Tough Mudder CEO Will Dean writes “It Takes a Tribe”

In the tradition of CEOs penning their memoirs while their companies are still growing, the founder of Tough Mudder has written “It Takes a Tribe: Building the Tough Mudder Movement”  which outlines where the company came from, explains why it is such a success and hints at where it might go in the future.

These books can be a branding exercise – I know that I got handed more than one free copy of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s “Delivering Happiness”, which combined the up-from-nothing story of his company with a manifesto about how and why his company was so great. It has never been clear to me who exactly is the intended audience of this genre: MBA students? Potential investors? Prospective mid-level employees? They tend to be an easy read and provide a polished PR version of the company and its origins, but the format can be predictable.

There is one clear audience for these books: superfans. If you love Tough Mudder, you will love reading about how it came to be. “It Takes a Tribe” provides the inside scoop on how Will Dean turned his idea into a successful brand, how he helped create an industry that had not existed before, and how he has changed the lives of many who have joined Mudder Nation.

Happily, I may be something of a Tough Mudder fanboy, so I thoroughly enjoyed this behind-the-scenes look at TM’s origin story. And since I am a fanboy, I had heard many of the stories before, but it was entertaining to hear them again, and it was good to get Dean’s spin on many of the company legends.

In particular, it was fascinating to get Dean’s version what I think of as OCR’s Original Sin, the controversy over Dean’s using the concepts developed at the Tough Guy race by its creator “Mr. Mouse” and applying them to the Harvard Business School project that later became Tough Mudder. For those not familiar with the story, you may wish to watch Rise of the Sufferfests by Scott Keneally (which you should watch regardless, as it is a great documentary). The outline of the story is that Dean observed the Tough Guy event, consulted with Mr. Mouse and then built on those ideas to create Tough Mudder. Mr. Mouse sued and Harvard took Dean to task for violating the “Harvard Business School Community Values of ‘honesty and integrity’ and ‘accountability’”(and yes, if you find the concept of Harvard Business School trying to shame one of its graduates over ethics to be comical, you are not alone).

I had heard this narrative in Keneally’s film and in other sources, but for the first time in “It Takes a Tribe,” I got to see Dean’s side of the story. His version is convincing, but more than that the reader learns about the personal toll the litigation took on Dean and his colleagues. Dean also gets the opportunity to snipe about Harvard Business School days and his shabby treatment by the school after he graduated.

Dean is the tall Englishman on the right.

On the one hand, Dean does not hold back about his opinions about Harvard and his fellow HBS students. Similarly, he is not silent about his opinions of his former employers at the British Foreign Office, where he had a brief career before moving to the US. On the other hand, he frequently cites his experiences at both institutions in this book and uses them to demonstrate lesson after lesson about how he has used those experiences to make Tough Mudder the company it has become.

Like all MBAs who become CEOs, he compares himself with other entrepreneurs he admires, mostly ones he has worked with over the years. Of course, every entrepreneur wants to be compared to Steve Jobs, who gets name checked in the book more than once. In reality, Dean’s counterpart is, instead, Bill Gates: driven by numbers, looking years down the road, but not as obviously a genius. Dean has worked hard and kept focus, and his company has made steady, relentless growth by careful analysis and cautious progress. The bright orange obstacles with the cheeky names are thoroughly tested, tweaked, and re-launched to maximize the challenge they offer and to keep the customers returning. A very MBA approach to numbers guides everything the company does, and its success might be a tribute to that Harvard Business School education that keeps Dean so conflicted.

There is an obvious companion to “It Takes a Tribe,” namely Spartan founder and CEO Joe De Sena’s book “Spartan Up!” In fact, a recent search on Amazon has the two books listed under “Frequently Bought Together.” The two books are good representations of both CEOs and both brands. Dean’s book involves less derring-do, fewer personal exploits, and less lecturing. “Spartan Up!” also glosses over Spartan’s own Original Sin, its treatment of early Spartan superstar Hobie Call.  Both books include profiles of people whose lives have been changed by taking part in these events, and those who love transformation stories will get their fill in either book.

