Altra King MT 1.5 Shoe Review

Altra King MT 1.5
4.4 / 5 Overall
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Features
Durability
Grip
Water Draining
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The Altra King MT 1.5 is the second edition of the King MT line. When the original King MT first came out many people in the OCR community were excited that an Altra shoe finally had aggressive lugs to complement their signature Foot Shape toe box. Reports of the King MT having some wear issues in the form of upper blow outs kept me from trying the first edition, but when I heard that the 1.5 was boasting a reinforced upper and improved drainage I knew it was time to give the King MT line a shot.

Altra King MT 1.5 Features

Specs

Lugs: 6mm

Drop: Zero Drop. 19mm/19mm

Weight: 8.5 oz. / 241 g

Insole Footbed: 6mm

Vibram Megagrip Outsole- Like it’s predecessor the King MT 1.5 has 6mm aggressive lugs that are made with Vibram’s rubber compound. If you are looking for grip in mud and on obstacle surfaces it’s hard to go wrong with this aggressive lug pattern coupled with the Vibram rubber.

Footlock Strap- This velcro strap allows you to quickly loosen or tighten the midfoot of your shoe as you encounter downhills or unpredictable terrain.

Foot Shape Toe Box- If you don’t already know, Altra makes shoes with a more natural foot shape. This provides a wider fit than most shoes and is a popular choice at longer distance Obstacle Races.

StoneGuard- This rockplate sits in the center of the shoe and protects the foot from rocks while running.

Protective Rip Stop Nylon- The upper material has been updated to a stronger rip stop nylon. The original version of the shoe saw many reviews complain that the upper material had blow outs on very low mileage. This material increases the durability, does not hold water and is lighter than the old material.

Drainage Vents- This shoe was designed for better drainage after water submersions. At the front and the sides of the shoe where the protective layers are sewn on Altra added vents that allow water to leave the shoe very quickly. These were not present on the previous model.

Altra King MT 1.5 Usage

I tested these shoes thoroughly on hilly trail runs, a Mudman Training beach session and at Maryland Savage Race on a very muddy course. The Altra King MT 1.5 handled each of these testing sessions well and allowed me to really get a feel for the versatility of the shoe as well as the Pros and Cons.

OCR Specific Usage Sessions:

Mudman Training on the Beach

The King MT 1.5 was great on the trail runs that I used them on so when the opportunity to test them at an OCR specific beach workout arose I was excited to give them a shot. There really isn’t  a good shoe suited for running or working out in the sand so while the King MT 1.5 grip was certainly overkill for this workout I was curious how much sand would get in my shoe. The workout consisted of a sandy uphill bucket carry (up and down), a bear crawl (up and down), a run up and down the hill, and strength based workouts (snatches, atlas shoulder throws, squats, etc). These exercises were then done for 3 rounds. While I certainly had sand in my shoe I can honestly say I thought there would be more. Had I worn gaiters there would have been much less as most of the sand made it’s way in by my ankles. The only downside I find with wide toe box shoes is that the sand likes the extra space by the toes and can accumulate there. The clean up from this was simple: rinse, drain, air dry with a fan. They looked as good as new.

Savage Race

I was excited that I would get to test these shoes for Obstacle Racing Media at, well, an Obstacle Race! If you don’t test the shoe out in unpredictable situations you may miss some small quirks with the shoe. While Savage Race Maryland is not considered a “hilly” course there are a few climbs that will test the grip of your shoes when it is muddy, and it was muddy this year. The King MT 1.5 really shined on these muddy inclines. As people were crawling and grasping with their hands at anything they could grab I was methodically making my way up the muddy hills without any issue at all. The 6mm lugs dug right in and after the first hill I knew I wouldn’t have any grip issues the rest of the day in the mud.

Thanks to the Vibram rubber compound on the outgsole of the King MT 1.5 my traction was very secure on the man made obstacles such as the A-Frame (muddy wood), Colossus and Twin Peaks. While some folks struggled to get their feet set there weren’t any instances were I struggled with my footing.  I’m not suggesting these shoes couldn’t slip on a muddy and wet wall or a wet tree stump in the forest, but the Vibram compound is above average in these situations.

