Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Shoe Review

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0
4.3 Overall
0 Users (0 votes)
Features
Durability
Grip
Water Draining
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Reebok has released their latest model in the most popular line of shoes made specific for OCR, the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0. The newest version of the shoe has several major changes that look to improve upon past versions. They have added reinforcement around the areas the shoes commonly rip while also completely changing the uppers material. Another thing worth noting, that I will cover in more detail, is the new lacing system that is unlike any I have seen before.

There is a love/hate relationship within the community based on the people who preach unparalleled drainage, excellent grip and OCR specific features, that stand opposite those who saw it’s a 1-3 race shoe before you’re contacting Reebok customer care for an exchange/refund/discount. The ripping could be explained by the narrow fit of the shoe, past materials used and grueling conditions they’re put through with each race. To view all the comparisons between the 3.0’s and past models read up here. If you have owned past versions, or looked at the comparisons to previous versions, you can tell Reebok is trying to get it right without going to far from the initial vision. To make a lightweight, durable, water draining shoe for obstacle course racing.

 

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Features

Dura-Grip Seal  – On any other shoe I wouldn’t be listing a rubber seal grip as a feature but this is the first and last concern 9/10 people will inquire about. The “Dura-Grip” rubber is reinforcing the toe box where the previous models were widely known for tearing. It looks like Reebok heard the call for correction(or got tired of replacing shoes for this issue).

Rope Pro – The Reebok All-Terrain line has always been praised for their OCR specific features. The “Rope Pro” is an exterior tread that originates on the bottom midsole of the shoe and continues its journey up the side of the shoe all the way to the laces. This sticky tread is found on the interior outsole of both shoes placed to optimize grip for rope climbs whether you lock both feet onto the rope with the base of your midsole or utilize the efficient hook method with your shoe. This tread is also efficient in wall traverse midsole grip and for several other obstacles.

Drainage Holes – Reebok produced the first shoe in the sport to use factory drainage ports. Many remember how these were met with rave reviews, followed by repetitive complaints on debris collection from the ports. This feature has been unchanged from inception through multiple releases of the Reebok All-Terrain line. If you loved the drainage on previous models and felt some debris was a small price to pay, you’ll be happy.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Usage

I was on the side of those that experienced durability issues in the past with this line of shoe and was a skeptic on the Super 3.0 fixing this issue. For that reason I wanted to make sure to run these through the ringer, literally. Getting my hands on these at the back end of race season posed a challenge to find races and truly mimic the wear and (hopefully no) tear that race shoes go through. I found a perfect test at the FIT Challenge located in Rhode Island.

Those familiar with this race, know the technical terrain, natural elements and pressure applied to your shoes from the steep downhill paths used. Two laps (6.8 miles) of hills, rocks, trail, steep uphill and downhill treks. A concern I had was the painful ability to feel every rock, root and uneven terrain under your feet. The grip was as good as expected in comparison to previous models. One aspect I felt the all terrain line were effective in producing was a solid grip on the tread.

A new feature in the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 is the lacing system. The laces do not go through the shoe, rather through a stand alone piece of rubber that is separate from the tongue of the shoe. Personally this was a major drawback for me as the Reebok All-Terrain is already a low cut shoe lacking in ankle stability, this new lacing system does not allow for a lace lock tie method which would normally secure the shoe more firmly to your ankle. On steep downhills you have excess mobility in your ankle providing a less secure, less confident level of support.

Outside that event all usage of the shoe for a thorough test was on flat trail runs totaling around 150 miles. While I didn’t experience any tears similar to previous models I did have cause for concern detailed in the durability section of this review.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Durability

As previously stated they performed without any tears or visible separation in the outsole tread or toe cap. My concern was with the “Dura-Grip” seal that covers the toe box to reinforce the toe box. The seal only extended to the toe cap of the shoe and not the outside of the shoe where the tears have occurred in the past. As you can see from the picture they used a very thin material to cover a mesh webbing in the problem section of previous models. The material over the mesh began to pull away from the mesh. I fear that with regular use of the shoe in OCR settings the mesh and lining material will soften when wet and be a cause for concern.