As the two dominant brands in OCR grow, they appear to be coming closer together. Tough Mudder was founded as a challenge-not-a-race, but the past few years have seen the introduction of competitive events from Tough Mudder ready for TV broadcast. Likewise, the fiercely individual Spartan Races have been emphasizing the role of teamwork in their summer reality series Spartan Ultimate Team Challenge. Both brands have launched exercise classes, Tough Mudder Bootcamp and Spartan Strong. Both have major clothing sponsors and both are expanding overseas. While their offerings start to converge, having a book like “It Takes a Tribe” will be a useful way to remember how the two companies and their founders are profoundly different.

Check out Will Dean on our Obstacle Racing Media podcast here

Fit Four Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves

OCR Neo Grip Gloves
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Inevitably the question of whether you should wear gloves to an OCR event will come up in your circle of friends. Official Spartan Race glove provider, Fit Four offered me the option to try some of their newly introduced OCR Neo Grip Gloves. Unlike tradition full coverage mitts, the Neo Grips are minimalist in design, geared towards protecting you from painful callouses while allowing you a wider range of motion throughout your race.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Features

Added cushion and anti-slip grip protection for OCR races  – The added grip these gloves provided really proved useful on obstacles like the rope climb, Hercules hoist, and plate drags. They provided a cushioned barrier for my hands, while not sacrificing the grip strength I’ve built up.

Original patented 4-finger minimalist gloves design – Can gloves without straps stay in place? How effective can such a small gloves be? The gloves hold tight around your hands without the need of straps or velcro. Their compression fit keeps them in place while navigating obstacles, running, trudging through mud or swimming. Having your fingers and palms free allows me to keep these on through the race if necessary but they’re also easy enough to slide off, should I want to tuck them in my pack when not in use.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Usage

Admittedly, I have only worn gloves to more easily navigate mud crawls. I’d slip them on to keep my hands protected as I rolled under barbed wire, etc. I had never considered gloves for the obstacles themselves. I’ve spent a few weeks using Fit Four’s OCR Neo Grip Gloves and there’s definitely a place in my gear box for these going forward.

I found the gloves to be both comfortable and durable. Their four-finger compression fitting wrapped the most vulnerable parts of my hands, like a tiny neoprene wetsuit. The gloves were well built and tough, but their minimalist design ensured I lost no effectiveness in my grip, even bolstering it during certain obstacles. They’re easily removed while running, should you rather attack the next obstacle with bare palms – but I’ll warn you – after wearing these, you’ll wonder why you have gone this long without them.

I’ve taken them to multiple OCR events as well as my local obstacle training gym, and I’ve found them to be helpful in both race and training situations.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Durability

Fit Four has developed these gloves using double-stitching to ensure durability and effectiveness during a Spartan Race. The compression fitting holds well while in use, and the neoprene design ensures that your hands can still “breathe” while wearing them. Small pieces of the foam lining have started to fall apart after repeated use, but this is mostly in spots where there is excess material and I have seen no change in the usability of the gloves because of this.

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Simple, minimalist design
  • Superior callous protection
  • Form fitting without the need for velcro or straps
  • Open design allows for a good balance of protection as well as freedom of movement

Cons

  • Underside of gloves can bunch up and fold over during obstacles like Rigs and Monkey Bars
  • Open design can allow mud and rocks to gather easier than traditional gloves
  • Small pieces of material have pulled away, though no impact to usage

Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves Conclusion

While any pair of gloves will not replace the need to continue to work on grip strength training for obstacle races, Fit Four has found the sweet spot with the Spartan OCR Neo Grip Gloves for users who trust their grip but want to protect their hands and callouses during a race. These gloves are small enough to tuck into your pocket during a race and easy to put on and pull off without having to stop, which makes them a great addition to any race day supply list.

 

 


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Christopher is an attorney, a middle-of-the-pack triathlete, a marathoner, an open water swimmer, and a recovering Jeopardy contestant. A native New Yorker, he trains in the rugged wilderness of Central Park and can sometimes be found swimming in the Hudson. He also bakes pies. Delicious pies.
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Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Review

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom
2 / 5 Overall
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The Reebok All-Terrain Freedom is Reeboks 2017 more general purpose trail running shoe offering to pair with the aggressive All-Terrain Super 3.0. Last year they had released the Thrill which was a great middle ground shoe that maintained many of the similar features to the Super, but this shoe is not as similar in its pairing. One of the notable design changes you will notice in the All-Terrain Freedom is the lack of drainage ports which has been a long time staple of the All-Terrain shoe series along with the fully one piece upper.

