’s time to start planning another year of racing. What better way to decide which company gets your hard earned dollar, then by taking a look at what all of the major players will be offering participants in the coming year.

This is the first preview in a 4-week series looking at the 2019 obstacle course racing season.

Spartan Race

With over 200 events in 40 different countries, Spartan Race has solidified themselves as the top dog in Obstacle Course Racing. So how does Spartan keep it “fresh” in the new year? Let’s take a look.

Obstacles

OCR is nothing without the obstacles. And in 2019, Spartan has finally admitted that it’s time for some innovation in this space. Joe De Sena once took the stance that he didn’t want to be the company trying to release 2 or 3 new obstacles every year “like those Orange guys” but it becomes quickly clear that after 2 years without something “new”, the time is right.

Spartan announce in October of last year that they are bringing SIX (6) “new or updated obstacles” to their events in 2019. We’ve seen at least one of those obstacles – The Helix (video below) – confirmed by Spartan. The other’s have been rumored. Mike Morris, Spartan’s VP of Production referred to one as “The Egg Beater”, which may be this – seen in Spartan Malaysia in early 2018.

Other possible additions to the 2019 obstacle lineup could be the Irish Table that we saw at the Spartanburg, SC and Central Florida Beasts. The Great Wall, a variant on the current Stairway to Sparta could also be in the mix this year.

David Watson, VP of Product for Spartan Race, also made mention of different “modes” for obstacles in 2019. Modes are, as he explained, a different setup for obstacles depending on the course and distance you’re competing in. The Spartan Rig in a Sprint may be made up of all rings, whereas the Beast Mode (see what they did there?) will include Rings, Ropes, and Bars. These modes could impact obstacles such as the Monkey BarsHercules Hoist, and even Olympus.

Finish all of those “new and updated” obstacles? You’ve got one final challenge before you jump the fire. Spartan is bringing back the Gladiators to select events in 2019. So while training this off season, be sure to practice your fancy footwork, if you don’t want to fall victim to a mud-covered pupil stick.

Spartan Trail

Not a fan of the new obstacles? Spartan has got you covered. After a couple test runs in Virginia and Los Angeles, Spartan is rolling our a 12 event Trail Series in 2019. The Trail Series has been met with tenuous responses from would-be consumers but Spartan has already ensured a captive audience by announcing that Spartan Trail races would be included in the Spartan Season Pass.

Spartan Trail will offer a 10km and 21km option, depending on the venue, with prices ranging from $65 to $95 and include a finisher shirt and new teal Spartan medal.

Stadion Rebranding

Thousands of competitors have gotten their start at Spartan Race at a Stadium event. The short-form Sprint style event hosted at iconic locations such as Dallas’ AT&T Stadium, and Boston’s Fenway Park, is getting an upgrade in 2019.

Spartan proclaimed that the Stadium event was no more, and thus, Stadion was born. What is a Spartan Station event you ask, and how is it different? Well beyond the claims of “going back to its roots” and offering competitors “new challenges and ancient traditions”, we only know that Stadion events have claimed the color yellow for its medal and finisher shirt, but little else is known.

In 2019, “It’s ON like StadiON” (copywrite Josh Chace – all rights reserved)

Elite & Age Group Competitive Series

One Series to Rule Them All

Planning on visiting all the Stadion events in 2019? There’s a series for that. Mountains your thing? There’s a series for that. In 2019, there’s a series for any type of Spartan Racer out there. The one Series probably most anticipated, and most polarizing, is the Championship Series – leading up to the World Championship on September 29 in Lake Tahoe, CA (for a 5th straight year).

The World Championship is the culmination of a National Series season consisting of 5 (US) races ranging from February in Jacksonville, FL to July’s Utah finale. The Regional National Championship is next (in West Virginia for the US) which all helps filter the sports best athletes in to Lake Tahoe for a first-time Sunday World Championship event, where the eyes of the world will watch Jon Albon claim another Spartan top spot, before moving on to win the $1,000,000 purse. Yes, that’s a bold prediction. It would be great, wouldn’t it?

2019 Spartan Championships

Age Group Revisions

New for 2019’s Age Group competition, is the announcement that the 30-39 and 40-49 will be broken up into 5-year increments. Long overdue, the 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, and 45-49 waves look to be some of the most competitive of the year.

Need full details on how to qualify? Matt B. Davis interviewed David Watson and broke down the full qualification paths here.

Medals & Finisher Tees

Let’s be honest. Few things drive obstacle course race enthusiasts to sign up for an event, quite like a well-designed finisher medal.

