Tifosi Optics Brixen – Custom – Review

Tifosi Optics Brixen
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Sunglasses, with shoes being the exception, are my favorite thing to wear, although they are often easy to lose or break.  Well I had already had the opportunity to test out the Tifosi Synapses in a prior review, so I decided that for the Tifosi Custom series review to test the Tifosi Optics Brixens – Custom.  The shield for the glasses was intriguing, so I thought I would give them a go.  I was able to pick the color of the frames, the lenses, and the ear pads for them.   I chose black, black, and more black.  I am definitely a fan of black.  Well, the lenses are actually smoke colored but you get the point.

Tifosi Optics Brixens Custom Features

Light weight –  These sunglasses are so light you can barely feel them on your face.

Super Comfy –   They feel literally like you aren’t wearing anything.

Aerodynamic –  Much better than running with a poster board ducktaped to your back.

Tifosi Optics Brixens Custom Usage

I went on several runs with these wonderful glasses on.  They blocked the sun extremely well and were so lightweight I could barely feel them on my face.  One thing that always comes up when I run with sunglasses on is whether the glasses fog up or not.  Well, like all sunglasses that I’ve worn, they fog up when I breathe in and out my mouth, and they do not fog up when I breathe in and out my nose.  It is definitely a lot harder to breathe in and out my nose.  I am usually huffing and puffing out my mouth, however, if I am mindful, I can practice breathing easy in and out my nose.  It was interesting to read and find out that both nose and mouth breathing are good for running.  I always thought nose breathing was the way to go.  Well, actually, breathing through your mouth brings in more oxygen.  So that is good to know.  It is said that just running with your mouth open is the way to go.  However, during cold runs, it is often said that breathing through your nose warms the air going into your lungs.  I don’t think it truly matters how you breathe during a run nonetheless, it’s just good to be running.

Tifosi Optics Brixens Custom  Durability

They seem to be quite durable.  I don’t think they would break if you dropped them,  but likely would if you run them over with your car.

Tifosi Optics Brixens Custom Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Comfortable
  • Optimal shade

Cons

  • Some fogging
  • Just another item to keep track of

 

Tifosi Optics Brixens Custom Conclusion

At close to $60, they are definitely in my price range for glasses.  They are a lot better than gas station or CVS sunglasses, which I usually buy, but not as expensive as Oakleys, Spys, Smith or the likes.   I really like these Brixon shields and will definitely will wear them for years to come, unless of course I lose them or run them over with my car, and in that case, the price is a good medium value.


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Clayton Griffith

One day, Clayton made the mistake of getting too close to ORM co-founder Matt Davis. Now, most weekends, he is stuck with Matt running on a trail, on some train tracks, or at obstacle races. He also been forced to take on additional duties, such as writing for ORM, manning the ORM tent, and watching Matt's kids, all against his will.

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Captain Kaufmann’s Playbook

OCR athlete Jeremy  Kaufmann has assembled 52 weeks of workouts to share with the world in his new book The Captain’s Playbook: More than a Beast as he journals his way through a year of training and races. The book is a collection of workouts and race reviews that chronicle his journey from November 2016 through November 2017. In that time, Jeremy passed many milestones, some OCR related, others personal, and it is clear that he put in a lot of hard work to get the results he achieved.

The format of the book is part diary and part workbook. Each set of workouts is accompanied by ruled pages for the reader to include his or her own results and notes. He includes the workouts he put together for himself, and he includes a few workouts from guest coaches as well. If you were ever curious about how much work the stronger athletes put in to achieve their results, you can now compare what you’re doing with what Kaufmann is doing. And then, if you want to keep yourself accountable, you can write in what you did during a particular week and see how it matches up.

That said, I would point out that these workouts are not for everyone. If you are trying to go from couch to Warrior Dash or your first Stadium Spartan Sprint, these workouts would knock you flat. However, if you are already young, fit and competitive, it could be useful to spy on what someone else is doing to keep up.