The rubber lacing strip that secures the laces stayed secure to the shoe but was an area I kept an eye on, being a new design I haven’t seen in Reeboks or any other brand for that matter. There has been no issues with the new lacing systems durability.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Drainage Ports
  • “Rope Pro” obstacle targeted tread
  • Reinforced toe cap
  • “Rock Guard” located in the midsole

Cons

  • Diameter of drainage ports
  • Stand alone lacing system
  • Minimal ankle support
  • Lack of reinforced materials in previous troubled spots

Similar Products

Reebok All Terrain Super 3.0Reebok All Terrain Super ORVJ Sport Irock 2Merrell All Out Peak
Weight220g219g240g295g
Heel Drop5mm5mm6mm6mm
Grip3/16"3/16"3/16"1/4"
Metal StudsNoNoNoNo
Price$124.99$90.00$99.00$69.00
ORM ReviewYesYesYes Yes
BuyReebokAmazonPendingAmazon

 

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Conclusion

I went into this review with an open mind giving this model a clean slate from past issues in the Reebok All-Terrain line. I came out of this review optimistic that Reebok is listening to feedback and concerns from previous styles while maintaining the features that everyone loved, be it drainage or tread. I’m very curious to see how receptive others are on the new lacing system as this was a negative change for me. I’ll still be concerned with the material used on the outer toe box where previous models had durability issues. My final thought is that I’m cautiously optimistic that there will be less complaints of tears in the newest Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0.

 

 

For more photos see our preview of the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0

 


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Obstacle Course Racing Holiday Buying Guide

Coming up to another years holiday season when you think, what do I buy my OCR loving friend/spouse/relative/booty call for Christmas/Chanukah/Kwanzaa/Other Winter Holiday?

We at Obstacle Racing Media are here to help.

Check out our holiday buying guide and let us know in the comments if we missed a must buy.

Stocking Stuffers: Under $25

obstacle-course-racing-gift-guide-1

 

Under the  Tree / Menorah: $25 – $100

obstacle-course-racing-gift-guide-3

 

Video Humblebrag Moment: $100 and up

Rock concert

 

 

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Preview

reebok-all-terrain-super-3-preview-4

Reebok has allowed us to preview their latest iteration of the Reebok All-Terrain Super line up that is due for release in the next 2-4 months. They have gone back to the numbering convention after the recent Reebok All-Terrain Super OR – which you can think of as 2.5. With that said we have the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 here for preview. We will come back with a more in-depth review after we have put a few hundred miles on them.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Updates

First up the first thing you notice is that they weigh almost an ounce more than the previous version thanks to the reinforced upper. You can see some of the changes in this photo –

reebok-all-terrain-super-3-preview-9

There is a rubber coating around the entire toe box area. The “Dura-Grip” continues to the inner arch area where it is called “Rope-Pro”. The “Rope-Pro” is supposed to help with rope climbs and provide durability on the ropes.

reebok-all-terrain-super-3-preview-8

That same rubberized coating continues up to the lace area and is actually the structure that holds the laces to the shoes. This is a little worrisome since normally laces go through the entire fabric of the shoe. By laces going through the shoes, it makes ripping out a lace hole nearly impossible. The laces here are just looped under the rubber and are shielded from the inside. The upside to this is that the this feature helps keep debris from the inside of the shoe.

More along the lines of isolating the inside of the shoe, they have made something close to a one piece upper with a completely new tongue design. The new tongue is connected on one side as you see but the other side connects near the base of the foot with a thin mesh that goes inside the shoe. This should keep more debris out as well as letting the shoe fit a larger range of feet widths. With one piece uppers if you aren’t within a certain range it can be too tight and if your feet are too small when tightening the material will bunch – this looks to solve that while still having the same effect as a completely one piece upper.

reebok-all-terrain-super-3-preview-2

reebok-all-terrain-super-3-preview-7

Another change to the Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 is the heel has an added amount of padding. This should help keep the heel more locked in to help prevent losing your shoes in the mud pits. This is speculation on it’s effectiveness but that appears to be the purpose of the added padding.

reebok-all-terrain-super-3-preview-12

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Similarities

There are a two main things that are completely the same and with good reason, they work. The sole is completely unchanged and will continue to provide amazing grip while running in the mud. Water drainage ports remain on the side of the front of both foot to keep this as the fastest/best draining shoe you can use for OCR.