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Features

Seamless Upper  – The big update to the All-Terrain Super 3.0 was the seamless upper and they mostly mirrored that design in the All-Terrain Freedom. One thing that makes this stand out is that while the Super had a flap that allowed for more variation in upper sizing this one does not. It is truly one piece as you can see from the photos.

Grooved Sole With Deep Lugs – Another slight deviation from the normal copy and paste style design was a revision of the lug design. They kept similar core center lug style but changed the perimeter completely.

Minimal Drop – The drop has been measured at 5mm which will be a welcome middle ground for many people. While 2-3mm is generally considered a low drop shoe this comes in just above that. It is a great shoe drop to transition from what is a more commonly used 8-9mm drop on your way to a no drop or truly minimal drop shoe.

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Usage

What you will notice as soon as you slide your foot into the stretchy one piece upper is a critical flaw in the one piece upper design for the All-Terrain Freedom. Unless your foot is the exact diameter of the opening, or slightly larger, there will be bunching when you tighten the laces. This is incredibly uncomfortable, impractical, and shocking that this passed the many stages that it must take to design a shoe at a company. Did no one ever try these on and say, “Let me tighten the laces so the shoes don’t move around while I run on a trail.” ?

This flaw basically precludes the rest of the usage section. I swear I tried to run in these shoes and I run in many shoes for review that are generally uncomfortable, but I couldn’t run in them more than twice. The All-Terrain Super 3.0 had this problem solved by doing a pseudo one piece upper, why didn’t these? Was it the same reason they removed the drainage ports – to prevent debris?

I’m left with more questions than answers after using the All-Terrain Freedom. The grip felt about standard and cushioning felt in line with a cushioned trail shoe. The cushion stack may have ridden a little tall for my preference when it comes to trail shoes but this is more of a personal preference.

 

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Minimal Drop at 5mm

Cons

  • Poorly designed upper
  • No drainage ports

Similar Products

Reebok All Terrain FreedomReebok All Terrain Super 3.0Reebok All Terrain Thrill
Weight335g220g320g
Heel Drop5mm5mm13mm
Grip3/16"3/16"3/16"
Metal StudsNoNoNo
Price$69.99$99.99$125.00
ORM ReviewYesYesYes
BuyAmazonReebokAmazon

Reebok All-Terrain Freedom Conclusion

If you are wondering still if you should buy this shoe or not, I would suggest not to. There are many great cushioned trail running shoes out there, even the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 that these were modeled after – but often a copy isn’t as good as the original. The one way that I can suggest these shoes is if you try them on in person to see if your foot fits the upper exactly when tightened, or from a website with free returns. The Reebok All-Terrain Freedom is clever with the one piece upper, but maybe a little too clever for their own good.


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Christopher is an attorney, a middle-of-the-pack triathlete, a marathoner, an open water swimmer, and a recovering Jeopardy contestant. A native New Yorker, he trains in the rugged wilderness of Central Park and can sometimes be found swimming in the Hudson. He also bakes pies. Delicious pies.
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Human Octane Men’s Balls to the Wall Shorts

Human Octane Men's Balls to the Wall
3.9 / 5 Overall
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In a market that is flooded with so many choices of what to wear on race day, it is difficult for quality brands to stand out. Often, the best marketing wins out over the better quality product. There have been many quality products that have debuted within the obstacle race catalog, only to dwindle due to poor marketing or the product just not catching on. Enter Human Octane, a new brand of clothing designed specifically for the OCR athlete with durability and utility in mind. We tested out their entire debut line over the course of multiple races of varying type and distance. We’ll be taking a look at their Men’s ‘Balls to the Wall‘ compression liner shorts

Human Octane Balls to the Wall Shorts Features

 

Right out of the packaging you can tell the quality of the material that Human Octane chose to use. It is extremely lightweight and has a durable feel to it. The shorts have an interior compression liner already built-in, hence the name.  Many men wear compression shorts/tights and (should) wear shorts over them while racing. This eliminates the need for that since they come already equipped. The standard ‘put your crap above your tail’ pouch comes stock on these as well. The last thing to note is there is a drawstring to adjust the sizing, should it not fit properly in the waist.