If you read between the lines, you can see that Kaufmann has a life beyond fitness and OCR. In his race recaps (some of them originally published here), he gives a first-person account of the races, but he also tells about getting injured and what is going through his head. His real life also “interferes” with his training: he gets married, he moves across the country, and he adopts a dog (a husky, so almost as cool as Ryan Atkins’ and Lindsay Webster’s malamute Suunto). Keep an eye out for Team Kaufmann and its captain in the years to come.

Altra King MT Shoe Review

Altra King MT
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King MT

Altra are famous for creating long distance running shoes with a zero drop profile, generous cushioning and a wider ‘foot-shaped’ toe-box designed to accommodate natural toe splay. With the King MT, Altra applies those principles into a more minimalist format, alongside great drainage and a rugged build making the Altra King MT the first shoe from Altra that would work well for obstacle course racing. Altra kindly provided this shoe for review and testing. Should this be your next OCR shoe? Read on to find out!

Altra King MT Features

Altra King MT Out-sole – Altra have chosen to use the Vibram Megagrip compound for the outsole of the King MT. The tread design is extremely aggressive, with row upon row of chevron shaped lugs, designed specifically for gripping in mud, snow, and wet conditions. I’ve been impressed with other shoes using this compound and I am pleased to see it used here.

Grip King MT Clean

Altra King MT Mid-sole – Altra’s Ego™ compound is used for the mid-sole on this shoe which is meant to be lightweight and consistent at providing cushioning in a wide range of temperatures. So, yeah… they work well in the cold. Trust me; Alberta Canada doesn’t hold back during the winter! The mid foot also has a rock plate, which is not always a feature of OCR shoes. The rock plate stops somewhere towards the forefoot, so you do get some mechanical dividends on the toe off and thoughtful protection where it is most required.

ALtra King MT 3

Altra King MT foot-bed – The foot-bed is really quite comfortable and I didn’t feel the need to exchange it for anything else. It is removable and can be exchanged for whatever kind of extra cushioning is desired. Critically for OCR it didn’t seem to shift or slop around even when it got extremely wet and muddy.

Altra King MT upper – The upper of the shoe is made from a rip-stop material, paired with a TPU overlay to keep the weight down without sacrificing durability. Altra have surrounded your heel with a weird kind of grippy one-way fabric that helps the shoe stay on when the mud wants to steal them. There doesn’t seem to be a rigid heel cup structure in this shoe and King MT will need to be locked down quite tightly to prevent lateral shearing of the upper and to take advantage of that sharkskin heel lock.

King MT close

The toe area features a rubber bumper to prevent toe stubs and the same protective material reaches up to the arch area also to protect from sharp twigs and rocks. The toe box itself has plenty of promised room laterally, but I felt like the ceiling was a little low for my fat big toe. Maybe I’m a freak in that department, but it was touching the uppers most of the time when running and I am concerned that my toe could start to wear a hole through here one day. No problems yet though.

King MT foot shaped

Altra King MT lacing – The laces on the King MT are fine. The extra eyelet is required and welcome to keep that heel locked in when the going gets muddy. The elephant in the room is the Velcro tie down, which has been quite polarizing for others who have reviewed the King MT. The idea is that you can lock down the mid-foot on hard descents and then loosen the fit slightly to provide a little more mid-foot volume for climbs. It is also a tie down for the laces. It works for the most part, except for my foot volume the upper strap is a touch too long at times.

Altra King MT lacing

The heel of each shoe features Altra’s Gaiter trap, and a gaiter loop at the end of the lace run. For those who want to use these shoes in snow, loose scree or talus, this is a welcome feature.

Grip King MT Gaiter

Altra King MT weight – At 289 g per shoe for a men’s 9.5, the King MT sits right in the mid-weight range for an OCR shoe.They are 70 g heavier per shoe than the Reebok All Terrain Super 3.0, and the similarly priced and very popular Salomon S/Lab Sense 6 SG but it remains 30 g lighter than the even more popular Salomon Speedcross 4.