One thing that hasn’t changed, that some people won’t be happy about, is that the width is the same. The last for this shoe is the same as all the previous versions. It remains to be seen if they will release a wide version but we won’t hold out breath on it since they haven’t in the past 3 years of releasing this shoe.

Reebok All-Terrain Super 3.0 Wrap-Up

Reebok continues to try and hit the sweet spot between performance and durability with this beefed up version of the shoe. They have completely changed the thin synthetic upper to a more durable feeling material that shouldn’t rip from normal running. The only thing that appears to have gone in potentially the wrong direction is the way the laces are attached. We will post a full usage review in the coming months with the full rundown of wether or not these will hold up under the rigors of OCR.

 

SEE THE FULL REVIEW HERE

 

Hoka One One Clayton Review

Hoka One One Clayton
3.7 Overall
0 Users (0 votes)
Features
Durability
Grip
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I purchased the Hoka One One Clayton shoes prior to running A Race For The Ages (ARFTA) when I realized I would be on my feet for potentially 32 hours. In the end I only ran for about 11-12 hours before calling it quits but it was a great initial test for the Hoka One One Clayton’s.  Leading up to the race I had run about 20 mies in the Hoka One One Clayton’s to break them in and since then I have put around 200 miles on them prior to this review. These are not obstacle racing shoes, they are shoes you would run in to train for an Obstacle Course Race. 

hoka-one-one-clayton-review-2

Taking in the view prior to ARFTA

Hoka One One Clayton Features

Lightweight Breathable Upper  – The upper material on these shoes is so thin and transparent that I was very nervous about it’s durability when I started wearing them. It turns out they just got the material (No-Sew TPU Lattice) perfect.

Lightweight Everything – I could go through each element of the shoe but they made everything light. The shoe weighs in at a shocking 7.3 oz. The only area I was a little concerned with the weight cutting was the heel cup. I’m guilty of not untying my shoes between wears and when I slide my foot in I can easily crush the heel area. No problem here, just an observation for some people that may need more shoe support.

Wide Foot Base – Hoka calls this feature – Oversize Active Foot Frame – what it boils down to is the sole of the shoe has a wide footprint. I think this provides some stability that makes up for the shoes general lack of structure. It’s not an often used concept and I wouldn’t want to wear shoes with this feature on a trail run but it works here.

Hoka One One Clayton Usage

As I stated in my intro, I wore these shoes initially for two training runs of around 10 miles prior to 40 miles at ARFTA. One thing I didn’t mention in my intro was that when I ordered them I bought my normal size of 9.5 and a size 10. I did this because my last Hoka’s that I bought felt very short at 9.5 and were constantly rubbing my toes. I tried them on and ended up returning the 9.5’s, this is the first time for any shoe ever in 15 years that I have bought a size up. I was immediately nervous about buying a size up but after running in them I realized it’s the the way I need to buy Hoka’s from now on. My old Hoka Clifton’s have the outside area of both toe boxes cut out so I can wear them on occasion.

hoka-one-one-clayton-review-3

Hoka Clifton with Cutout

When it came to actually using the Hoka One One Clayton I found them to be surprisingly supportive with their stripped down weight. I mean, you are running in shoes that feel like road racing flats but they have 24mm of cushioning in the heel and 20mm in the forefoot. The break in period was not noticeable (for my body/sore muscles) and pretty much seamless going from Inov-8 Ultra 270’s to these. What I did notice was the very cushioned feel in comparison, these feel like pillows like the rest of Hoka’s shoe lineup.

I have worn them only on packed trails/ road and that is the only surfaces I would suggest because of their wide base. The base of Hoka’s used to make me nervous because it was so built up tall that you can roll your ankle easily in them since the fulcrum point it creates and these are similar but in width instead. They width does feel safer than the platform like style of the other Hoka One One’s.

The only real issue that these shoes have is that the grip is very soft and as a result not durable. They are using a new type of material called RMAT and it trades off durability for performance. After about 200 miles the heel has almost worn through to the cushioning. I’m a little annoyed here because they are such expensive shoes ($150) and it looks like I can maybe get 300-350 miles out of them which is a poor investment for running shoes. I’ll be emailing Hoka to see if this is normal and to get an official response that I will update here.