The drainage of the shoe was amazing. There are multiple full water submersions at Savage Race and at no point did I even think of my feet after leaving the water and beginning to run. The water drained out quickly and left me taking very few “squishy” sounding running strides.

The only real negative that I encountered with the shoes’ performance was that when the shoe was wet the insole slid to the forefoot on each downhill that I “bombed” down. After the first time that the insole slid I pulled the velcro strap tighter hoping that it would stop, but it did not.  This is a common issue that I have had in the past with the Altra Lone Peak and it continues with the King MT 1.5. It is a minor annoyance, but it certainly would be nice for that to get taken care of in the future.

At the end of the race I took off my shoes as I was curious how much of the mud had stuck to the bottom. There was a bit at the heel of the shoe but nothing that caked on so much that it covered the lugs. The forefoot had almost nothing on it which is a huge positive as I am a forefoot striker and rely heavily on the grip at the front of the shoe. Seeing the lugs relatively clean made sense as I never felt any issues with grip and never had to clean any mud off of my shoes during the race. 

 Altra King MT 1.5 Durability

I ran hard through trails, hills, rocks, roots, sand and man made obstacles with the intention of putting this shoes durability to the test. I heard about the previous model having durability issues with the upper material and I was curious to see if it had actually been corrected. To my delight it was. With the exception of a few stray stitches that were broken this shoe is showing very little signs of wear on the upper and the outsole. If you were burned by the previous model and had a blowout but liked the shoe otherwise I would recommend giving the 1.5 a try.

Altra King MT 1.5 Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Incredible grip in messy conditions
  • Great traction on solid surfaces (Thanks Vibram!)
  • Above average drainage
  • Upper material does not hold water
  • Improved durability
  • Wide toe box
  • Sharp looking design

Cons

  • When bombing downhills with wet shoes the insoles shift forward. This is a recurring issue for me in Altra shoes.
  • The Heel does not lock in well which exacerbates the sliding forward insole issue. This is another common complaint of mine with Altra shoes. Some folks suggest alternate lacing patterns to help limit this.
  • Relatively Heavy(ish) if you are an Elite Racer gunning for that top spot.

Altra King MT 1.5 Conclusion

I had high hopes for the Altra King MT 1.5 shoe when I opened the box and it did not disappoint. The aggressive lugs, ability to drain and wide toe box make this a perfect shoe for events like World’s Toughest Mudder, Toughest Mudder, Spartan Beast, Spartan Ultra and the F.I.T. Challenge Ultra where you need performance and long term comfort. Altra heard the feedback on durability and drainage on the original model and delivered a shoe that addressed those concerns. I look forward to strapping these on (literally) and taking on more muddy courses in the future.

 



Keith Allen

Keith Allen is an Air Conditioning Salesman and an exhausted father of two. When not carrying his children around in Baby Bjorns he is often found cooking delicious homemade quesadillas to fuel his hunger from running OCR's

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Topo Athletic Hydroventure Review – Waterproof Shoes for Trail and OCR

Topo Athletic Hydroventure
4 / 5 Overall
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Durability
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Water Draining
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We recently got in touch with Topo Athletics to review the Top Athletic Hydroventure shoes. They were rated Gear of the Year by National Geographic Adventure, so we needed to find out if they lived up to the hype! 

They certainly live up to their waterproof claim, as discovered on some wet and muddy trails as winter turned into spring in Georgia! They are also, without a doubt, the lightest pair of trail shoes I’ve had the pleasure of beating to death on Kennesaw Mountain. While more geared toward trail running than OCR, these would certainly be great for certain courses that don’t require the deep lugs.

Topo Hydroventure Features

The Topo Hydroventures boast not only their lightweight waterproof membranes but also a full-length, flexible rock plate to prevent stone bruising. This is extremely important since you expect a shoe that protects your soles from stone-bruising to also be heavy laden. Thankfully, this is not the case with the Hydroventures. I found myself feeling that these were simultaneously delicate (so lightweight and comfortable) and unyielding. It’s much rarer to find applicable shoe reviews geared toward women, so when I found these shoes, I knew I needed to let all of our female readers know about these powerhouse shoes!