King MT foot shaped weight 3

Altra King MT Usage

When you actually put them on, it makes sense. The shoes are designed to fit feet- not one particular sport modality. Altra seem to be letting your feet do what they naturally want to do, without getting in the way. The fit is comfortable and my toes have had plenty of room to move without forming hot spots! It might just take you some time to get used to the geometry of the Altra running style after running in conventional shoes. I would advise you to break them in well before racing in them.

King MT heel

On a long wintry trail run, these clung on about as well as other deep lugged shoes could. Biting the ground with each step, they work really well in everything I could throw at them (including a test on a sledding hill), chomping through muddy, root covered trails, snow, wet rock, muddy plywood, grass with no problems. When I needed grip or support, they generally offered plenty. I liked the zero heel to toe drop. It feels fast, as if the heel isn’t striking too early. 

King MT Altra running

While traction was great in the sagittal plane (e.g. running forwards and braking), lateral movements weren’t as sure. Look at the lug pattern and you will see the reason for this. There is less lateral grip than forward/backward directional grips. Creating some more offset between lugs could improve this. I would hate to slide out on a muddy bucket carry. It’s not a major flaw, but it could probably use some improvement.

King MT Grip2

The mid sole is protective and responsive. I ran on some pretty rocky trails with these and found them comfortable enough to not worry about where I was placing my feet. The real stress test for these was crossing a Lego-strewn floor without a trip to the E.R. The point is, they inspire a fast and aggressive running style across tough terrain, which is the kind of confidence you need to perform in OCR. 

If you’ve ran in Altra before, expect a firmer ride than you’d be used to. Altra classify this as a minimal cushioning shoe, yet I would say that the ride of the King MT is still comfortable enough for most of the distances you might find in OCR. It’s a lively shoe with plenty of energy return.

On the topic of drainage, these shoes have plenty of areas of open mesh and after a full submersion, they drained to feel just damp within about 200m of running. The water retention wasn’t significant.

Altra King MT Durability

You’ll have to dig around the interwebs for more details on extended use and durability. I’ve tested them on about 30 miles of some pretty unpleasant conditions in Alberta this November and they have held up well. No toes bursting forth (toes and fingers crossed). No loose seams. No cut eyelets. The strap has managed to avoid the scissors and the sole has barely shown any wear. The megagrip compound used for the outsole is the best in the industry and I have found that it wears extremely well – especially when compared to the compounds used by Salomon on the Speedcross line.

Altra King MT Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Versatile for OCR and beyond
  • Deep lugs with outstanding grip
  • Great fit and comfort
  • Durable outsole
  • Rock plate is very protective
  • Shoes are springy and responsive
  • The Zero Drop profile encourages good running form
  • Nice wide toe box to avoid crowding and blisters.

Cons

  • The midfoot strap may not work as planned for smaller feet
  • The shoes can lose grip slightly when moving or pushing laterally in mud
  • Can be quite expensive

Altra King MT Conclusion

Even as is, the Altra King MT strikes a nice balance between weight, grip and protection, but if I had to suggest one improvement it would be just to make a few adjustments to the lug arrangement for the next version. I love the extra thought and innovation in this shoe (mid-foot strap and the shark-skin grip in the heel) and I love how it comes to life in the muddiest, ugliest conditions. The result is a racing product that will work nicely for the obstacle course and many other off trail adventures. It’s fast, minimal and aggressive enough that elite racers should be considering it as a real contender for this race season.


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Clayton Griffith

One day, Clayton made the mistake of getting too close to ORM co-founder Matt Davis. Now, most weekends, he is stuck with Matt running on a trail, on some train tracks, or at obstacle races. He also been forced to take on additional duties, such as writing for ORM, manning the ORM tent, and watching Matt's kids, all against his will.