Hoka One One Clayton Durability

The durability of the Upper is, as I stated previously, perfect. Hoka managed to get a super breathable and thin upper that shows no signs of ripping. The sole is the main area of concern and I would love to hear from other people that have worn these if their soles have worn down fast. Leave Comments and Reviews!

hoka-one-one-clayton-review-4

Hoka One One Clayton Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Very Light weight 7.3 oz
  • Breathable upper
  • Great Cushioning

Cons

  • Expensive – $150
  • Not durable sole

Hoka One One Clayton Conclusion

The main question that matters – would I suggest you buy the Hoka One One Clayton? Yes – but be aware you may need to replace them sooner than you would like. If you are trying to keep you running habit to a bare minimum as far as costs are concerned, don’t buy these. What the Clayton’s bring to the table is a high performance shoe that is on the expensive end of shoes. Like many thing in life you get to pick two – Good, fast, or cheap – Hoka chose good and fast for these shoes and that’s what you get in the Hoka One One Clayton.

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Altra Golden Spike Review

Altra Golden Spike
3.8 Overall
0 Users (0 votes)
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Water Draining
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Well known for their line of foot-shaped shoes with roomy toe boxes and a natural fit, Altra has become increasingly popular over the last few years, especially among ultra distance trail runners. Despite their growing popularity, they have yet to tap into the short distance market, let alone the world of obstacle racing. With the addition of the Altra Golden Spike to the lineup, that may change. While it’s only their first shoe to cater to high speed racers, they did a fantastic job with it and it has the potential to be a great choice for short course OCR, or virtually any other race where you need to run fast!

altra-golden-spike-review-1

Altra Golden Spike Features

Spikes or No Spikes  – the Golden Spike, as it’s name suggests, comes with five gold colored spikes per shoe, but you can wear the shoe with or without them. Some companies will offer a spikeless model of their racing shoes, meant specifically for road and trail running when spikes aren’t needed; with Altra, you just have to leave them out if you don’t want them. While a dedicated spikeless model would be cool, it’s not a big deal. The main downside is that after lots of racing and training with the spikes removed, the holes may get so beat up and filled with dirt that you can’t get the spikes in later if/when you want to.

With the spikes in, the shoe basically performs like you would expect a spike to perform. It has great traction (the same amount of traction as any other spike, for the most part) and it feels fast. Aside from the obvious, nothing really changes with the spikes removed. Without them, the shoe has pretty good traction as you can see, similar to some of Altra’s other shoes like the Superior. It doesn’t compare to an x-talon, but the traction is on par with things like the New Balance Minimus or Brooks Pure Grit. It doesn’t look like much, but it grips well while still allowing for decent ground feel.

altra-golden-spike-review-4

Top shoe: Brooks Mach 14, Bottom Shoe: Altra Golden Spike

Stack Height, Weight, and Other Specs – like all of Altra’s shoes, these are zero drop. That means that the heel of the shoe is at the same level as the toes. The total stack height is 15mm, so you have a little over a half inch of rubber and foam underfoot for cushioning and support. It’s not really much, and it’s certainly no Hoka, but I found it refreshingly soft compared to my last pair of racing shoes. Even with a touch of cushion, the shoe is very light at 5.2oz for a men’s size 9.0. It’s not the featherweight of something like the Mizuno Wave Universe (2.8oz), but it’s a lot lighter than your average OCR shoe. It doesn’t have any extra material to hold water either, so even when soaking wet, it’s still lighter than Inov-8’s most popular options.

Upper, Tongue, and Laces – it doesn’t look like it in pictures, but the tongue is actually fully attached to the upper, so you don’t have to worry about it sliding around or being uncomfortable. It’s not a super papery, scratchy tongue like some, so it feels good against the top of your foot even without socks. They also used pretty soft laces, so it doesn’t feel like fishing line running across your feet. The upper is somewhat soft, but kind of plasticy too. Not the most comfortable upper I’ve ever felt, but it still passes the sockless test; I’d wear it without socks and not worry about blisters.

altra-golden-spike-review-2

Sole, Footbed – The Altra Golden Spike fixes some issues that I’ve had with other Altra shoes in the past. Before, on steep downhill runs in wet conditions, the footbed would slowly start to bunch up in the front of the shoe and become a major pain in the butt. However, the footbed is glued in place with the Golden Spike, so this isn’t a concern.

