OCRWC Announces 2018 Venue!

Obstacle Course Racing World Championships Announces 2018 Location in the United Kingdom

New York, NY (November 6, 2017) – Adventurey, the parent company of the world’s first and only independent obstacle racing world championship today, announced details for 2018 Obstacle Course Racing World Championships in London, England October 19 – 21, 2018. The premiere event of the obstacle course racing (OCR) season will bring a truly global obstacle racing experience to the English countryside. The fifth year of the event will celebrate the best professional and age group competitors from around the world with athletes from over sixty-five nations expected to participate.

Race weekend will feature a 3K Short Course Championships on Friday, 15K Standard Distance on Saturday, and Team Relay Competition on Sunday, each showcasing the best racers from around the world. The event will build upon an already spectacular permanent obstacle course in Essex to create an international village, a diverse course, and an unparalleled experience for athletes, their supporters, and spectators. ͞

“After four years in North America, we knew that to truly be a global championship we would need to move outside the continent. Our team spent more than a year vetting various venues around the world and found this venue offered a unique opportunity to build something distinctly international, while bringing obstacle course racing back home to the UK,” said Adventurey CEO, Adrian Bijanada. “Athletes and their families should expect a world-class course showcasing global obstacle course racing brands, a diverse international village, and contributions from partners that are a reflection of the worldwide obstacle racing industry.”

“We’re honored & excited to be chosen to host the OCR World Championships in 2018. Obstacle racing originated in the UK so we’re very proud to be the showcase venue for this world-class event. Our multi-award winning courses & obstacles will allow the World’s team to create a truly epic athlete experience. We’re looking forward to working together & welcoming everyone,” said James Parrish Race Director at Nuclear Races, which will host the 2018 event.

Full details on how to qualify can be found on the OCR World Championships website. This year over seventy-five race series are set as qualifiers representing over forty countries. Additionally, for the first-time since its inception, athletes will have the ability to purchase “entry protection” insurance for the event. This will provide athletes the opportunity to receive a refund of their entry fee in the event of injury or other significant life events which may prevent them from attending the world championships.

“We recognize that events often happen in life and athletes plan the entire season around the OCR World Championships. The new registration insurance adds a level of protection for athletes when making the critical decision to register for our races. We hope this helps to set an industry standard moving forward” said Rachelanne Gladden, Director of Athlete Services.

The new location and new venue for OCR World Championships are set to create a fresh and vibrant OCR World Championship experience for returning athletes and open the door for a new contingent of global athletes with the move.

About the Obstacle Course Racing World Championships

Created by Adventurey, LLC, the Obstacle Course Racing World Championships is the first and only independent championship event in Obstacle Course Racing and requires athletes to qualify for a limited number of spots through a network of qualifying events. Designed to celebrate the athletes within the sport, the 2017 competition drew over 4,000 athletes from over 67 nations to compete for cash prizes in individual Elite, Age Group, and Team competitions, making it one of the broadest and most diverse races in obstacle course racing history. For more information, visit www.ocrworldchampionships.com.

About Nuclear Races

Nuclear Races are award-winning obstacle races on permanent farmland nestled just outside London in the county of Essex, UK. Founder & Race Director of Nuclear Races James Parrish is the fourth generation landowner of the 2,000-acre farm. Nuclear’s first race was in 2011 utilizing the natural terrain, obstacle build expertise & highly organized logistics needed to deliver obstacle races. The mission was to make fitness fun, achievable & while enjoying the outdoors at it’s best. Nuclear has an established & growing community who enjoy race-days & training throughout the year.

Media inquiries may be sent to Margaret Schlachter, Media Director – Margaret@ocrwc.com.

 

Tough Mudder UK Southwest 2017

 Tough Mudder South West UK 2017 – Badminton Estate

Last year, I joined a number of my work colleagues in my first ever Tough Mudder. I have always been skeptical about this event. I had previously taken part in two Spartan races, Invncbl, and some other minor obstacle course races in my area. For some reason, Tough Mudder had never appealed to me. I think I felt like I didn’t want to be tortured for a distance of 10 miles for a headband. But in the end, I mostly decided to take part because it was an excuse to do something ridiculous with a bunch of my friends.

 

All it took was the Kiss of Mud and I was hooked.

 

On the day, it actually took our team an unexpectedly long time to get through that first Tough Mudder, but I really felt that we took ‘team effort’ to a whole new level. At every obstacle, we waited for all of our crew to join us before moving on. From the Arctic Enema to Everest, we helped each other tackle the next nightmare whilst covered in mud and freezing cold (cheers Britain).

 

For weeks after, pictures circulated the office and we laughed at how epically we failed at some of the obstacles. We reminisced about how I got dropped on my back, how my legs cramped endlessly and how my manager almost chickened out of ‘Electroshock Therapy.’ It wasn’t long until I found myself wanting to do the whole damn thing again.

I thought everyone had shared my insane love of this form of torture. I was wrong. When the time came, I sent the obligatory chirpy email around the office attempting to recruit members for my team. Much to my dismay, big fat “no way!” responses were all I got.