Other notable features are:

  • The Roomy Toe Box: These are noticeably boxier and wider in the toe box than other trail and OCR shoes like the All Out Crushes or Reebok All Terrains. This allows for your feet to freely form their proper strike position during a run.
  • Lug Rubber Outsole: The high-traction outsoles made the transition from sand to gravel to thick mud to puddles seamless with the design that allows the shoe to release the “crud” you would normally pick up from the trail which weighs down the shoes.

Topo Hydroventure Usage

I used the Hydroventures on some pretty technical trails around Georgia. The hills and mountains, covered in mud, sand, and rocks, provided a well-rounded picture of how these shoes hold up on various terrain. They also made their OCR debut during the Atlanta Warrior Dash!

I really enjoyed running in these due to their low drop. While they aren’t zero drop, they do have a low, 3 mm heel to toe drop which is important to me, and many other runners who prefer as minimal of a shoe as possible, while still being protective. The Hydroventures also have the lower stack height of Topo’s other trail shoes and is the only women’s trail shoe from Topo with a full-length rock plate.

These have taken a beating for weeks, being the only shoes I want to wear on the trails due to their extreme comfort. While they are the lowest cushioned of the Topo trail shoes, I can’t imagine needing any more cushion or support than the Hydroventures give. I would wear these around town if I wasn’t worried about wearing down the soles on concrete!

I didn’t have to “break them in” by doing those weird things we all do to break in trail shoes – wearing wet socks or bending them back and forth for hours. They felt extremely comfortable right out of the box, slipped on over thin, synthetic ankle running socks, and taken immediately out to the trails. I found them extremely flexible, and it was easy to forget I was wearing brand new shoes at all.

Topo Hydroventure Durability

Once I’m no longer carrying this extra weight in the front (I’m now far enough along in pregnancy to be front-heavy), I’ll be taking these on the bigger OCR courses to see how they do at races like Spartan, Savage, and Tough Mudder.

I have no doubts about the future durability of the Hydroventures, however, due to how well they’ve held up thus far through my long runs on technical terrain. They’ve already gone about 50 miles and still look brand new, in spite of all that I’ve put them through. Even the laces are holding up well compared to other trail shoes I’ve run in! The uppers feel very durable, and not thin like many of the other shoes on the market, with the waterproof coating helping to seal the durability of the upper material.

Topo Hydroventure Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Roomy toe box
  • Comfort and cushion
  • Mud-release outsole lugs
  • Low heel to toe drop (3 mm)
  • Waterproof
  • Fit true to size
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • I could do with more color options!
  • They could be a little more flexible from left to right, straight out of the box, but that will get better as they loosen up during continued use.
  • If only they had deeper lugs to make these the perfectly rounded OCR shoe – allowing for better grip on obstacles!
  • The drainage could be improved, for when you really need to submerge – they are very waterproof, but there are sometimes when the water is just going to get in the shoe, and the drainage took a little longer than I preferred.

 

Topo Hydroventure  Verdict

I will definitely be looking into more Topo shoes and if these ever happen to burn out on me, they will be replaced immediately. I would recommend these to the runners who spend most of their time training and running on trails over recommending using them for obstacle races. The Topo Hydroventures could certainly hold their own on some of the courses I’ve run in past seasons but are more suited for trail running.

The waterproof feature is also going to be appealing to other runners in wet climates such as the northwestern U.S. and our readers across the pond who put in hundreds of miles in the rainy climate of the U.K.

Should you add Topo Hydroventure to your collection of trail shoes? Without a doubt! You will find these to be lightweight, comfortable, and durable, nearly all that we can ask for from a trail/OCR shoe.