Rear Pocket

Human Octane Balls to the Wall Shorts Usage

To say I’ve been impressed with these shorts would be a gross understatement. It is pretty much the only shorts I’ll race in at this point. As mentioned before, the shorts are super light-weight. As someone that would run in only compression shorts previously, I barely notice that I’m wearing more. The shorts drain liquids quickly as well. The back pouch has reinforced material around the zipper to keep from snagging when using it, an issue found in many low-end running shorts. The fit is accurate to the sizing chart available on the website. I ended up removing the drawstring since they fit well without it. They also, as the name implies, keep the little boys snug where they should be. The one small negative issue I’ve had is when standing in water. Water will collect under the shirts in-between the liner and the shorts themselves, causing the shorts to ‘balloon’ out. All that is needed is to just push the shorts back to your leg and it is fixed for a few minutes. Ideally you won’t be standing in water while wearing the shorts.

Human Octane Balls to the Wall Shorts Durability

I’ve been really hard on all of the Human Octane gear. It holds up extremely well. It is all machine-wash on cold and air dry. The shorts have yet to fray, rip, or bear threads anywhere on the seams. They look brand new out of the wash every time as well. I’ve had no issues with the rear zipper pocket either. They are also made out of an antibacterial material that keeps them from getting that rank gym smell.

The Pros and The Cons

Pros

  • Extremely durable
  • Water-Repellent
  • Working rear zipper pocket
  • 2-in-1 compression and shorts
  • Antibacterial material

Cons

  • ‘Balloon’ effect when standing in water

 

Human Octane Men’s Balls to the Walls Compression Shorts Liner Conclusion

Human Octane’s debut line is off to a strong start. I really can’t say enough about these shorts. I’ve happily worn these shorts for everything from road 5ks to 75 mile trail races, and every distance obstacle course in-between. I would consider the shorts a ‘must-buy’ for any male running athlete, casual or elite. They look good and feel good. These shorts make me really excited to see what other products become available.


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Christopher is an attorney, a middle-of-the-pack triathlete, a marathoner, an open water swimmer, and a recovering Jeopardy contestant. A native New Yorker, he trains in the rugged wilderness of Central Park and can sometimes be found swimming in the Hudson. He also bakes pies. Delicious pies.
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TomTom Adventurer GPS Watch with Bluetooth Headphones Review

TomTom Adventurer
4.3 / 5 Overall
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The TomTom Adventurer is a one stop shop for all your workout needs. Bold statement, right? It is. But if you read into what I said you see there is specific wording in there. For working out, running, and most of your every day workout needs the TomTom Adventurer has you covered. Unfortunately this is a review for an obstacle course racing website and the watch has a flaw or two that it has had since before it evolved from the TomTom Cardio to the TomTom Spark to now.

TomTom Adventurer Features

Music  – Part of what makes this watch awesome is that it has the ability to store your music and play it to bluetooth headphones. If you use the headphones that TomTom includes it is a breeze to get it paired. If you use your own it will be a little laborious but you will pair them eventually. The other thing of note for the music is that you can sync the watch to an iTunes playlist. I’m a mac user so for me that is a big surprise since Apple doesn’t play nice with most outside companies.

Wrist Based Heart Rate Monitor – This is not a new feature for GPS or exercise watches but it works and that’s great. Its part of what makes this a full featured workout watch.

Elevation Tracking – With a built in barometer you can track your elevation without needing to have your phone or see if based on your route when you sync to a computer. If you are training for many of the OCR events that take place on out of season ski slopes, elevation will mean a lot to you in training.

TomTom Adventurer Usage

On the initial unboxing my complete excitement for the features was tempered by seeing that the watch itself was the mostly the same exact design they have had for a few years now. It is a bit sad because TomTom has made their watches functionally so much better every time they update their product line but they have stayed with the same poor ergonomics. I would even hazard to say this watch took a slight step back in comfort and look.

The casing that you separate the watch body from is hard in the center and has bulky pivoting flexible arms to wrap around your wrist. They bands feel like an afterthought and the watch is generally not comfortable to wear if you aren’t working out. The looks are pretty much the same, even the black version has an orange loop around it to secure the extra part of the secured watch band – orange is out of the question for my everyday life.