I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves:

The 2019 medals are updated all around. And while opinions have varied, Spartan gets high marks for a wholesale update to the medal lineup, including this amazing variant available to Winter Spartan Race finishers

And lastly, to go along with your fancy new Spartan Race Medals, there’s new Craft design, finisher T-shirts, complete with … branding! You’ll now be a walking, talking, Spartan, Craft, Rakuten Billboard.

Summary

If you’re a fan of Spartan Race, there’s a whole lot to be excited about in 2019. From new obstacles to updated medals and tees to an all-inclusive competitive series, leading up to Championship caliber events to finish off the year. Spartan looks to be the most well-rounded branding once again, heading into their 9th year in the industry.

Interested? Sign Up Here

Savage Race Florida Has Serious Beef With Their Racers!

Savage-Race-Mens-Pro-Start

Thanks to the Florida Women’s Cattle Association, Savage Race served up protein packed, amazing post race bites of some of the most well seasoned, succulent rib eye and NY strip steaks. That sure beats the traditional bananas and protein bars for this racer!

I’m getting ahead of myself however, so let me run down the basics before getting to the true meat of Savage Race, the obstacles. The heart-pounding, well-designed, and amazingly fun obstacles that had thousands of Savages from 37 states descend upon Florida to run the very first Savage Race of 2017.

The parking situation: Savage Race Florida did not have VIP parking. It was $10 to park at the venue with a first come, first serve situation in order to get the best spot. The parking area was close enough to the venue with a short walk to the entrance, where a friendly volunteer handed you a course map.

Savage-Race-Course-Map-Volunteer

What about the Port-o-potties? There were portable crappers in the parking area and the festival area as far as the eye can see. So, if you had to do race rule #1 (Take a dump before the race), there was no wait before or after the race. They also had 2 portable crapper stations on the course right around miles 3 and 6. As for the cleanliness? You’ve seen worse. Much much worse, trust me on that. Post race is where you start asking, “Mud or poo?”

Savage-Rage-Venue-Porta-Potties

Registration and packet pickup: Simple and hassle free. Just make sure that you have a valid I.D., your bib number and a signed waiver.

Savage-Race-Registration-Volunteer-Packet-Pickup-Tent

Bag check: $5 (each bag) to check your belongings, and if you needed to get something from your bag after checking it, like a second packet for your Savage Syndicate lap, or if you simply forgot something they will not charge you again. Your belongings were kept behind long tables where very friendly but watchful volunteers and security made sure your things were safe.

Savage-Race-Bag-Check-Tent

Savage Syndicate Program: There seems to be some confusion on how this works. It’s very simple folks: run 2 paid laps in 1 calendar year and you get a big, spinning medal to go with your 2 regular medals. You can run 2 paid laps on the same day like I did and BOOM, you too can walk around like King or Queen shit though the festival area with your neck laden with bling. You also get a state pin, and the best part? All Savage Races that you run after becoming a Savage Syndicate: you get the regular medal and another Syndicate spinner medal with that state’s pin, without having to run double laps at the same venue.

Savage-Race-Syndicate_Kevin-LaPlatney

Savage Race Pro Kevin “MudMan” LaPlatney, Owner of Obstacle Athletics with his Savage Race Syndicate Bling (Gold Medal not included)

Water stations: There were 3 water stations on the course spaced every 2 miles, and Savage Race is still keeping the water on ice. So when you are handed your own personal water bottle, it’s nice and refreshingly cold. They spoil their racers, unlike another race brand (which shall not be named) that tends to run out of the water and is warm enough to make tea with.

The obstacles: Oh my, where do I even begin? Savage Race surprised many of their Florida regulars with the course set up this year. The first mile was a nice long run without any obstacles. You heard that correctly my fellow Savages, a Savage Race where they didn’t bombard you within the first ¼ mile with obstacles. How is this a good thing some may be wondering? It builds up anticipation, and you get a nice warm up mile to get the blood flowing before they start slamming you with obstacle after obstacle.

Savage-Race-Shriveled-Richard-Obstacle

Once you hit their first obstacle named Barn Doors, which is a wooden fence that you climb over the obstacles start coming at you quickly in true Savage Race fashion. Barbed wire crawls, mud pits, cargo nets, high walls, their signature obstacles like Sawtooth, Shriveled Richard, Wheel World, Colossus, Davy Jones and much more are spaced so that once you are done with one obstacle you are just a stone’s throw away from the next one.