Natural Fit – Like all of their other shoes, the Altra Golden Spike is what they call “foot shaped”, meaning it has a wide toe box and allows for toe-splay instead of squeezing your toes together. Shouldn’t all shoes be shaped like feet? Why is this an award winning innovation? It seems like common sense to me, but I digress… Anyone who has ever worn spikes knows how uncomfortable they can be. Altra encourages their customers: “don’t settle for the XC spike that hurts the least”. I’d have to agree. The wide toe box on the Altra Golden Spike (lower) is clearly a better fit than my old Brooks Mach 14 spikes (upper).

altra-golden-spike-review-3

Colors and Sizing– the Altra Golden Spike is unisex, so the fit is the same for men and women. It’s a bit ironic since they advertise a female specific fit on their other shoes, but I guess when it comes to speed, men’s and women’s feet have the same needs. The shoes come in red, green, blue, and pink. You can get them anywhere from a size 4.0 (women’s 5.5) to a 15.0. This is still kind of disappointing as I know a handful of women that wear a 4.5 or 5.0 who have extremely limited footwear options, but at least there’s a 5.5. The shoe fits a bit large, about a 1/4 size in my opinion, so size down for a competition fit.

Altra Golden Spike Usage

altraracephoto2

I have used the Golden Spike for various training runs on the road, trail, and treadmill, and it’s a great shoe on all surfaces. I mostly use the shoe with the spikes removed, but they perform as expected when you put them in; they’re metal, sharp, and stick into the ground – that’s about it. Most spikes are so tight and uncomfortable that you can’t wait to rip them off after your race or workout. Not so with the Golden Spike!

Beyond comfort, I’ve really enjoyed their versatility. While remaining super light, they still have enough cushioning that it feels fine for mid distance road runs. You’re not limited to short track workouts with the Altra Golden Spike and it seems like it’s built to handle more miles than your average spike. It’s comfortable enough that you could run a 10k or even a 13.1 if your feet are strong enough to run in a minimalist shoe for that distance.

I ordered my first pair of Golden Spikes a half-size too large which made them far less comfortable. I highly recommend you don’t make the same mistake. While the upper is comfortable when it fits properly, a poor fit will result in pinching around the toes and severe blistering! When it fits well, the shoe is astonishingly comfortable, and not just for a spike. I would still recommend a thin sock, but the upper materials are soft and pliable. If you think you’re between sizes, opt for the smaller size; it’s a pretty flexible shoe and can fit tightly while still feeling good. If it’s too loose then you’ll have the same problems I did with my first pair – not fun.

While most of my experience has been on the road, I think the Golden Spike really shines on the trail. With the spikes removed, it still has excellent traction. Plus, it’s comfortable enough to wear for longer distances and has moderate cushioning (as far as racing flats go). With all that in mind, it will be my go-to shoe for 10k-13.1 trail races!

Altra Golden Spike Durability

It drains exceptionally well and has a glued in footbed, ideal for wet and muddy conditions. I’m tempted to take this shoe out to an OCR to see how it performs. I have no doubt that it would perform well over varied terrain, but I worry about it’s durability through obstacles. It would be fine for a stadium race, but a Spartan Beast might be more than it can handle. It is tougher than a lot of spikes on the market, so it has great potential. Only time and further testing will tell if it can stand up to some of the tougher courses and obstacles.