Then there is the fact that you more of less need to dismantle your watch every time you want to plug it in by usb.  It isn’t hard to do but it’s the only device that I have used, reviewed, or owned that is like this. My final touch on the ergonomics is the one centered button control. TomTom – please, please, please stop using this design. When I’m running it doesn’t feel intuitive and when you are crawling in mud you will get little bits of debris stuck in there.

Let’s get positive because this is a good watch with a ton of features. I wanted this watch so bad because of what the Apple Watch 2 didn’t do. I love tech and will often kickstart things that have a huge upside for my daily life without ever having them in hand or reading the fine print. The Apple watch 2 falls into this category, it had what is basically the feature set of the TomTom Adventurer minus a few things like a barometer. I bought it because I wanted a one stop watch for working out it ended up being a nightmare to pair and unpair headphones, get music on it, use the GPS and many more gripes. This isn’t an Apple watch review but I’m saying this to point out that the TomTom Adventurer does all of the things that the Apple Watch 2 failed to do for me.

When you use the TomTom Adventurer you will notice it makes things in life easier. After you unplug your the watch from your computer just grab your headphones and hit the road/trail/ski slope. You can do additional things like add in GPX based routes for hiking but most people will use this to workout. It never fails to sync my heart rate accurately, with gps and the altimeter tracking my movement, while the bluetooth headphones play music from the watch itself. This is the watch I have been waiting for in the tech department.

TomTom Adventurer Pros and Cons

Pros

  • All in one watch – GPS, Music, HRM, Altimeter
  • Affordable for what you get at just under $300
  • Works well with iTunes

Cons

  • Watch strap is bulky
  • USB plug feels like an afterthought

TomTom Adventurer Conclusion

Here we are at the overarching question, should you buy this watch? I can’t say definitively one way or the other to buy the TomTom Adventurer, this is really a matter of what your intended use case is. If you plan on using this for ultra running and very muddy obstacle course races I would suggest looking elsewhere. If you need a watch with all the features baked into one for every day usage, buy this watch. You can’t go wrong with this watch if you plan on exercising with it every day.

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Christopher is an attorney, a middle-of-the-pack triathlete, a marathoner, an open water swimmer, and a recovering Jeopardy contestant. A native New Yorker, he trains in the rugged wilderness of Central Park and can sometimes be found swimming in the Hudson. He also bakes pies. Delicious pies.
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Tifosi Synapse Sports Glasses Review

Tifosi Synapse Sports Glasses
3.8 / 5 Overall
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As Matt B. Davis and I were driving to Talladega Superspeedway this weekend for the first Bonefrog race of the 2017 season, we started listening to an audio book and began discussing whatever was coming to our minds at the time.

Matt asked, “why are you wearing those glasses”?

“I don’t know,” I said.  “They are the glasses I am reviewing for your website.”

“Duuuuddddddeeee!!!!”, gasped Matt B. Davis, “you totally didn’t tell me!”   Well, it was only 9 am, and I only just started on my morning coffee.   I pondered on why one might wear glasses on an obstacle course or mud run…to keep the sun, dirt, and mud out of their eyes?  Duh!  But how would I wipe them off?  And wouldn’t they just be a huge pain in the ass?…just another thing to worry about?   I am not a big fan of accessories dangling from my head or other body parts unless it’s a necessity, like something that holds food or water, or a hat, when I am working out.

It would be my first time wearing glasses for an obstacle race.  When I first was asked to review the new Tifosi Synapse glasses, I was perplexed.  I don’t like wearing glasses unless they are sunglasses, but, they might…keep shit out of my eyes!  So, I decided to accept the challenge.  I chose the race neon green color because they are bright and energetic, and the color ended up being the same color as the Bonefrog’s colors, so that was cool.  I chose the light night fototec lenses because I knew that I could be racing in any conditions, and these frames actually darken or lighten depending on the amount of ambient light.  I have been quite dubious from the start about being able to protect my eyes without them fogging however, so I started wearing them right away at my new job as a wildlife removal technician.  They are great for protecting my eyes against dust, construction materials, insulation dust, and the like, as well as rabid squirrels and raccoons, for the past few weeks. Also, they make me look the part for the job, which is a plus.  Fake it until you make it!   Anybody can make safety glasses however,  so keep reading to see how they would perform against the outdoors and elements of the Navy Seals built and tested obstacle course known as Bonefrog.