Keith Allen

Keith Allen is an Air Conditioning Salesman and an exhausted father of two. When not carrying his children around in Baby Bjorns he is often found cooking delicious homemade quesadillas to fuel his hunger from running OCR's

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Salming OT Comp Shoe Review

Salming OT Comp
4.1 / 5 Overall
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It’s Salming not Salomon, although both companies are stellar in terms of quality and performance.  Literally the second I slipped the Salming OT Comp (Off Trail Competition) on my foot I knew the shoe was something special.  It was just so light and comfortable and looked so rad, like a performance track shoe made just for the mud.  The mesh fiber embodying the shoe and the aggressive lugs on the bottom looked like they would perform superbly in any condition.

Salming OT Comp Features

Aggressive Sole Lugs  – The lugs on these shoes are made for the sloppiest of mud and the steepest of mountains.  By the makers of Michelin tires, these soles will have you putting the pedal to the metal while maintaining traction through the mud. However, don’t run on pavement or these lugs will surely wear off.

Mesh Fiber – The upper is composed of a fiber mesh that wicks away moisture as it glides through the air.

Super light weight– 9 ounces

 

Salming OT Comp Usage

I showed up to this years Atlanta Savage Race with my New Balance Minimus shoes because I know they stay on my feet in mud, are lightweight, and are minimalist, meaning they are good for tip toeing through the forest.  I started the race however wearing the Salming OT Comps, and it was like going from a 2012 Toyota Celica to a 2018 Subaru Outback with mud tires, from quick and snug to quick, snug, lean, and mean.  Starting around noon the mud puddles had plenty of time to get super sloppy. I took the shoes for all they were worth and stormed straight through every mud slop puddle with a vengeance.   The lugs shot through the slop and grabbed onto solid ground as they propelled me to dry ground.  The six miles went by quickly.  The obstacles were all tackled smoothly with the shoes except for Balls to the Wall, where I wish I would of had my Minimus’ on because they are good on the climbing holds.  The OT Comps don’t have as much of a pointed toe as the Minimus’, however, for everything else, they were superior in ability.

Salming OT Comp Durability

As long as they are used off road, they will last a long time.  They are made just for mud and trails.

Salming OT Comp Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Streamlined
  • Comfortable
  • Durable
  • Rugged

Cons

  • Although they are comfortable, at least for up to six miles, there is not much support in terms of arch.  My feet hurt for a week.  They will take some time to break them in.

 

Salming OT Comp Conclusion

The Salming OT Comp is fresh to the OCR world and has come on strong.  They made this shoe just for mud runs and wicked terrain.  The Michelin soles and their extreme lugs hold their own to any shoe out there.  I would definitely recommend them to any OCR athlete or even ultra trail runner for that matter.  I just recommend breaking them in and doing some short runs before going on any long runs in them.  They are gorgeous, sharp looking, and in comparison with other OCR shoes, they are affordable.



Keith Allen

Keith Allen is an Air Conditioning Salesman and an exhausted father of two. When not carrying his children around in Baby Bjorns he is often found cooking delicious homemade quesadillas to fuel his hunger from running OCR's

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Inov-8 X-Talon 230 Review

Inov-8 X-Talon 230
4.5 / 5 Overall
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Ask any racer what their most important gear is on race day, and you can be certain the majority will give you the same answer: “It’s gotta be the shoes!” And there is no more recognized brand in OCR, than Inov-8. Their proven history of quality shoes, for all running and race types, has culminated with the newest iteration of their original trailblazer shoe – The Inov-8 X-Talon 230. I reached out to Inov-8 for a chance to review their newest release, and was psyched to have them at my doorstep this past week. Let’s see what they’re made of.

Inov-8 X-Talon 230 Features

PHENOMENAL GRIP

“New industry-leading STICKY GRIP™ rubber delivers better traction than its predecessor over both wet and dry underfoot conditions.” Inov-8 calls these shoes “The next generation of trail running shoes.” They have an aggressive 6mm stud, which made my snow, mud, and ice filled run seem like it was a trail on a sunny Spring weekend. If you’re like me, you are constantly looking for the next solid step when running through questionably steady terrain, the X-Talon’s offer a sturdiness in my step that I haven’t felt in another shoe. When you stop worrying about how each step may compromise your footing, you can truly enjoy your run, regardless of the conditions. The X-Talon’s helped me make easy work of loose mud and snow on the trails.