On my first lap I did notice that the Squeeze Play obstacle which was placed over a mud pit was closed. Of course, the first thought that came to mind was, “GATOR IN THE MUD PIT!” but that thought quickly went away as I ran towards the always intimidating Sawtooth. On my second lap Squeeze play was placed over dry ground a few feet away from the mud pit which had red lettered caution tape, so it kind of confirmed to me that there was a “GATOR IN THE MUD PIT!” There is no official confirmation on that however, and it could just be all in my head.

Savage-Race-Mad-Ladders-Obstacle

Savage Race threw many racers for a loop when they placed Colossus a few obstacles before the finish line. I heard quite a few Savages wondering, “Colossus isn’t last?” Oh no my friends, they placed it right before Teeter Tuber making crawling up the rubber pipes extra challenging and fun because the insides were SAF (Slippery As F*ck).

Savage-Race-Colossus-Obstacle

Speaking of challenging, the hardest traverse wall in OCR, “Kiss My Walls” just got even more challenging. Savage Race upped it up a notch by adding fencing in between the tiny rock climbing pegs. Still no step stool for us shorties, sorry my fellow vertically challenged pals.

I’ll touch briefly on their 2 new obstacles that many were wondering about, Mad Ladders and Twirly Bird, since nobody had even seen a picture of these two before the race. Mad Ladders consists of rope ladders and loose cargo nets which you traverse across. Sounds easy? Far from it as you’ll be spun around and tangled up.

Twirly Bird? No propellers involved, but it’s the rig to end all rigs. Oh you thought trying to hang onto tennis balls was hard? Try hanging onto shredded ropes with tiny individual knots. You better have the grip strength of a silverback gorilla to get through this one.

Savage-Race-Twirly-Bird-Obstacle

All in all it was 28 great obstacles (no heavy carries allowed) packed into a 6 mile course.

Savage-Race-Runners

Festival area: After jumping over the fire and getting your precious medal and finisher shirt, Florida Savages were treated to what seems to be every OCR racer’s favorite post race beer Shock Top. For those that do not drink, your beer ticket was treated like you just handed off a $100 bill.

The food stalls worked much like a carnival where you bought tickets at a booth and various food and drink items cost x amount of tickets. $10 for a sheet of 10 tickets was how it was sold. The fare was burgers, chicken gyros, chicken on a stick, roasted corn on the cob and other carry around friendly foods.

Savage-Race-Food-Stalls

There was a nice large main tent where people were enjoying food and drinks giving it a very cool Oktoberfest vibe. There were plenty of canopied tables scattered throughout the festival area as well giving people a nice view of the stage where they held pushup contests. Hats off to the Savages that participated because this Savage could barely hold her burger up after the race.

Changing room and showers: You mean garden hoses and changing tents. The garden hoses should have a sign next to them saying, “Obstacle #29” so cold! The changing tents were secure, clean and roomy.

Savage-Race-Changing-Tents-Venue

Exit through the gift shop: Savage race has the best prices for gear and still continues to do so. Good selection of shirts, compression sleeves, headbands and if you buy 2 shirts you get a venue specific shirt for FREE!

Savage-Race-Gift-Shop-Tent

The best next race deal around: For $75 you can buy a voucher for upcoming Savage races at any venue. That price includes processing fees and the mandatory insurance, but wait there’s MORE! You also get a Savage race wristband, a “Train Savage” t-shirt and decals.

Savage-Race-Voucher-Swag

Thank you Savage race for putting on an amazing event yet again, the first race of the year was incredible and this Savage is looking forward to even more fun at Maryland Spring on April 29th.

If you’re still on the fence about trying a Savage Race, it’s time to get off of that fence, grab some friends and jump into the mud or water pit because it’s time to get SAVAGE AF!

Savage-Race-First-Timers

Photo Credit: Kevin “MudMan” LaPlatney, Poly Poli, Savage Race 

Tell us what you think of Savage Race, leave a Review Here.

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Beyond The Trifecta

trifecta-medals

The Spartan Trifecta, completion of a Sprint, Super, and Beast, in one calendar year is a proud accomplishment for many OCR athletes. However, now that it’s been around for a couple years, many athletes are looking to go beyond the trifecta. Others have found their own variant of the Trifecta called the Mountain Trifecta, which is the completion of a Trifecta on all mountain courses or an EffNorm Trifecta, which is the completion of a Trifecta on all Norm Koch courses. Recently, Spartan announced the Delta, which requires the completion of 9 different events, which is great, but what if you like other events more than Spartan, do not have the several thousand dollars to commit to a Delta, or do not live close to a lot of their events?  If you are still looking for a new type of challenge that spans beyond the reaches of an all Spartan world, here are a couple suggestions you can use to push your body to new limits through multiple events.

