Malaysia Spartan Sprint – Kicking off the Racing Year in Asia

While the USA is seeing freezing race temperatures, most of Asia is still sweltering in 95 degree heat, which was certainly the case for the Malaysian Spartan Sprint on March 12. The first race of the season saw a strong turn out with competitors flying in from Singapore, Hong Kong and as far as Abu Dhabi to join the fast-growing obstacle racing community in Malaysia.

As the sun rose, we were told there would be a slight delay in the start times due to a storm the previous evening, and an issue of wild boars and cows knocking over course markers! That announcement set the tone for what was an extremely challenging Sprint course – I use the term ‘Sprint’ loosely, as the race was almost 6 miles in distance.

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As we set off it started with a set of walls, hurdles, the vertical cargo and then into the jungle for what seemed like a never ending hill climb which continued to the sandbag carry. The terrain was either knee deep mud or uneven trails, and this didn’t let up for the whole course. There were so many river crossings that I lost count in the end, but they were actually a welcome relief from the heat.

The middle part of the race saw a whole heap of obstacles grouped together that were testing people’s stamina and grip strength. The Hercules hoist, a cliff climb, barbed wire crawl, rope climb, Olympus (making its debut in Asia), atlas carry and then rounded off with the spear throw, saw most people hitting the ground for at least 30 burpees.

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Another hilly run followed by a long bucket brigade on a muddy track, and then the end was in sight as you could hear the noise from the race village. A dunk wall, A-frame, more water and then a 200 foot swim which saw victims fall to leg cramps so close to the finish. An unexpected challenging river run against the tide, and on to the dreaded multi-rig which of course saw more people fail than master it.

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I have never been so happy to see a slip wall knowing the fire jump was straight after it.

As I said, a Sprint course like no other, where people were posting times closer to doing the Super distance.

The great thing about obstacle racing in Asia is it seems age is no barrier in participating. Colleen, the woman that won the elite category was only 18 years old and Tess, who came in third in the elite is 47 years old, both inspirational in different ways.

Next in Asia sees a Hong Kong race in April, followed by Singapore in May.

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Photo credits – Raimi Zakaria, Patrick Yap and Ruifeng Seet