RENOWNED GRIP

Iconic 8mm studs not only claw through soft terrain but also hold firm on harder ground. The X-Talon’s grip excels on unstable ground, as well as in the gym. Traversing streams, doubling back over trails full of mud, or tackling an 8 ft wall, the X-Talon held on like no other shoe I’ve worn before. And those studs were perfect for climbing a rope.

INCREASED PROTECTION

Second-generation META-PLATE is a rock plate that protects the underfoot from sharp rocks. We’re all kids inside, aren’t we? If you’re like my and my inner child I am constantly jumping from rock to rock as I am out on the trail. The protection built into the X-Talon shoes allows me to save my arches as I mountain goat around in the wilderness.

Inov-8 X-Talon 230 Durability

Right out of the box, the X-Talon shows off its tough build and durable form. The materials of the shoe wrap around your foot, like it was custom molded for my appendages. It’s flexibility allows for ease of movement while I run, while still protecting my toes from being caught on jutting rocks, or rogue branches hanging off the occasional fallen log. The X-Talon is wrapped in durable materials around the side, and toes, which will hopefully prevent tearing, and blowouts – an issue I’ve had with my wide feet in the past.

Pros

  • Amazing grip on almost all terrain.
  • Much soft, more cushioned steps as compared to past X-Talon releases
  • Sturdy design and durable materials ensure they’ll last me the race season and beyond.

Cons

  • Inov-8’s “precision fit”is a slim design and may not fit all peoples individual footprint. I usually have to go up a size to get a fit that doesn’t crunch my toes together.
  • The X-Talon is heavier than other OCR shoes, weighing in at 230g.
  • Sorry Inov-8, you still haven’t mastered my adesire to run full speed on ice.

 

Inov-8 X-Talon 230 Conclusion

In the past I was an avid fan of Inov-8’s Trailroc Series shoes. They were versatile, had a good grip, and performed well in all weather but lacked protection, and a good landing surface for heavy footed runners like myself. The X-Talon fills those gaps and more. They’ve delivered in the brutal, sometimes menopausal weather of New England. There’s nothing like a clean pair of new shoes fresh out of the box, but the first thing I wanted to do was get these babies dirty. I was in the mud and show as fast as I could lace these shoes up, and I couldn’t be happier with them. I see them becoming an extremely popular shoe for this upcoming obstacle course season. For me, they have the perfect balance of soft landing, with base level protection, grip, and pliability for everything we do on a typical race weekend.



Keith Allen

Keith Allen is an Air Conditioning Salesman and an exhausted father of two. When not carrying his children around in Baby Bjorns he is often found cooking delicious homemade quesadillas to fuel his hunger from running OCR's

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Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Review

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom
2 / 5 Overall
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The Reebok All-Terrain Freedom is Reeboks 2017 more general purpose trail running shoe offering to pair with the aggressive All-Terrain Super 3.0. Last year they had released the Thrill which was a great middle ground shoe that maintained many of the similar features to the Super, but this shoe is not as similar in its pairing. One of the notable design changes you will notice in the All-Terrain Freedom is the lack of drainage ports which has been a long time staple of the All-Terrain shoe series along with the fully one piece upper.

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Features

Seamless Upper  – The big update to the All-Terrain Super 3.0 was the seamless upper and they mostly mirrored that design in the All-Terrain Freedom. One thing that makes this stand out is that while the Super had a flap that allowed for more variation in upper sizing this one does not. It is truly one piece as you can see from the photos.

Grooved Sole With Deep Lugs – Another slight deviation from the normal copy and paste style design was a revision of the lug design. They kept similar core center lug style but changed the perimeter completely.

Minimal Drop – The drop has been measured at 5mm which will be a welcome middle ground for many people. While 2-3mm is generally considered a low drop shoe this comes in just above that. It is a great shoe drop to transition from what is a more commonly used 8-9mm drop on your way to a no drop or truly minimal drop shoe.