If you only intend on using the Golden Spike for trail racing, I’d tell you the durability was excellent. Just don’t expect it to compare to something like an Inov-8 or Icebug. While the traction is excellent for dry courses, it simply won’t perform well in mud like a shoe with lugs.

altra-golden-spike-review-5

Altra Golden Spike Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Comfortable
  • Durable for “normal” use
  • One piece construction

Cons

  • No spikeless model
  • Probably not durable enough for long OCR

Similar Products

Altra Golden SpikeBrooks PureGrit 5Reebok All Terrain Super OR
Weight290g277g219g
Heel Drop0mm4mm5mm
Grip1/8"3/16"3/16"
Metal StudsYesNoNo
Price$90.00$119.00$90.00
ORM ReviewYesYesYes
BuyAmazonAmazonAmazon

Altra Golden Spike Conclusion

While the Altra Golden Spike might not be the next big shoe in OCR, it’s worth checking out if you run other short distance events. Try it out for your next road or trail race and see why I love this shoe! You may just fall in love with it and end up wearing it for your next obstacle race. If you do, let me know how it goes. My hope is that Altra will expand their offerings and make a beefier version geared towards obstacle racers!

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Mike Natale

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Salomon Speedtrak Review

Salomon Speedtrak
3.8 Overall
4.5 Users (1 vote)
Features
Durability
Grip
Water Draining
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The Salomon Speedtrak is Salomon’s latest entry into the trail and obstacle course racing shoe category. Back in the Fall of 2013, Salomon were eager to get their new deep lugged shoes into the hands of obstacle racers. So everyone (and their mom) got a pair Salomon Fellraisers to review. The feedback was very similar across the board. Great in the mud, but a little on the heavy side, and they don’t drain. Oh, and like most Salomon’s, they run a little narrow.

Salomon_SpeedTrak_Review 2

Since then, the OCR shoe market has caught up with the idea of larger lugs. Several brands including the Merrel Crush, Reebok All-Terrain OR, and other shoes you can find here have incorporated them. While the Salomon Fellraisers have continued to be produced every year with no change, this spring (2016), the SpeedTraks were born and we finally have a new version to run in.

Salomon Speedtrak Features

QuickLaces – As stated in previous reviews, I am a huge fan of speed lacing. They insure I don’t have to stop mid race. Additionally, I don’t spend countless minutes loosening double knots to retie every time.

Anti-debris mesh outer – Updated better materials from the previous Fellraiser. The mesh is now a different pattern that allows water to flow slightly better while keeping debris out even better.

Wet traction contragrip outsole – The kept the same exact grip as the Fellraisers which was a good call because they had already gotten it right the first time.

Salomon_SpeedTrak_Review 4 (comparison to Fells)

Top is the Salomon Speedtrak, bottom Salomon Fellrasier

 

Salomon Speedtrak Usage

Along with the usual trails I cover on training runs, my first obstacle race in these guys was at the Hannibal Race in Lebanon. These was some of the roughest/strangest terrain I have been on. Lots of different types of rocks including some massive ones that I could only describe as coral out of the water.

The uppers are damn near impenetrable as I finished the race with no rocks inside the shoes.  The lugs are fantastic and I was able to scale the muddy slip wall where many were failing wearing inferior shoes.

Salomon Speedtrak Durability

As stated above, the uppers are not letting anything in. The rest of the shoe, can best be described as “tank like”. Durable may be these shoes middle name.

Salomon Speedtrak Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Great for rough terrain.
  • Solid construction on tongue an upper. No rocks getting in these anytime soon.

Cons

  • Still a bit too heavy for my taste.
  • No drainage holes. Considering adding my own holes with a drill, since everything else about them, makes a great OCR shoe.

Similar Products

Salomon SpeedtrakSalomon FellraiserReebok All Terrain ThrillMerrell All Out Crush
Weight245g240g320g227g
Heel Drop6mm6mm13mm6mm
Grip3/16"3/16"3/16"3/16"
Metal StudsNoNoNoNo
Price$99.00$100.00$125.00$100
ORM ReviewYesYesYesYes
BuyAmazonAmazonAmazonAmazon

Salomon Speedtrak Conclusion

The Salomon Speedtrack is a beast on trails. I would wear it for any trail run or ultra-marathon. You do lose being “light on your feet”, but this is probably about as light as you can get with this much durability. Concerning, the million dollar question about being too narrow. At size 11 (my standard running shoe size),  I began getting blisters on top inside of my foot. When I bumped to 11.5, they feet perfectly, including the heel.

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Mike Natale

Mike Natale is an OCR addict who loves life, family & medals!

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