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Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves Review

Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves
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With Spartan Race putting their name on a pair of gloves, it seems like there are more and more “OCR gloves” popping up each week. This week, I took WarriorPak’s Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves for a spin both at the gym, and on course for a few races, to see what advantage, if any, these gloves have over the competition.

 

Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves Features

Sticky silicon palm that gives grip in any condition  – The biggest question about gloves for OCR is their ability to grip in the multitude of elements we face. Will they hold when they’re wet? Muddy? When the bars are slick? If I give Warrior Pak any credit, it’s certainly about these gloves grip in all aspects of the sport. Hanging from rings on the Platinum Rig, hoisting a Wreck Bag, and carrying an Atlas Stone is no issue with these gloves. My big gripe here is that there seems to be extra material in the palm that becomes folded over quite easy when gripping and navigating obstacles. This proved to be quite cumbersome at times.

Fingerless (ends at mid knuckle) to allow for tactile feel during a race – I’m not normally a fan of “fingerless” gloves because of how they tend to bunch up, and cut off feeling to my fingers. These offer a looser fit around the knuckles than most, with good flexibility in the fingers, for ease of movement while wearing them.

Breathable and lightweight – Warrior Pak has a flexible easy to slide on design with a very light fabric on the backside of the glove which does help water exit the gloves more easily than others I’ve tried on.

Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves Usage

I’ve used the Warrior Elite gloves for a handful of races now. The Ultra Beast in Quebec City, the US OCR Championships and in my OCR gym. I’ve always maintained that gloves will never be a fix-all for grip problems, and it’s no different for these gloves.

They can be, at times, prohibitive to use on obstacles. When I ball my hand up into a fist, as if I am gripping a rope, or bar, the material on the underside of the glove folds over and can actually cause my grip to fail, regardless of how well the material itself can hold on to a surface. The gloves don’t slide on and off as easily as I would like, which is really just more of an inconvenience and not an issue with the design. After one race, I stuck to my trend of using gloves for rope based obstacles, while keeping them in my pocket for Rigs, Monkey Bars, and Walls.

Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves Durability

The Warrior Elite gloves have put up with quite a serious workload in a short period of time. From 2 laps of the hardest course I have done, in the Quebec Ultra Beast, to the hot, dry terrain of sunny Texas over Labor Day, they have come out completely unscathed. No wear or tear shown at all, even after a trip through the washing machine.

Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Excellent grip against a multitude of surfaces
  • Good flexibility in the fingers and wrist
  • Durable and functional in all elements

Cons

  • Excess material in the palm folding over becomes really prohibitive for grip at time

 

 

Warrior Elite II Half-Finger Gloves Conclusion

If you’re looking for a pair of gloves to compliment your grip during OCR’s, WarriorPak has a solid option for you, in these gloves. At $21.95, they’re affordable and won’t break the bank. They come in cheaper than Spartan’s Fit Four ($29.95) options. You may find, as I did, that they may fold up under your hand, causing you to lose contact with obstacles. Their grip against steel obstacles however may outweigh that for you. I’ll continue to use these gloves in certain situations as they prove more durable than Spartan’s options, and their fit around my wrist and fingers seems more comfortable.


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Clayton Griffith

One day, Clayton made the mistake of getting too close to ORM co-founder Matt Davis. Now, most weekends, he is stuck with Matt running on a trail, on some train tracks, or at obstacle races. He also been forced to take on additional duties, such as writing for ORM, manning the ORM tent, and watching Matt's kids, all against his will.

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Tough Mudder CEO Will Dean writes “It Takes a Tribe”

In the tradition of CEOs penning their memoirs while their companies are still growing, the founder of Tough Mudder has written “It Takes a Tribe: Building the Tough Mudder Movement”  which outlines where the company came from, explains why it is such a success and hints at where it might go in the future.