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Usage

What you will notice as soon as you slide your foot into the stretchy one piece upper is a critical flaw in the one piece upper design for the All-Terrain Freedom. Unless your foot is the exact diameter of the opening, or slightly larger, there will be bunching when you tighten the laces. This is incredibly uncomfortable, impractical, and shocking that this passed the many stages that it must take to design a shoe at a company. Did no one ever try these on and say, “Let me tighten the laces so the shoes don’t move around while I run on a trail.” ?

This flaw basically precludes the rest of the usage section. I swear I tried to run in these shoes and I run in many shoes for review that are generally uncomfortable, but I couldn’t run in them more than twice. The All-Terrain Super 3.0 had this problem solved by doing a pseudo one piece upper, why didn’t these? Was it the same reason they removed the drainage ports – to prevent debris?

I’m left with more questions than answers after using the All-Terrain Freedom. The grip felt about standard and cushioning felt in line with a cushioned trail shoe. The cushion stack may have ridden a little tall for my preference when it comes to trail shoes but this is more of a personal preference.

 

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Minimal Drop at 5mm

Cons

  • Poorly designed upper
  • No drainage ports

Similar Products

Reebok All Terrain FreedomReebok All Terrain Super 3.0Reebok All Terrain Thrill
Weight335g220g320g
Heel Drop5mm5mm13mm
Grip3/16"3/16"3/16"
Metal StudsNoNoNo
Price$69.99$99.99$125.00
ORM ReviewYesYesYes
BuyAmazonReebokAmazon

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Conclusion

If you are wondering still if you should buy this shoe or not, I would suggest not to. There are many great cushioned trail running shoes out there, even the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 that these were modeled after – but often a copy isn’t as good as the original. The one way that I can suggest these shoes is if you try them on in person to see if your foot fits the upper exactly when tightened, or from a website with free returns. The Reebok All-Terrain Freedom is clever with the one piece upper, but maybe a little too clever for their own good.



Keith Allen

Keith Allen is an Air Conditioning Salesman and an exhausted father of two. When not carrying his children around in Baby Bjorns he is often found cooking delicious homemade quesadillas to fuel his hunger from running OCR's

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Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Shoe Review

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0
4.3 / 5 Overall
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Reebok has released their latest model in the most popular line of shoes made specific for OCR, the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0. The newest version of the shoe has several major changes that look to improve upon past versions. They have added reinforcement around the areas the shoes commonly rip while also completely changing the uppers material. Another thing worth noting, that I will cover in more detail, is the new lacing system that is unlike any I have seen before.

There is a love/hate relationship within the community based on the people who preach unparalleled drainage, excellent grip and OCR specific features, that stand opposite those who saw it’s a 1-3 race shoe before you’re contacting Reebok customer care for an exchange/refund/discount. The ripping could be explained by the narrow fit of the shoe, past materials used and grueling conditions they’re put through with each race. To view all the comparisons between the 3.0’s and past models read up here. If you have owned past versions, or looked at the comparisons to previous versions, you can tell Reebok is trying to get it right without going to far from the initial vision. To make a lightweight, durable, water draining shoe for obstacle course racing.

 

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Features

Dura-Grip Seal  – On any other shoe I wouldn’t be listing a rubber seal grip as a feature but this is the first and last concern 9/10 people will inquire about. The “Dura-Grip” rubber is reinforcing the toe box where the previous models were widely known for tearing. It looks like Reebok heard the call for correction(or got tired of replacing shoes for this issue).

Rope Pro – The Reebok All-Terrain line has always been praised for their OCR specific features. The “Rope Pro” is an exterior tread that originates on the bottom midsole of the shoe and continues its journey up the side of the shoe all the way to the laces. This sticky tread is found on the interior outsole of both shoes placed to optimize grip for rope climbs whether you lock both feet onto the rope with the base of your midsole or utilize the efficient hook method with your shoe. This tread is also efficient in wall traverse midsole grip and for several other obstacles.