Pushing yourself to new limits is all about getting out of your comfort zone.  If you are always doing the same race series, you probably are not getting that far out of that comfort zone because you know all the obstacles and you know what to expect.  It is time to try something new where you do not know the name of every obstacle or the ability to recite the hype man’s speech by heart.

WEEKEND CHALLENGESChallenges Completed on Back to Back Days

The Ancient Warrior Challenge: This is a good option for beginner OCR athletes looking for a new challenge. This simply requires completion of a Warrior Dash and any distance Spartan Race in one weekend. This is definitely a good challenge for those wanting to dip the toe in the world of back to back racing.  Get in touch with your ancient combat spirit with this challenge for beginners.

ancientwarrior

SOF Weekend or the Modern Warrior Challenge:  Special Operation Forces (SOF) is a broad term that encompasses all of America’s Special units including but not limited to Navy SEALs, Special Forces, Marine Special Operations, Air Force Special Tactics Squadron and more.  SOF weekend is the completion of two different special operations military events in one weekend. An example is doing a BattleFrog on one day and the Green Beret Challenge or a GORUCK the next day.  BattleFrog is inspired by Navy Seals and Green Beret Challenge along with GoRuck are inspired by Army Special Forces.  GORUCKS also occur at various times, which allows for the possibility of doing BattleFrog and a GORUCK within the same day.

Muti-Lap Mudder: This requires a Tough Mudder event that spans two days. The idea is to complete as many laps as possible on each day. Saturday the course is typically open longer so more than likely you will have time to finish two or maybe more on Saturday.  Sunday there is typically only time for one lap.  Either way, with a 3 lap minimum covering 30 miles or more, this is a challenge for those looking to extend their training volume or prepare for one of the longer OCR events.

YEARLY CHALLENGES OR SPANNING MULTIPLE YEARS

The Touch of Death: This one is tricky because it requires completing multiple events and then hoping that a couple of them eventually meet the criteria for the Touch of Death. While no one hopes that OCR series go under, it is a fact of the business that several events have shown up and disappeared just as quickly. To qualify for The Touch of Death, it requires completing three events that eventually go under. This shows that you have the mental fortitude and physical strength to stick with OCR despite the rise and fall of companies.  So if you were at Super Hero Scramble, Hard Charge, Atlas Race, Hero Rush or any of the other events that folded, then congratulations, you have the Touch of Death.

The 24 hour Triple Crown: With only a handful of reoccurring 24-hour races for OCR in the world this is a challenge worthy of any ultra-distance athlete.  This can be accomplished all in one year if you are aggressive or spread out over several years.  While most people are satisfied with one 24 hour race in their lifetime, the Triple Crown requires completion of three different race events.  So if you did World’s Toughest Mudder three times, that still counts as only one for the Triple Crown.  To earn this accolade, you are going to have to branch out to events like 24 Hours of Shale Hell in Vermont, Battlefrog Xtreme 24 in Florida, Enduro 24 in Australia or Viper 2 Four in Malaysia.

Tri24hrs

US Ultra-OCR: Let’s say the 24-hour Triple Crown is currently above your reach, but you still want an ultra distance challenge.  The US Ultra-OCR requires the completion of four ultra-endurance competitive OCR events.  Finishing events like Spartan Ultra-Beast, World’s Toughest Mudder, Battlefrog Xtreme, BFX 24 or Shale Hell (8 hr or 24 hr version).

World Championship Contender: Instead of arguing, over which world championship is the most legitimate or which is the hardest, why not put your money where your mouth is and race them all.  Currently, this requires the completion of the OCRWC, Spartan World Championship, BattleFrog World Championship and World’s Toughest Mudder.  Want to up the difficulty? Do them all in one calendar year.

The Pentagram of Suffering:  To reach the pinnacle of pain, completion of five selection type events is required.  This includes, but is not limited to: GORUCK Selection, Death Race, Fuego y Agua, SISU Iron and Agoge.

If you think these challenges are still below your level, try adding your own requirements like trying to qualify for the OCR World Championships at every event included in the challenge or trying to podium at every event included in each challenge.

If you like these ideas, then comment below or on Facebook to tell Matt B. Davis to get off his ass and make virtual race medals (in addition to the Cranky Bastard) associated with completing these feats of strength.  Post on which ones you like the most so Matt can get busy designing the race medals and you can get recognition for your accomplishments that span multiple companies.