Tifosi Synapse Features

Vented Lenses  – This was the feature that I was skeptical about.  How would these glasses not fog up from the extreme amount of sweating that I do?  Well, the first time they would be tested was actually at Starbucks.  I went to Starbucks for coffee and ordered, and the steam coming from behind the counter immediately fogged up the glasses, and I thought…there is no way these glasses are going to work for an obstacle race.  The first mile of the race the glasses work great!  As I started to sweat a little bit, the wind in the speedway was howling.  The glasses were protecting my eyes from the wind as well as the wind was keeping the lenses defogged and dry.  I really was digging the vented lenses here.

Glare Guard and UVA/UVB Protection – These glasses are protected and coated with Tifosi’s proprietary glare guard that reduces eye strain.  I really enjoyed the view of the rolling green hills of middle Alabama with this object popping feature that enhances sight and clarity of all visuals.  The obstacles really popped out in front of me when I was running.  If I were an aging elite athlete, I would want these glasses on in order to focus in on all nicks and crannies in the obstacles and to be aware of all of my surroundings.  Furthermore, the glasses protected my face and eyes from the early spring sun sitting in the blue sky with their 100% UVA/UVB protection.

Grilamid TR-90 Frame and Hydrophilic Rubber – The frames are extremely lightweight and fit nicely on most faces.  They are made from hydrophilic rubber, which is very helpful because the more you sweat, the more they stick to your head.  Lastly, the glasses are very well made.  They are close to indestructible.  I dropped them a few times during the race, and afterwards they had no marks or scratches.

 

Tifosi Synapse Usage

I have used these glasses for both work and play.  I have used them for my new job as a wildlife removal technician. The fototec lenses change their tint depending on the amount of ambient light, so, they are perfect for using them inside and out.  They protect my eyes from the sun working on roofs as well as from working with lots of dust and debris in attics and crawl spaces.   The Bonefrog race put them to the test.  They performed very well in low light conditions with lots of wind and low humidity.  However, when I started sweating profusely in direct sunlight, the glasses started to fog just a little bit and sweat beads ran down the lenses.   I was not particularly agitated by this phenomenon, however it would have been nice to have a clothe to wipe them down with.  As I came to obstacles and took a breath, the glasses quickly defogged.  However, when I fell off the balance beam and fell into the river, the glasses became soaked.  I had to take the glasses off and run with them in my hand.  They would not dry quickly and I did not have a rag to dry them off with.  I could keep them on and just deal with it, however, it was more comfortable to just run with them in my hand.   We soon came to the memorial obstacle where we did 31 burpees for fallen soldiers, so I just took them off when I did the burpees.  They dried off and I continued to run with them on.

Tifosi Synapse Durability

These glasses seem to be extremely durable.  They are made of a nylon material that resists chemical and UV damage.  They also have a lifetime warranty against manufacturer defects.  I would try to run them over with my truck, however, I really don’t want to attempt the obvious.  I do believe they will sustain most usual wear and tear. Just don’t lose them or run them over.

Tifosi Synapse Pros and Cons

Pros

  • They are extremely lightweight.
  • The vented lenses provide a nice breeze.
  • They are durable.
  • The glare guard.

Cons

  • They still fog and take a little while to dry.

Tifosi Synapse Conclusion

These are great glasses for all types of activities.  The use of these at obstacle races is debatable, however.  People, especially elite and competitive athletes,  might not like having to take care of them during the race.  They would have to find something to wipe them off with if they get muddy, and sweat and high humidity seems like they can make them fog a bit.  When they are wet they don’t work as well, and they might have to take them off for some obstacles.  Overall,  they are fairly priced and have a lifetime warranty.  I would definitely buy them.   They are a runner’s, biker’s, and sportsman’s best friend.  I would advise that they work best in dry environments.  They do a great job at keeping out dust and dirt, however, mud can be an issue.  I love them and am truly grateful for being able to review them.

 

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Christopher Stephens

Christopher is an attorney, a middle-of-the-pack triathlete, a marathoner, an open water swimmer, and a recovering Jeopardy contestant. A native New Yorker, he trains in the rugged wilderness of Central Park and can sometimes be found swimming in the Hudson. He also bakes pies. Delicious pies.
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