Drainage Holes – Reebok produced the first shoe in the sport to use factory drainage ports. Many remember how these were met with rave reviews, followed by repetitive complaints on debris collection from the ports. This feature has been unchanged from inception through multiple releases of the Reebok All-Terrain line. If you loved the drainage on previous models and felt some debris was a small price to pay, you’ll be happy.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Usage

I was on the side of those that experienced durability issues in the past with this line of shoe and was a skeptic on the Super 3.0 fixing this issue. For that reason I wanted to make sure to run these through the ringer, literally. Getting my hands on these at the back end of race season posed a challenge to find races and truly mimic the wear and (hopefully no) tear that race shoes go through. I found a perfect test at the FIT Challenge located in Rhode Island.

Those familiar with this race, know the technical terrain, natural elements and pressure applied to your shoes from the steep downhill paths used. Two laps (6.8 miles) of hills, rocks, trail, steep uphill and downhill treks. A concern I had was the painful ability to feel every rock, root and uneven terrain under your feet. The grip was as good as expected in comparison to previous models. One aspect I felt the all terrain line were effective in producing was a solid grip on the tread.

A new feature in the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 is the lacing system. The laces do not go through the shoe, rather through a stand alone piece of rubber that is separate from the tongue of the shoe. Personally this was a major drawback for me as the Reebok All-Terrain is already a low cut shoe lacking in ankle stability, this new lacing system does not allow for a lace lock tie method which would normally secure the shoe more firmly to your ankle. On steep downhills you have excess mobility in your ankle providing a less secure, less confident level of support.

Outside that event all usage of the shoe for a thorough test was on flat trail runs totaling around 150 miles. While I didn’t experience any tears similar to previous models I did have cause for concern detailed in the durability section of this review.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Durability

As previously stated they performed without any tears or visible separation in the outsole tread or toe cap. My concern was with the “Dura-Grip” seal that covers the toe box to reinforce the toe box. The seal only extended to the toe cap of the shoe and not the outside of the shoe where the tears have occurred in the past. As you can see from the picture they used a very thin material to cover a mesh webbing in the problem section of previous models. The material over the mesh began to pull away from the mesh. I fear that with regular use of the shoe in OCR settings the mesh and lining material will soften when wet and be a cause for concern.

The rubber lacing strip that secures the laces stayed secure to the shoe but was an area I kept an eye on, being a new design I haven’t seen in Reeboks or any other brand for that matter. There has been no issues with the new lacing systems durability.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Drainage Ports
  • “Rope Pro” obstacle targeted tread
  • Reinforced toe cap
  • “Rock Guard” located in the midsole

Cons

  • Diameter of drainage ports
  • Stand alone lacing system
  • Minimal ankle support
  • Lack of reinforced materials in previous troubled spots

Similar Products

Reebok All Terrain Super 3.0Reebok All Terrain Super ORVJ Sport Irock 2Merrell All Out Peak
Weight220g219g240g295g
Heel Drop5mm5mm6mm6mm
Grip3/16"3/16"3/16"1/4"
Metal StudsNoNoNoNo
Price$99.99$90.00$99.00$69.00
ORM ReviewYesYesYes Yes
BuyReebokAmazonPendingAmazon

 

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Conclusion

I went into this review with an open mind giving this model a clean slate from past issues in the Reebok All-Terrain line. I came out of this review optimistic that Reebok is listening to feedback and concerns from previous styles while maintaining the features that everyone loved, be it drainage or tread. I’m very curious to see how receptive others are on the new lacing system as this was a negative change for me. I’ll still be concerned with the material used on the outer toe box where previous models had durability issues. My final thought is that I’m cautiously optimistic that there will be less complaints of tears in the newest Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0.

 

 

For more photos see our preview of the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0

 



Keith Allen

Keith Allen is an Air Conditioning Salesman and an exhausted father of two. When not carrying his children around in Baby Bjorns he is often found cooking delicious homemade quesadillas to fuel his hunger from running OCR's

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