These books can be a branding exercise – I know that I got handed more than one free copy of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s “Delivering Happiness”, which combined the up-from-nothing story of his company with a manifesto about how and why his company was so great. It has never been clear to me who exactly is the intended audience of this genre: MBA students? Potential investors? Prospective mid-level employees? They tend to be an easy read and provide a polished PR version of the company and its origins, but the format can be predictable.

There is one clear audience for these books: superfans. If you love Tough Mudder, you will love reading about how it came to be. “It Takes a Tribe” provides the inside scoop on how Will Dean turned his idea into a successful brand, how he helped create an industry that had not existed before, and how he has changed the lives of many who have joined Mudder Nation.

Happily, I may be something of a Tough Mudder fanboy, so I thoroughly enjoyed this behind-the-scenes look at TM’s origin story. And since I am a fanboy, I had heard many of the stories before, but it was entertaining to hear them again, and it was good to get Dean’s spin on many of the company legends.

In particular, it was fascinating to get Dean’s version what I think of as OCR’s Original Sin, the controversy over Dean’s using the concepts developed at the Tough Guy race by its creator “Mr. Mouse” and applying them to the Harvard Business School project that later became Tough Mudder. For those not familiar with the story, you may wish to watch Rise of the Sufferfests by Scott Keneally (which you should watch regardless, as it is a great documentary). The outline of the story is that Dean observed the Tough Guy event, consulted with Mr. Mouse and then built on those ideas to create Tough Mudder. Mr. Mouse sued and Harvard took Dean to task for violating the “Harvard Business School Community Values of ‘honesty and integrity’ and ‘accountability’”(and yes, if you find the concept of Harvard Business School trying to shame one of its graduates over ethics to be comical, you are not alone).

I had heard this narrative in Keneally’s film and in other sources, but for the first time in “It Takes a Tribe,” I got to see Dean’s side of the story. His version is convincing, but more than that the reader learns about the personal toll the litigation took on Dean and his colleagues. Dean also gets the opportunity to snipe about Harvard Business School days and his shabby treatment by the school after he graduated.

Dean is the tall Englishman on the right.

On the one hand, Dean does not hold back about his opinions about Harvard and his fellow HBS students. Similarly, he is not silent about his opinions of his former employers at the British Foreign Office, where he had a brief career before moving to the US. On the other hand, he frequently cites his experiences at both institutions in this book and uses them to demonstrate lesson after lesson about how he has used those experiences to make Tough Mudder the company it has become.

Like all MBAs who become CEOs, he compares himself with other entrepreneurs he admires, mostly ones he has worked with over the years. Of course, every entrepreneur wants to be compared to Steve Jobs, who gets name checked in the book more than once. In reality, Dean’s counterpart is, instead, Bill Gates: driven by numbers, looking years down the road, but not as obviously a genius. Dean has worked hard and kept focus, and his company has made steady, relentless growth by careful analysis and cautious progress. The bright orange obstacles with the cheeky names are thoroughly tested, tweaked, and re-launched to maximize the challenge they offer and to keep the customers returning. A very MBA approach to numbers guides everything the company does, and its success might be a tribute to that Harvard Business School education that keeps Dean so conflicted.

There is an obvious companion to “It Takes a Tribe,” namely Spartan founder and CEO Joe De Sena’s book “Spartan Up!” In fact, a recent search on Amazon has the two books listed under “Frequently Bought Together.” The two books are good representations of both CEOs and both brands. Dean’s book involves less derring-do, fewer personal exploits, and less lecturing. “Spartan Up!” also glosses over Spartan’s own Original Sin, its treatment of early Spartan superstar Hobie Call.  Both books include profiles of people whose lives have been changed by taking part in these events, and those who love transformation stories will get their fill in either book.