Crap. I had spent the year training for Spartans and my ultras, thinking that I would be ready for Tough Mudder when it came to it… well at least I would be ready for a team challenge.  I slowly realised that I was going to have to go it alone.

Tough Mudder relies heavily on teamwork. This was something I had made great use of in 2016. And now, I would be going it alone. I hated the idea but was determined that despite my obvious lack of a team, I would do the race.

So the day came, I woke up bright and early ready for some mud.

Getting signed up for parking was easy (dare I say expensive, £10) Editor’s note: roughly $13 USD. Registration on the day was pretty simple, just filled in a few forms and was on my way. I was given a standby wristband as I wasn’t on a specific wave. So I took my time as there were waves leaving every 15-30 mins. I got in line for standby but wasn’t too impressed with the wait. We were in line for a good hour and a half before being let in. People in the ‘pig pen’ consisted of latecomers, those who were running the race again (absolute nutters), and those who were running for magazines or websites. Still, it took too long.

Finally, we got into a wave and took part in the obligatory workout and pep talk and pledge recital.

Then we were off!

If there is one thing that I have learnt from this year’s Tough Mudder, it was that I absolutely LOVE this stuff.

The course eased you into a grueling 10 miles of blood sweat and tears. It started with a short jog to ‘Skidmarked’ which really got us into the spirit of ‘leave no man (or woman) behind’.

On to Bail Bonds, Kiss of Mud, and Pyramid Scheme. The lack of helping hands at Pyramid Scheme made it difficult to do it properly. Was a bit disappointed. On the Hero Walls is where I really showed some grit. I was devastated last year to be dropped by a team mate. I made it up one wall this time. Small victories.

Arctic Enema came just after mile 3. For which I was eternally grateful. Plenty of time to recover, rather than be freezing cold.

Agustus Gloop or Snot Rocket (Legionnaires) were new to 2017 and were a heck of a lot of fun. Next came Devil’s Beard. I didn’t really get this one last time and still don’t (not my favourite).

Blockness Monster was just as fantastic as before, despite the water being just a little too deep for most people to even get a grip on the floor to help push it over. We relied heavily on the tall mudders to get it to the tipping point.

The Liberator, Birth Canal, and Lumberjacked. All solid obstacles. I didn’t stick around, I just got it done and moved on.

The course was very well planned out. 2016’s layout left a lot of next-to-impossible obstacles. In comparison, last year’s course was poorly planned out leaving many obstacles too slippery to have a good go at.

Last year,  Funky Monkey saw even the fittest racers fall at the first rung. This year was far more fun and more manageable that even I, EVEN I, got halfway across before face planting the water and almost winding myself. All part of the fun, hey?

‘Mud Mile’ was one of the highlights of my previous Tough Mudder experience. I loved every second this year but wished it was longer. Definitely was not a mile long – last year was longer. The racers really lived up to the Tough Mudder pledge in this one though. It was hard not to stop and help out your fellow mudders. Everyone really just wanted everyone else to make it to the end. My faith in humanity was restored.   

‘Hold Your Wood’ saw me joining forces with a team I was waiting in line with. What I really liked about this race was that despite me completing the obstacle with another team, there was no obligation on either party to then stick together. A quick chat, get the job done, a round of “well-done mate and good luck” and off they ran.

So, that was 9 miles down. 1 mile to go. I was getting TIRED.

With just Hero Carry, Everest, and Electric Shock left, I was getting worried. Everest was my nemesis from last year. It was one of the few obstacles that I just could not do no matter how hard I tried.  The Hero carry came and went without too much trouble, and although I wasn’t looking forward to it, I knew I could do Electro Shock Therapy.

But Everest…. I didn’t want to stand in line for 20 minutes, freezing and covered in flies, to try countless times to then have to walk around, ashamed of myself. As I rounded the corner from the Hero Carry I could see it. Thank goodness there were no queues and I had well and truly dried off from the epic face plant at Funky Monkey. I was ready for this.

Took a decent run at it, reached two hands (yes), held on (YES), swung my leg up and some other tough mudder (an absolute legend) grabbed it and pulled me up. YES!!!! I was beyond ecstatic (cue the awkward fist pump to myself – but I didn’t care). I ran up the final straight toward the finish line grinning like a goon. Just one more obstacle to go.

I had a choice, as a legionnaire I could choose Kong or Electroshock Therapy, I knew at this point my arms were shot and if I failed the last obstacle I would be devastated so I took on Electroshock Therapy instead. As I ran through I thought, “Dammit, should have done Kong!” I regretted calling all my teammates wimps last year for avoiding Electroshock Therapy last year. This round nearly floored me. I started running and got a shock that propelled me into a hay bale (in the course I might add). Face full of mud I straightened up only to get a shock in the face. These pictures are going to be incredible. Only a couple more strides to go. Inches from the finish, I sucked it up and rubbed some dirt in it. Crossed the line and was presented with some well-deserved rewards.

This Tough Mudder was definitely 10 miles of blood (bloody elbow), sweat (so much sweat) and tears (promise, there was just some mud in my eye). Epic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Tough Mudder and Author