As the two dominant brands in OCR grow, they appear to be coming closer together. Tough Mudder was founded as a challenge-not-a-race, but the past few years have seen the introduction of competitive events from Tough Mudder ready for TV broadcast. Likewise, the fiercely individual Spartan Races have been emphasizing the role of teamwork in their summer reality series Spartan Ultimate Team Challenge. Both brands have launched exercise classes, Tough Mudder Bootcamp and Spartan Strong. Both have major clothing sponsors and both are expanding overseas. While their offerings start to converge, having a book like “It Takes a Tribe” will be a useful way to remember how the two companies and their founders are profoundly different.

Check out Will Dean on our Obstacle Racing Media podcast here

Fit Four Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves

OCR Neo Grip Gloves
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Inevitably the question of whether you should wear gloves to an OCR event will come up in your circle of friends. Official Spartan Race glove provider, Fit Four offered me the option to try some of their newly introduced OCR Neo Grip Gloves. Unlike tradition full coverage mitts, the Neo Grips are minimalist in design, geared towards protecting you from painful callouses while allowing you a wider range of motion throughout your race.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Features

Added cushion and anti-slip grip protection for OCR races  – The added grip these gloves provided really proved useful on obstacles like the rope climb, Hercules hoist, and plate drags. They provided a cushioned barrier for my hands, while not sacrificing the grip strength I’ve built up.

Original patented 4-finger minimalist gloves design – Can gloves without straps stay in place? How effective can such a small gloves be? The gloves hold tight around your hands without the need of straps or velcro. Their compression fit keeps them in place while navigating obstacles, running, trudging through mud or swimming. Having your fingers and palms free allows me to keep these on through the race if necessary but they’re also easy enough to slide off, should I want to tuck them in my pack when not in use.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Usage

Admittedly, I have only worn gloves to more easily navigate mud crawls. I’d slip them on to keep my hands protected as I rolled under barbed wire, etc. I had never considered gloves for the obstacles themselves. I’ve spent a few weeks using Fit Four’s OCR Neo Grip Gloves and there’s definitely a place in my gear box for these going forward.

I found the gloves to be both comfortable and durable. Their four-finger compression fitting wrapped the most vulnerable parts of my hands, like a tiny neoprene wetsuit. The gloves were well built and tough, but their minimalist design ensured I lost no effectiveness in my grip, even bolstering it during certain obstacles. They’re easily removed while running, should you rather attack the next obstacle with bare palms – but I’ll warn you – after wearing these, you’ll wonder why you have gone this long without them.

I’ve taken them to multiple OCR events as well as my local obstacle training gym, and I’ve found them to be helpful in both race and training situations.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Durability

Fit Four has developed these gloves using double-stitching to ensure durability and effectiveness during a Spartan Race. The compression fitting holds well while in use, and the neoprene design ensures that your hands can still “breathe” while wearing them. Small pieces of the foam lining have started to fall apart after repeated use, but this is mostly in spots where there is excess material and I have seen no change in the usability of the gloves because of this.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Simple, minimalist design
  • Superior callous protection
  • Form fitting without the need for velcro or straps
  • Open design allows for a good balance of protection as well as freedom of movement

Cons

  • Underside of gloves can bunch up and fold over during obstacles like Rigs and Monkey Bars
  • Open design can allow mud and rocks to gather easier than traditional gloves
  • Small pieces of material have pulled away, though no impact to usage

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Conclusion

While any pair of gloves will not replace the need to continue to work on grip strength training for obstacle races, Fit Four has found the sweet spot with the Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves for users who trust their grip but want to protect their hands and callouses during a race. These gloves are small enough to tuck into your pocket during a race and easy to put on and pull off without having to stop, which makes them a great addition to any race day supply list.

 

 


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Clayton Griffith

One day, Clayton made the mistake of getting too close to ORM co-founder Matt Davis. Now, most weekends, he is stuck with Matt running on a trail, on some train tracks, or at obstacle races. He also been forced to take on additional duties, such as writing for ORM, manning the ORM tent, and watching Matt's kids, all against his will.

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